Black Robe

( 9 )

Overview

His name is Father Laforgue, a young Jesuit missionary come from Europe to the New World to bring the word of God to the heathen. He is given minimal aid by the governor of the vast territory that is proudly named New France but is in reality still ruled by the Huron, Iroquois, and Algonkin tribes who have roamed it since the dawn of time and whom the French call Savages. His mission is to reach and bring salvation to an isolatied Huron tribe decimated by disease in the far north before incoming winter closes off...

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Overview

His name is Father Laforgue, a young Jesuit missionary come from Europe to the New World to bring the word of God to the heathen. He is given minimal aid by the governor of the vast territory that is proudly named New France but is in reality still ruled by the Huron, Iroquois, and Algonkin tribes who have roamed it since the dawn of time and whom the French call Savages. His mission is to reach and bring salvation to an isolatied Huron tribe decimated by disease in the far north before incoming winter closes off his path to them. His guides are a group of Savages who mock his faith and their pledges even as they accept muskets as their payment.

Father Laforgue is about to enter a world of pagan power and sexual license, awesome courage and terrible cruelty, that will test him to the breaking point as both a man and a priest, and alter him in ways he cannot dream.

In weaving a tautly suspenseful tale of physical and spiritual adventure in a wilderness frontier on the cusp of change, Brian Moore has written a novel that rivals Joseph Conrad's Heart of Darkness in its exploration of the confrontation between Western ideology and native peoples, and its meditation upon Good and Evil in the human heart.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780452278653
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated
  • Publication date: 6/28/1997
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 256
  • Sales rank: 337,149
  • Product dimensions: 5.38 (w) x 8.06 (h) x 0.65 (d)

Meet the Author

Brian Moore is the author of nineteen novels, including The Statement, No Other Life, Lies Of Silence and The Lonely Passion Of Judith Hearne. Mr. Moore was short-listed three times for Britain's Booker Prize. He passed away in 1999.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 9 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(3)

4 Star

(2)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

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1 Star

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Sort by: Showing all of 10 Customer Reviews
  • Posted June 12, 2012

    not worth the time

    One lady in our book club laughingly called it "Catholic porn." The sex, violence, and foul language set the scene for a plot that could have been powerful. Instead, we were offered sex, violence, and foul language, and little else. Black Robe was one of those books that that leaves you with a feeling that you basicly just wasted your time.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 19, 2005

    excruciatingly bad novel

    I actually read this novel some years ago, while doing historical research on the Jesuits and the Hurons in Canada. I try to be parsimonious with my superlatives, but this book was one of the worst novels I've ever read (and I've skimmed some truly awful stuff). The psychological 'insights' were shallow, the historical elements were competently researched but no more than that, and, although I'm no prude when it comes to taboo subject matter or foul language, I thought the author's use of them was too lowbrow and had no redeeming qualities. I skim-read the last third of the book just to get it over with and, unless I hear that the author's writing technique improved dramatically since this novel appeared, or that 'Black Robe' was an unfortunate fluke, I can't imagine ever touching one of his novels again.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 14, 2012

    The plot line as acceptable as far as I went in the book--about

    The plot line as acceptable as far as I went in the book--about 30 pages. I found the fixation by the author of having everyone from the Jesuits on up to Champlain constantly referring to the Wendat (Hurons) and other tribes, Mohawk, Seneca, Iroquois, and all the others as "Savages," capitalized in each instance, as racist. Even to me as a non-Indian author, I found the book to be incredibly biased and bigoted against the true first inhabitants of North America. I obtained a paperback version of the book in good condition, but with pages misplaced from proper order. Because of the repeatedly demeaning characterization of all the tribes, I find the book to be an insult to the various tribes of the Northeastern parts of Canada and the United States. Ironically, the book was recommended to me on the Internet by a man from Pennsylvania who claims to be descended from the Mohawks, one of the "Savage" uncultured peoples in the book. So much for believing the opinion of a supposed member of the Five Nations.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 6, 2005

    Summer Reading

    Well written, however, vulgar and lacking a satisfying conclusion.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 30, 2002

    Homework

    I had to read this book for a world history class I am taking at S.V.S.U. Having no preveous knowledge on the subject I went at this assinment sort of blind. I have always loved to read, and this book was well written. For me it not only made this assinment insightful, enjoyable, and worthwhile, but also it sparked an interest in Brian Moores work. I am eagerly lookforward to getting my hands an another one of his books. Definatly an enjoyable read!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 30, 2000

    There is no such thing as a bad Brian Moore book.

    Blackrobe is a complex novel on one level in that it looks faith and God through familiar and foreign eyes. But in the end, the subject is the same for all. We all face spiritual and moral crises and it is how we deal with these crises that form who we are.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 25, 2000

    the finest of novels

    i have to throw off the average costumer review rating of three stars that was given to this book. this book completely threw me off gaurd. this is how the indians truly lived. This book is hands down, without a doubt, the gutsiest book i ever read. black robe pulls no punches. This book isn't for the politically correct, or the faint of heart. The plot and dialogue are commanding, unique, and unfortunately for some readers, realistic. It will make you view the world in a way that you probably never viewed it before. This is what a great novel should do; unfortunately many novels a pure dribble. This book is truly a profound and mind-altering parable. Highly recommended

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 19, 2000

    Challenging the Catholic establishment of tradition and rituals

    I hate to break it to you William G, but the image Moore paints is extremely realistic. The sexual and vulgar acts he portrayed in the novel were a common part in the Indian culture in the area; yes, the Iroquois were cannibals. Robert Ebert reviewed the movie based on the book saying, 'It is a torturous experience, and 'Black Robe' visualizes it in one of the most realistic depictions of Indian life I have seen.' I did find Moore's style a little lacking at times, but overall, the challenge against LaForgue's faith from many different people was what kept me interested. This book could best be characterized as a journey of faith that combines realistic portrayals of the Canadian indian culture and conflicting catholic beliefs that in the end challenges LaForgue's own beliefs and his view on the establishment of Catholic rituals and traditions.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 31, 1999

    terrible writing

    There are few books I literally regret the time I invested in reading, but this is one of them. 'Black Robe' tries to paint a realistic, 'hard-boiled' account of what life was like for the Indians and missionaries but goes way overboard in grossing out the reader, to the point where it is no longer artistic. The author's handling of dialogue and reflection is worse than the passages between Maria and Robert Jordan in Hemingway's 'For Whom the Bell Tolls.' His research is adequate, but he fits the historical facts into the narrative in a paint-by-numbers manner and it contributes little to the overall artistic effect. The book at least has a competent command of plot and the author knows how to put sentences in order properly, so it isn't a complete wash-out, but it comes pretty close.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 27, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

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