Black Skin, White Masks

Black Skin, White Masks

4.7 6
by Frantz Fanon, Fanon
     
 

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Few modern voices have had as profound an impact on black identity and critical race studies as Frantz Fanon's, and Black Skin, White Masks represents some of his most important work. Fanon's masterwork is now available in a new translation that updates its language for a new generation of readers.

A major influence on international civil rights, anticolonial,

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Overview

Few modern voices have had as profound an impact on black identity and critical race studies as Frantz Fanon's, and Black Skin, White Masks represents some of his most important work. Fanon's masterwork is now available in a new translation that updates its language for a new generation of readers.

A major influence on international civil rights, anticolonial, and black consciousness movements, Black Skin, White Masks is an unsurpassed study of the black psyche in a white world. Hailed for its scientific analysis and poetic grace when it was first published in 1952, the book remains a vital force today from one of the most important thinkers on revolutionary struggle, colonialism, and racial difference in human history.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

“A strange, haunting mélange of analysis, revolutionary manifesto, metaphysics, prose poetry and literary criticism—and yet the nakedest of human cries.” —Newsweek

“A brilliant, vivid and hurt mind, walking the thin line that separates effective outrage from despair... As a writer he demonstrates how insidiously the problem of race, of color, connects with a whole range of words and images. . . . Yet it is Fanon the man, rather than the medical specialist or intellectual, who makes the book so hard to put down.” —Robert Coles, The New York Times Book Review

“A reasoned, explosive, and important book centered on the identity problem of the black man, by the author of a classic study of racism and colonialism, Wretched of the Earth.” —Publishers Weekly

“This book should be read by every black man with a desire to understand himself and the forces that conspire against him.”—Floyd McKissick, former national director, CORE

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780802150844
Publisher:
Grove/Atlantic, Inc.
Publication date:
01/28/1994
Pages:
232
Product dimensions:
5.44(w) x 8.22(h) x 0.63(d)

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

Frantz Fanon (1925–61) was born in the French Caribbean island of Martinique. He studied medicine and psychiatry in France and worked in a hospital in Algeria between 1953 and 1956. He passionately identified with Algeria's armed struggle for independence and this led him to write The Wretched of the Earth (1961) which became a manifesto for the Third World. Black Skin, White Masks was first published in France in 1952.

Ziauddin Sardar is Visiting Professor of Science Policy at Middlesex University and consulting editor of the prestigious journal Futures. He is a prolific writer and is the author of Cultural Studies for Beginners, Barbaric Others: A Manifesto on Western Racism and editor, with Jerome Ravetz, of Cyberfutures: Culture and Politics on the Information Superhighway.

 

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Black Skin, White Masks 4.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
DancingPalmtrees More than 1 year ago
Frantz Fanon February 11, 2009 Surprisingly I read Black Skin White Masks in two days. I had heard that this was a difficult book to read and understand but I did not have any trouble with it. Mr. Fanon did use plenty of medical terminologies however they could be understood within the context of the sentence. I did wish that Mr. Fanon had gone more into why certain African Americans were Expatriates in Paris during the 1920s to the 1950s. If France was so racist and biased as he state in his book why would Josephine Baker, Langston Hughes, Richard Wright, James Baldwin, Miles Davis and Charlie Parker choose to live there. I also wished he had included his thoughts on The Harlem Renaissance and writer Zora Neale Hurston. Monday, April 20, 2009 Excellent book. Some say his books are difficult to read but despite some of the medical/psychiatric terminologies he was always on point and what he writes is still relevant in today's world. He is a fantastic writer whose analogies and stories resonant with the 21st century reader. I look forward to reading his other books.
TulaneGirl More than 1 year ago
An absolutely must read for anyone of any race - it's not just for the black revolutionary. It's a well reasoned book with a clear understanding of black identity. For any minority struggling between assimilation and integration, this book puts things in perspective and hopefully helps make the non-minorities irrelevant in determining personal worth. For non-minorities, I hope it enlightens about history, emotion, and psyche. For all its polarizing passages, it ends on a hopeful message.
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