Black Protest and the Great Migration: A Brief History with Documents / Edition 1

Black Protest and the Great Migration: A Brief History with Documents / Edition 1

by Eric Arnesen
     
 

ISBN-10: 0312391293

ISBN-13: 9780312391294

Pub. Date: 04/28/2003

Publisher: Bedford/St. Martin's

During World War I, as many as half a million southern African Americans permanently left the South to create new homes and lives in the urban North, and hundreds of thousands more would follow in the 1920s. This dramatic transformation in the lives of many black Americans involved more than geography: the increasingly visible “New Negro” and the

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Overview

During World War I, as many as half a million southern African Americans permanently left the South to create new homes and lives in the urban North, and hundreds of thousands more would follow in the 1920s. This dramatic transformation in the lives of many black Americans involved more than geography: the increasingly visible “New Negro” and the intensification of grassroots black activism in the South as well as the North were the manifestations of a new challenge to racial subordination. Eric Arnesen’s unique collection of articles from a variety of northern, southern, black, and white newspapers, magazines, and books explores the “Great Migration,” focusing on the economic, social, and political conditions of the Jim Crow South, the meanings of race in general — and on labor in particular — in the urban North, the grassroots movements of social protest that flourished in the war years, and the postwar “racial counterrevolution.” An introduction by the editor, headnotes to documents, a chronology, questions for consideration, a bibliography, and an index are included.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780312391294
Publisher:
Bedford/St. Martin's
Publication date:
04/28/2003
Series:
Bedford Cultural Editions Series
Edition description:
First Edition
Pages:
226
Sales rank:
1,003,169
Product dimensions:
5.43(w) x 8.16(h) x 0.45(d)

Table of Contents

Foreword
Preface
Pt. 1Introduction : "the great American protest"1
Origins of the great migration1
Wartime opportunities in the north7
The promised land?11
Wartime black leaders, the new Negro, and grassroots politics18
Racial violence and the postwar reaction to black activism29
Consequences of the migration35
Pt. 2The documents45
1The great migration begins45
The migration of Negroes, June 191746
The Negro exodus : a Southern woman's view, March 18, 191750
How much is the migration a flight from persecution? : September 192354
1100 Negroes desert Savannah, Georgia, August 11, 191658
Luring labor north, August 22, 191659
Negroes urged to remain in south, November 25, 191661
Negro migration, August 1, 191762
2The promised land?67
The arrival in Chicago, 192267
Read this before you move north, April 5, 191772
Negroes a source of industrial labor, August 191874
The Negro in the north, June 4, 191778
The massacre of east St. Louis, September 191780
Thousands march in silent protest, August 4, 191785
3The evolution of black politics87
The patriotism of the Negro, May 4, 191788
Close ranks, July 191889
Negro conscription, October 20, 191790
Protest to Boston Herald, April 20, 191893
Houston : an NAACP investigation, November 191794
Racial clashes, July 26, 191996
League asks full manhood rights, May 19, 191798
The heart of the south, May 191799
Reconstruction and the Negro, February 1919103
Migration and political power, July 1918106
What we believe, January 1, 1924 and The principles of the universal Negro improvement association, November 25, 1922107
New leadership for the Negro, May-June 1919113
If we must die, September 1919115
The new Negro, June 2, 1920117
Letter to president Woodrow Wilson, May 29, 1918123
Campaign for women nearing its close, November 1, 1917124
Negro women seek permission to vote, November 3, 1920126
4Black workers and the wartime home front128
Trades unions, March 1918129
From Alabama : colored miners anxious for organization, June 1, 1916132
The Birmingham case, 1918134
Negro organizer tarred, Tune, 14, 1918138
Negro strikers return to work, October 3, 1918139
Colored women of Houston organize, May 6, 1916140
Negro washerwomen to have union wage scale, October 10, 1918141
Workers strike in laundries to get higher pay, April 23, 1918141
Negro women are under arrest in laundry strike, April 25, 1918143
Negro women living in idleness must go to work or to jail, October 17, 1918144
Negroes to demand work at Charleston navy yard, May 19, 1917145
5Opportunities and obstacles in the postwar era147
Views and reviews : now comes the test, November 23, 1918147
Reconstruction and the colored woman, January 1919151
Letters from the U.S. Department of Labor case files, 1919154
Bogalusa, January 1920159
Colored labor delegation demands rights in Alabama, February 28, 1920164
Negroes in the unions, August 1925165
The rights of the black man, August 2, 1919166
Race riots in Chicago, July 28, 1919168
Chicago in the nation's race strife, August 9, 1919169
Slowly restore order today in riot districts, October 3, 1919172
The race conflict in Arkansas, December 13, 1919173
How the Arkansas peons were freed, July 28, 1923177
6Postwar migration180
"Chi" Negroes ask to return to Mississippi, August 1, 1919181
Negroes who come to south are better off, August 24, 1919, and find the southern Negro prosperous, October 5, 1919182
Why southern Negroes don't go south, November 29, 1919184
Mighty exodus continues; cause not economic, July 22, 1920189
These "colored" United States, December 1923190
Negro migration : its effect on family and community life in the north, October 1924193
The new Negro, 1925198
AppChronology of events related to the great migration (1865-1925)204
AppQuestions for consideration206
App: Selected bibliography207
Index213

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