Blender 2.5 Project Development Hotshot

Blender 2.5 Project Development Hotshot

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by John Edison Herre O Velasco
     
 
If you can perform basic tasks with Blender 3D and want to create more detailed, richer, polished results this book is for you. It is also useful if you are an advanced user of another 3D package wanting to get up and running with Blender 3D. The ten chapters cover separate projects: rendering a starship shield impact, a fighter aircraft flying through a storm, car

Overview

If you can perform basic tasks with Blender 3D and want to create more detailed, richer, polished results this book is for you. It is also useful if you are an advanced user of another 3D package wanting to get up and running with Blender 3D. The ten chapters cover separate projects: rendering a starship shield impact, a fighter aircraft flying through a storm, car modeling and shading, creating a professional-looking trailer, creating an interactive architectural walkthrough using the game engine, rendering a detailed earth view from space, modeling and rendering a kitchen, modeling and texturing a toon character, rigging and animating a toon character, and modeling and texturing a snail. Each chapter is divided into tasks needed to accomplish the final result, fully described with guiding diagrams and screenshots. The final part of each task and chapter discusses technical aspects and key concepts. Each chapter also includes a list of suggested challenges to take the project further.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781849513104
Publisher:
Packt Publishing
Publication date:
05/14/2011
Pages:
332
Product dimensions:
7.50(w) x 9.25(h) x 0.69(d)

Meet the Author

John E. Herre�o Velasco is a 27 year old who developed, at the early age of 13, a deep curiosity for the "magical" things that modern digital computers can do. He recently graduated as an Electronics Engineer from the National University of Colombia, which helped him understand how computers are built, and studied by himself some principles on software development to get to know how to get the most out of them. He became interested in Blender 3D after finding version 1.72 bundled in a magazine CD bought for a very different reason and has been learning since then from the awesome community of users hanging out on Internet forums and writing tutorials. Today, he's highly convinced of the power that Open Source Software and the business models around it have to improve the general quality of life in developing countries. But, above all, he's just a human being wanting to know and serve Jesus Christ. Currently he spends most of his time working from home, doing Drupal web development and Blender Training, along with some custom software development. I want to express my gratitude to my parents Ramiro and Lucela, my brother Wbeimar and my sister Dayana for being such a great blessing from God and the greatest encouragement I have found. I would also like to thank the team at Packt: Steven Wilding for starting this project and providing me some good guidance to outline the contents, Rebecca Sawant and Shubhanjan Chatterjee for their patience on my permanent missing of deadlines and Susmita Panda for the very good and clear feedback on the produced material. Finally, I would like to thank my current employer, Garc�a Iguar�n Asociados S.A.S., for their continued support and encouragement on this project.

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Blender 2.5 Project Development Hotshot 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Boudville More than 1 year ago
Look, the author does not waste any time going over elementary 2 dimensional material using Blender 2.5. Instead, he takes the reader and jumps right into 8 projects [case studies], where each is intrinsically a 3 dimensional object. What you'll find is that the projects involve a common task of making a mesh or meshes that define an object. So you get accustomed to seeing wireframe diagrams, where the rendering is turned off, so that the meshes are explicitly visible. Of course, while the mesh is the surfaces of the object, you will still need to define the properties of that surface, where typically these are the properties germane to how the surface will look under external illumination. So you learn how to use the Blender menus that can see the shading properties, like the scattering, emissivity and reflection. Blender also lets you define 3 colours for a surface - under emission, reflection and transmission. Each is in RGB format and can be set independently. Some earlier rendering packages did not give you this amount of leeway, so Blender is quite nice in this regards. What is also useful about the chapters is that they end with advanced suggestions on how to take the steps described in the chapter and then add refinements in the details. If you are serious about learning Blender 2.5, you should partake of these problems. What you'll find is the common experience of many graphic artists - that these typically smaller details eat up much of your coding time. It forces you to thoroughly learn Blender. These little details add crucial verisimilitude to the final object. As a bonus, while the book only covers 8 projects, there are 2 others on the associated website. If you find yourself able to do the book's projects, and want to take your skills further, then the latter projects might be worth perusing.