Black Trillium (Trillium Series #1)

Black Trillium (Trillium Series #1)

3.6 3
by Marion Zimmer Bradley
     
 

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Ruwenda is a pleasant, peaceful land-but the magic of its guardian, the Archimage Binah, is waning.  Binah must pass along her protectorship to the triplet princess of Ruwenda.  She bestows upon the infant girls the power of the rare and mystical Black Trillium-badge of the royal house, symbol of an ancient magic.  While the sisters

Overview

Ruwenda is a pleasant, peaceful land-but the magic of its guardian, the Archimage Binah, is waning.  Binah must pass along her protectorship to the triplet princess of Ruwenda.  She bestows upon the infant girls the power of the rare and mystical Black Trillium-badge of the royal house, symbol of an ancient magic.  While the sisters blossom into beautiful young women, neighboring Labornok use a dark magician to sunder Binah's protection. As invaders pour into Ruwenda, the Archimage orders the princesses to flee-and changes them to search for three magical talismans which when brought together will be their only chance to regain their kingdom and free its people.   Each must accomplish her task separately-and to succeed, each must also confront and conquer the limits of her own soul.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Three masters of science fiction and fantasy collaborated on this mildly diverting quest novel, their failure to produce a more compelling tale demonstrating the pitfalls of writing by committee. The kingdom of Ruwenda is attacked by neighboring Labornok, whose king has long been jealous of its wealth and prosperity. Ruwenda's rulers are brutally slain, but their daughters--the three Petals of the Living Trillium, prophesied to save their country in a time of peril--flee to the Archimage Binah, who directs them to their magic talismans. Each accompanied by a childhood companion, Oddlings of the area's aboriginal races, the girls must conquer their weaknesses: the eldest, her intellectual arrogance; the middle sister, her tendency to act before thinking; the youngest, her great timidity. Their enemies pursue them, led by a sorcerer seeking ancient secrets hidden in the abandoned cities. Throughout appear intimations that some of the magic is a relic of an old technology, possibly ours. The three princesses are little more than a collection of attributes, the love story is a bore and the many races of Oddlings are barely distinguishable. (Aug.)
Library Journal
The birth of triplets--three princesses--to the King and Queen of Ruwanda heralds a great and fearful destiny for the kingdom of the Mazy Mire. Bradley, Andre Norton, and Julian May--three stellar sf authors--combine their talents in a classic fantasy quest involving mysterious wizards, rites of passage, and the salvation of a kingdom. Although not entirely bereft of male protagonists, this novel projects a gentle brand of feminism along with a healthy dose of standard sword and sorcery. Purchase where the authors are popular. Previewed in Prepub Alert, LJ 4/1/90.
School Library Journal
YA-- When three such distinguished ladies collaborate, we ignore them at our peril. Nevertheless, this is a slight work, only hinting at the depths of which these authors are capable. It is, however, a fairy tale that will be highly enjoyable to young women, with the princesses providing a surrogate for almost any temperment, and a busy plot.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780553290790
Publisher:
Random House Publishing Group
Publication date:
06/03/1991
Series:
Trillium Series, #1
Pages:
512
Product dimensions:
4.18(w) x 6.81(h) x 1.15(d)

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Black Trillium (Trillium Series #1) 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
This was an exciting book! I was so caught up in the many travels and adventures the princesses and others went through. I felt every one got what they deserved in the end, good or bad. The end was slightly surprising, because I thought it would conclude with the wizard in a somewhat different position. But I won't destroy the mystery of the ending for anyone interested in reading the book. ;-) (P.S. I hope my French is correct up there in my personal information.)