Black Students, Middle Class Teachers

( 3 )

Overview

This compelling look at the relationship between the majority of African American students and their teachers provides answers and solutions to the hard-hitting questions facing education in today's black and mixed-race communities. Are teachers prepared by their college education departments to teach African American children? Are schools designed for middle-class children and, if so, what are the implications for the 50 percent of African Americans who live below the poverty line? Is the major issue between ...
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Overview

This compelling look at the relationship between the majority of African American students and their teachers provides answers and solutions to the hard-hitting questions facing education in today's black and mixed-race communities. Are teachers prepared by their college education departments to teach African American children? Are schools designed for middle-class children and, if so, what are the implications for the 50 percent of African Americans who live below the poverty line? Is the major issue between teachers and students class or racial difference? Why do some of the lowest test scores come from classrooms where black educators are teaching black students? How can parents negotiate with schools to prevent having their children placed in special education programs? Also included are teaching techniques and a list of exemplary schools that are successfully educating African Americans.

Author Biography: Dr. Jawanza Kunjufu is the author of State of Emergency: We Must Save African American Men, Countering the Conspiracy to Destroy Black Boys, and Satan, I'm Taking Back my Health. He lives in Chicago.

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Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
Kunjufu, an educational consultant and author of several nonfiction books on African American affairs, offers another in the wide array of recently published books on why the educational system is failing minority children. Kunjufu's book examines why black children, more than 50 percent of whom live below the poverty line, are still lagging behind in educational achievement. He cites a variety of factors, including negative peer pressure, lack of parental involvement, school funding discrepancies, and even genetics. But much of the problem, he believes, stems from the fact that 83 percent of the elementary-school teacher population is made up of white, middle-class females. Low teacher expectations, mismatched teaching and learning styles, lack of time, tracking, and an irrelevant Eurocentric curriculum are, he claims, at the root of the problem. In the last chapter, Kunjufu provides examples of successful programs aimed at closing the achievement gap between blacks and the rest of the school-age population. While there are many books on educational improvement, this one provides a fresh view from a different perspective and is recommended for academic and public libraries.-Mark Bay, Cumberland Coll. Lib., Williamsburg, KY Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780913543818
  • Publisher: African American Images
  • Publication date: 9/1/2002
  • Pages: 200
  • Sales rank: 301,680
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.50 (h) x 0.36 (d)

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 3 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Posted January 2, 2010

    Jawanza Kunjufu's book

    I am currently reading, Black Students, Middle Class Teachers. At first I had a lot of personal troubles with Mr. Kunjufu's points in the early chapters of this book. At one point I had to set the book down and take a break, mostly because I felt like he was making a lot of excuses. After a few days of talking with peers at the high school I work in, I was able to get a better understanding of what Mr. Kunjufu was saying to his readers. I have come to realize what I need to do as an educator of African American students. I credit Mr. Kunjufu in helping me to realize my own short comings as a middle class educator. Later today I will be picking up another book that I believe is titled Keeping Black Boys Out of Special Education, which is also by Mr. Kunjufu.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 1, 2012

    Highly Recommended - you must check it out!!

    This is a very informative and helpful book. I have learned a lot and seriously recommend that everyone read it!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 15, 2006

    Educating African American Children

    I was very impressed with this book. I am a single African American parent and I'm constantly looking for information to help my child succeed in school. This book gives me a clear perspective from a educators point of view.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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