The Black Star Passes

The Black Star Passes

4.9 7
by John W. Campbell
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

A sky pirate armed with superior weapons of his own invention....First contact with an alien race dangerous enough to threaten the safety of two planets....The arrival of an unseen dark sun whose attendant marauders aimed at the very end of civilization in this Solar System....These were the three challenges that tested the skill and minds of the brilliant team of…  See more details below

Overview

A sky pirate armed with superior weapons of his own invention....First contact with an alien race dangerous enough to threaten the safety of two planets....The arrival of an unseen dark sun whose attendant marauders aimed at the very end of civilization in this Solar System....These were the three challenges that tested the skill and minds of the brilliant team of scientist-astronauts Arcot, Wade, and Morey. Their initial adventures are a classic of science-fiction which first brought the name of their author, John W. Campbell, into prominence as a master of the inventive imagination.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940016491134
Publisher:
Science Fiction Ebooks
Publication date:
04/18/2013
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
224
Sales rank:
1,321,629
File size:
177 KB

Meet the Author

JOHN W. CAMPBELL first started writing in 1930 when his first short story, When the Atoms Failed, was accepted by a science-fiction magazine. At that time he was twenty years old and still a student at college. As the title of the story indicates, he was even at that time occupied with the significance of atomic energy and nuclear physics.
For the next seven years, Campbell, bolstered by a scientific background that ran from childhood experiments, to study at Duke University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, wrote and sold science-fiction, achieving for himself an enviable reputation in the field.
In 1937 he became the editor of Astounding Stories magazine and applied himself at once to the task of bettering the magazine and the field of s-f writing in general. His influence on science-fiction since then cannot be underestimated. Today he still remains as the editor of that magazine's evolved and redesigned successor, Analog.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

The Black Star Passes 4.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 7 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Cloudedpaw padded in and sniffed the air. She smelled rabbit! She followed the trail until the rabbit came into view. She stalked it until she was as close as she dared. Then she sprang and sank her teeth into its neck. It died immediately. Cloudedpaw carried it back to Everdawn.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Kits? ~ Friskyshadow
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
V
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
She padds in
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Sheesh it didn't show calm yourself.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Scifi is often dated. The cutting edge speculation of yester-year rarely holds up to modern developments. In Black Star, the airplanes of the 23rd century (thats still 200 years from today) are driven by propellers, there is no concept of electronics, and the authors theory about the formation of planets seems almost silly. However, once you get past those sorts of things, there is a lot of interesting ideas in there, ones I haven't read in other scifi stories. Which, when you consider it was written in 1930, is remarkable. So if you can cut him some slack for not being prescient, you're in for an interesting fun read.