The Blackgod

The Blackgod

4.2 5
by J. Gregory Keyes, David A. Cherry
     
 

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Prepare to encounter a world where magic springs from earth and sky and water, and where danger, heartache, fear, and friendship each wait to claim their place in the grand design of life. J. Gregory Keyes pursues a tale as big as life in the stunning sequel to The Waterborn.

The River flowed from the mountains to the distant sea, and everywhere he touched,

Overview

Prepare to encounter a world where magic springs from earth and sky and water, and where danger, heartache, fear, and friendship each wait to claim their place in the grand design of life. J. Gregory Keyes pursues a tale as big as life in the stunning sequel to The Waterborn.

The River flowed from the mountains to the distant sea, and everywhere he touched, he ruled. Powerful and hungry, he had scoured every rival godling from the land. But the world beyond the River's reach was a riot of gods and ghosts and other deities, large and small. Strange spirits jostled and contended with each other, and with the humans who shared their range.

Into this rich and dangerously open land came a surprising refugee: Hezhi, the River's own daughter.

When the magic that was her heritage awakened in her back in the glittering palace of imperial Nhol, Hezhi fled for her life. With Perkar, a youth in search of honor, and loyal Tsem, her half-Giant bodyguard, she sought refuge among the barbarian Mang. She had hoped for the freedom to build a life of her own, but in these demon-haunted hinterlands, every bubbling spring, crevasse, and hillock boasted some spirit. Until she learned to wield the powers of her birthright, she would be vulnerable to any arcane attack. Hezhi's sanity, and her very soul, would be at risk.

Meanwhile, grisly danger followed her from the world she thought she had escaped. The River focused all his might and cunning on the task of finding his wayward child.

From the depth of his yearning, the River plotted to take Hezhi alive.

For Perkar, her champion, he had no such benign end in view ...

Only the Blackgod saw a way for Hezhi and Perkar to defeat the River, once and for all. But he was a creature of guile and limitless duplicity; to trust him might be the most perilous move they could make. Perkar knew that better than anyone else -- better, at least, than anyone still alive ...

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Cahners\\Publishers_Weekly
Keyes's epic sequel to The Waterborn unfolds in an animistic world of elemental nature gods and of humans and part-humans generally at war. Although filled with fantastic action, the novel is extraordinary for the force and originality of its descriptions of internal impressions. Keyes's writing is impeded near the beginning by massive references to the prequel, and the dissonance between his world's animism and our own rational worldview draws Keyes into tenuous theologizing here and there. But the dramatic flow is prodigious. Hezhi, the pubescent Nholish princess marked for horrific transformation by her lineage to the River, first hides from the River among the horse-worshipping plains folk, the Mang; then, assisted by shaman Brother Horse to evoke and control her own shamanic power, she seeks to confront the River at its source. Meanwhile, Hezhi's would-be lover and failed assassin, now a horrid undead creature named Ghe-a wonderful, Dostoyevskian character, at once repelling and touching-tracks her into the mountains at the River's bidding. The ancient priesthood of Nhol and its imperial rulers become caught in a strange, many-sided power struggle over Hezhi's fate. Dreams and visions turn into tools of war, and tribal conflicts complicate matters. The resolution of the many strands, though exciting, is vitiated by a sense of random invention. Still, Keyes's mastery of the internal lives of his characters and his artful, theatrical shifts of point of view give this huge tale an intimate feel, although remote, chthonic forces are everywhere at work.
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Keyes's epic sequel to The Waterborn unfolds in an animistic world of elemental nature gods and of humans and part-humans generally at war. Although filled with fantastic action, the novel is extraordinary for the force and originality of its descriptions of internal impressions. Keyes's writing is impeded near the beginning by massive references to the prequel, and the dissonance between his world's animism and our own rational worldview draws Keyes into tenuous theologizing here and there. But the dramatic flow is prodigious. Hezhi, the pubescent Nholish princess marked for horrific transformation by her lineage to the River, first hides from the River among the horse-worshipping plains folk, the Mang; then, assisted by shaman Brother Horse to evoke and control her own shamanic power, she seeks to confront the River at its source. Meanwhile, Hezhi's would-be lover and failed assassin, now a horrid undead creature named Ghea wonderful, Dostoyevskian character, at once repelling and touchingtracks her into the mountains at the River's bidding. The ancient priesthood of Nhol and its imperial rulers become caught in a strange, many-sided power struggle over Hezhi's fate. Dreams and visions turn into tools of war, and tribal conflicts complicate matters. The resolution of the many strands, though exciting, is vitiated by a sense of random invention. Still, Keyes's mastery of the internal lives of his characters and his artful, theatrical shifts of point of view give this huge tale an intimate feel, although remote, chthonic forces are everywhere at work. (Apr.)
Library Journal
In this sequel to The Waterborn (LJ 6/15/96) Hezhi, the daughter of the powerful River that flows throughout the land, escapes from the imperial palace in Nhol and her destiny to join with the River. Hiding among the Mang horsemen with her bodyguard, Hezhi must learn to wield her waterborn power. Blackgod, the Raven, reveals how she can defeat the River with the help of Perkar, a cattleman, by traveling to the headwaters in the mountains. Enriched by spiritualism, mystery, and cultural detail, this fantasy belongs in most collections.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780345403940
Publisher:
Random House Publishing Group
Publication date:
04/22/1997
Series:
Chosen of the Changeling Series, #2
Pages:
559
Product dimensions:
6.66(w) x 9.59(h) x 1.87(d)

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

J. Gregory Keyes is a teacher at the University of Georgia and is pursuing a Ph.D. in the anthropology of belief systems and mythology. He was born in Mississippi and raised there and on a Navajo reservation in Arizona. He is the author of The Waterborn.

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Blackgod (Chosen of the Changeling Series) 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
Anonymous 7 months ago
Good but rather frustrating throughout both books. It's hard to really like any of the characters and they make so many bad decisions and never seem to learn from any of them. Main characters are sort of willfully stupid. Understandable for their ages, but makes for hard reading as you want to just reach through the pages and slap everyone.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
Keyes made an excellent book with the Waterborn with and original story line and original characters. In the Blackgod he keeps up the excellence and is a great respite from traditional books with the Medieval Ages all about them. It ties up all loose ends and makes a surprising ending. All in all this book is abound with twists and turns and is recommended to anyone who reads.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The first book he wrote was outstanding ( the waterborn) the second matched up or, maybe, even surpassed its 1st. The book is about now how Hezhi is finally away from the changeling she and Perkar must fight other obstacles to keep her safe and defeat the Changeling once and for all. This book is trully breath taking, the series is now my favorite book of all time. At times I wanted to put it down , even force myself to put it down, because I was sad to see it come to an end.