Black Teachers On Teaching

Overview


Black Teachers on Teaching is an honest and compelling account of the politics and philosophies involved in the education of black children during the last fifty years. Michele Foster talks to those who were the first to teach in desegregated southern schools and to others who taught in large urban districts, such as Boston, Los Angeles, and Philadelphia. All go on record about the losses and gains accompanying desegregation, the inspirations and rewards of teaching, and the challenges and solutions they see in ...
See more details below
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (23) from $1.99   
  • New (7) from $16.85   
  • Used (16) from $1.99   
Sending request ...

Overview


Black Teachers on Teaching is an honest and compelling account of the politics and philosophies involved in the education of black children during the last fifty years. Michele Foster talks to those who were the first to teach in desegregated southern schools and to others who taught in large urban districts, such as Boston, Los Angeles, and Philadelphia. All go on record about the losses and gains accompanying desegregation, the inspirations and rewards of teaching, and the challenges and solutions they see in the coming years.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"A balanced debate on the pros and cons of integration and its impact on the education of African American children." &#8212Booklist

"A must-read. . . . A tribute to unsung dreamkeepers, and a guide for those who look beyond the statistics for pieces of crystal." &#8212Emerge

"Foster lets teachers tell their stories, and their words are moving . . . powerful, and true." &#8212Teacher Magazine

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
How has the teaching profession been experienced and understood by black teachers? To answer her question, Foster (Unrelated Kin) conducted 20 "life history" interviews with black teachers between 1988 and 1996. Of interest not only to black teachers, parents and school administrators, Black Teachers on Teaching gives all readers frank firsthand reactions to school integration and its results for teachers and students, as well as an overview of blacks in education over much of this past century. For many of these teachers, integration has been a failure, not only depriving black children of the dedicated instruction of black teachers but also resulting in the firing or displacement of black staff. One interviewee recounts being sent to an east Texas school to fulfill legal requirements of integration, only to spend six months in an office, having been refused a teaching assignment because of the prejudice of white colleagues and protesting parents. Meanwhile, white teachers maintained their right to teach in the newly integrated schools. Over the years, many of these black teachers noted that bright black students were scorned or ignored by their white teachers and socially discriminated against by their white classmates. Many blacks of average ability equal to that of their white counterparts were relegated to special education or remedial classes. There are a couple of interviews that are superficial and could have been excluded, but for the most part Foster provides frontline reports on subjects that many people know only from a distance. (Feb.)
Library Journal
Through 20 "life history interviews," Foster (Growing Up African American in Catholic Schools, Teachers Coll. Pr., 1996) provides a look at how black teachers feel about teaching. She begins with "The Elders," who for the most part began teaching in the 1920s-40s. These six describe their own schooling as well as their teaching experiences during the beginnings of integration. "The Veterans" follow, detailing current trends and practices and sharing their stories and advice. Two "Novices" express their enthusiasm for teaching. While each narrative is different, certain themes run throughout the book, such as the need to encourage students-especially black students-to challenge themselves continuously. What's surprising is the number of interviewees who praise certain aspects of segregation. Foster will open some eyes to the reality of inequality in education. Recommended for most libraries, especially those with an emphasis on education.-Terry A. Christener, Hutchinson P.L., Kan.
Booknews
Interviews with 21 black educators born between 1905 and 1973, provide a candid look at the politics and philosophies of educating black children over the last 50 years. The veteran teachers describe the transition from segregated to integrated classrooms, while their younger colleagues reflect on the legacy left by these pioneers, and debate the advantages and disadvantages of education in integrated schools. No index. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781565844537
  • Publisher: New Press, The
  • Publication date: 4/15/1998
  • Pages: 240
  • Sales rank: 813,479
  • Product dimensions: 0.55 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 6.00 (d)

Meet the Author


Michele Foster is Sherman Family Endowed Chair in Urban Education Research and the executive director of the Urban Education Research Center at the University of Missouri–Kansas City. A frequent contributor to journals and books on education, she is the author of Black Teachers on Teaching (The New Press); the editor of Readings on Equal Education, vol. 11: Qualitative Investigations into Schools and Schooling; and a co-editor of Unrelated Kin: Ethnic and Gender Identity in Women’s Personal Narratives and Growing Up African American in Catholic School.
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Foreword
Acknowledgements
Introduction
Pt. I The Elders 1
Everett Dawson 3
Ora Benson 13
Ruby Middleton Forsythe 23
Madge Scott 37
Leroy Lovelace 45
Bernadine B. Morris 53
Pt. II The Veterans 63
Cheryl Thigpen 65
Ethel Tanner 73
Etta Joan Marks 83
Lorraine Lawrence 93
Edouard Plummer 101
Millicent Byard Gray 111
Pamela Otis Ogonu 123
Lerone Swift 133
Joelle Vanderall 143
Louise Mason 151
Bobbie Duvon 157
Mabel Bettie Moss 165
Pt. III The Novices 175
Leonard Collins 177
Ashallah Williams 183
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 9, 2008

    An Informative and Thought Provoking Book

    Always curious about the educational system, this book was informational and inspiring to me. This story also made me more aware of the serious job it is to be a teacher. I am currently doing course work to become an Early Childhood Educator, however I realize my passion is to be a Reading Specialist. Passion is what the teachers in Michelle Foster's book spoke of having a passion for what one is doing. I think the book should be required reading for anyone aspiring to go into the field of education.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)