Blade Runner [Original Soundtrack]

Blade Runner [Original Soundtrack]

5.0 4
by Vangelis
     
 

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Ridley Scott's visually imaginative science fiction film has become a classic of '80s cinema since its original release and initial failure at the box office. The evocative, spellbinding score by Vangelis -- who had just come off his Oscar-winning triumph on CHARIOTS OF FIRE the preceding year -- wasn't officially released until 1994.…  See more details below

Overview

Ridley Scott's visually imaginative science fiction film has become a classic of '80s cinema since its original release and initial failure at the box office. The evocative, spellbinding score by Vangelis -- who had just come off his Oscar-winning triumph on CHARIOTS OF FIRE the preceding year -- wasn't officially released until 1994. Vangelis's score is a marvel of electronic sounds and textures, incorporating ethnic Japanese instrumentation ("Tales of the Future"), pulsating themes ("Blade Runner [End Titles]"), and surprisingly lyrical tracks best described as "futuristic jazz" ("Memories of Green," "Love Theme"). To make the soundtrack more cohesive, Vangelis added new music ("Rachel's Song") specifically for the album. Some film dialogue also finds its way onto this recording, which fortunately doesn't detract from the power of the striking score.

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Zac Johnson
Arriving 12 years after the release of the film, Vangelis' soundtrack to the 1982 futuristic noir detective thriller Blade Runner is as bleak and electronically chilling as the film itself. By subtly interspersing clips of dialogue and sounds from the film, Vangelis creates haunting soundscapes with whispered subtexts and sweeping revelations, drawing inspiration from Middle Eastern textures and evoking neo-classical structures. Often cold and forlorn, the listener can almost hear the indifferent winds blowing through the neon and metal cityscapes of Los Angeles in 2019. The sultry, saxophone-driven "Love Theme" has since gone on as one of the composer's most recognized pieces and stands alone as one of the few warm refuges on an otherwise darkly cold (but beautiful) score. An unfortunate inclusion of the 1930s-inspired ballad "One More Kiss, Dear" interrupts the futuristic synthesized flow of the album with a muted trumpet and Rudy Vall�e-style croon. However well done (and appropriate in the movie), a forlorn love song that sounds as if it is playing on a distant Philco radio in The Waltons' living room jarringly breaks the mood of the album momentarily (although with CD technology, this distraction is easily bypassed). Fans of Ridley Scott's groundbreaking film (as well as those interested in the evolution of electronic music) will warmly take this recording into their plastic-carbide-alloy hearts.

Product Details

Release Date:
06/21/1994
Label:
Atlantic
UPC:
0075678262326
catalogNumber:
82623
Rank:
32283

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Blade Runner 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
SleepDreamWrite More than 1 year ago
The music really sets the mood and atmosphere for the movie that it just works and is one of the highlights of the movie. One of my favorite movie soundtracks. Definitely worth a listen.
Guest More than 1 year ago
My FAVORITE movie of all time and a great soundtrack. New American Orchestra did a good job at trying to capture the darkness of 21st century L.A., but they just could not convey the imagery of Ridley Scott's chilling glimpse the way Vangelis could. I was VERY happy to see that he finally deceided to release it after so many years. It has a definate place on my CD shelf.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Vangelis performed a spectacular job when creating the score for Blade Runner. His other noteble efforts such as The Bounty adds to his ability to create a mood, a chemistry, or an emotional feeling when visualizing the films. Listening to different generas of music such as space, allows the endorphins to flow thus creating healing and well being in individuals.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago