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Blacksad: A Silent Hell
     

Blacksad: A Silent Hell

5.0 1
by Juan Díaz Canales
 

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Detective John Blacksad returns, with a new case that takes him to a 1950s New Orleans filled with hot jazz and cold-blooded murder! Hired to discover the fate of a celebrated pianist, Blacksad finds his most dangerous mystery yet in the midst of drugs, voodoo, the rollicking atmosphere of Mardi Gras, and the dark underbelly that it hides!

* Features an

Overview

Detective John Blacksad returns, with a new case that takes him to a 1950s New Orleans filled with hot jazz and cold-blooded murder! Hired to discover the fate of a celebrated pianist, Blacksad finds his most dangerous mystery yet in the midst of drugs, voodoo, the rollicking atmosphere of Mardi Gras, and the dark underbelly that it hides!

* Features an extensive making-of section, with tons of prelim sketches and watercolor studies.

* 2011 Eisner and Harvey Award-winner!

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
If Walt Disney ever made an adult-themed, anthropomorphic Philip Marlowe movie, it might resemble this popular series. In this fourth outing for the titular feline detective, Blacksad is enlisted to locate a missing, drug-addicted blues musician in 1950s New Orleans. He uncovers an old conspiracy involving a poisonous “miracle medicine” and its effect on the musical legacy of the Big Easy; the story parallels the history of drug abuse among great American blues and jazz musicians. Canales’s plot is populated by a colorful mixture of Americana: burlesque houses, snake-oil merchants, Mardi Gras, and the haunted soul of the blues are all key elements in this vibrant, atmospheric noir mystery. The authentic local details of Guarnido’s art are balanced by whimsical character design and humor reminiscent of early Disney animation. The volume also contains a lengthy “behind the scenes” feature in which the creators present early watercolor roughs of the story paired with text describing their process and the particular challenges—both narrative and visual—posed by this story. Informed by deep reading of genre fiction and American cultural history, it’s another hit for Blacksad. (July)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781621156802
Publisher:
Dark Horse Comics
Publication date:
07/24/2012
Series:
Blacksad Series , #4
Sold by:
Penguin Random House Publisher Services
Format:
NOOK Book
Sales rank:
1,244,239
File size:
45 MB
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Blacksad: A Silent Hell 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
CuteFluffyMurderNoodle More than 1 year ago
Blacksad deserved a much needed rest following 2005's Red Soul. After 3 massively successful volumes, a five year hiatus felt appropriate. Some feared that the series would lose creative steam after such a long break. Thankfully, A Silent Hell lost no steam. The series was still as fresh as ever. In this fourth story, Blacksad and his weasel friend, Weekly, fly to the jazz scene in New Orleans, where they are hired by a terminally ill music agent named Faust LaChapelle to find missing pianist, Sebastian Fletcher, who also goes by "Little Hand" due to his deformed arm that's smaller than the other. During the search, they find out that a mysterious man has been giving Sebastian deadly drugs. On top of that, his friends are murdered in staged suicides. I would continue further but then I would be going into major spoilers so that's all I'm gonna say about the plot. One thing about the story that can be annoying is that it's told anachronically so it's out of order purposely. However, after a few reads, you'll be able to figure out what's going on. The best part, like in the past volumes, is the fantastic artwork. This is among my favorite artistic representations of New Orleans. Scenes taking place at night or day are lovely sights to look at. Even though this series was made by Europeans, it's clear that they definitely did their homework. I personally enjoy it better than most American representations. There are some nice extras to finish off this 2012 edition of the 2010 book. There are 2 one-off mini comics from 2003 to 2004, Like Cats and Dogs and Spit at the Sky respectively. The major one is a fully translated art book called The Watercolor Story, which is an in-depth look at the making of A Silent Hell that's written by the artist himself, Juanjo Guarnido. It's filled with many W.I.P. versions of panels and paint spots that show what he was thinking for lighting effects and color schemes for the designs. He also touches on some complications and how he moved around them. Overall, A Silent Hell is a fine addition to the series and the "making of" art book makes this a must-own for anyone into comics.