Blender Bible

Overview

More than 400 taste-tempting recipes for a household blender.

More than five million blenders are sold each year in North America. Whether a blender is used to make wonderful mixed drinks or healthy baby food, it is one of the most widely used kitchen appliances.

The ...

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Overview

More than 400 taste-tempting recipes for a household blender.

More than five million blenders are sold each year in North America. Whether a blender is used to make wonderful mixed drinks or healthy baby food, it is one of the most widely used kitchen appliances.

The Blender Bible is a comprehensive compendium that features more than 400 great recipes:

  • 100 mixed drinks
  • 100 baby foods
  • 100 soups, sauces and marinades
  • 100 other tempting recipes.

This cookbook gives a wide range of recipes to increase the use of this versatile and powerful machine, reflecting the latest research that baby food and mixed drinks each account for 40% of blender use.

Following in the successful tradition of The Juicing Bible and The Smoothies Bible this book offers a wide range of easy-to-use, kitchen-tested recipes.

The Blender Bible is the ideal recipe book for the basic kitchen reference library.

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Editorial Reviews

Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
400 recipes that illustrate the versatility of the blender. One whole chapter is devoted just to baby food.
Washington Post - Bonnie S. Benwick
The recipes are simple to follow, cover a lot of ethnic territory and follow the blender's basic appeal: Throw stuff in, whirr and pour it out. Someone who's not so comfortable in the kitchen would find these recipes doable.
Today's Dietitian
The book is creative... A nice addition to anyone's cookbook collection and would assist blender owners everywhere.
Advice Sisters
[A book] from Robert Rose that can help you entertain weekend guests, and add some fun into your everyday menus. This book isn't just a bible of drink recipes, it contains recipes for 100 soups sauces and marinades, 100 baby foods, 100 miscellaneous recipes, and 100 of the blender drink recipes contained in 400 Blender Cocktails. While most of the recipes are easy to make, the book tries too hard to cover too much ground (e.g. if you want a book of baby food recipes, mixing them into a book with drink recipes, seems a bit weird). And, some of the recipes, most notably for salad dressings, can mostly be mixed by hand, thereby avoiding the need to lug out a heavy blender, and then do the clean-up. But for a newlywed couple who has just received probably more than one blender, it does offer lots of creative ways to use this must-have household appliance. Tofu Eggnog or Cream of Kohlrabi soup, anyone?
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780778801092
  • Publisher: Rose, Robert Incorporated
  • Publication date: 5/7/2005
  • Pages: 384
  • Sales rank: 903,607
  • Product dimensions: 7.00 (w) x 10.00 (h) x 1.12 (d)

Meet the Author

Andrew Chase is the author of Asian Bistro and Associate Food Editor for Canadian Living Magazine. He lives in Toronto.

Nicole Young is an experienced recipe developer and food stylist and gives regular seminars on making baby food.

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Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
Introduction

Appetizers, Dips and Spreads

[32 recipes]

Salad Dressings

[19 recipes]

Condiments, Sauces and Marinades

[48 recipes]

Soups

[58 recipes]

Meals

  • Breakfast [6 recipes]
  • Dinner Entrees [16 recipes]
  • Side Dishes [12 recipes]

Desserts and Sweet Sauces

[41 recipes]

Smoothies and Other Drinks

[57 recipes]

Cocktails

[118 recipes]

Baby Food

  • Introduction to Baby Food
  • Six Months and Older [66 recipes]
  • Eight Months and Older [35 recipes]
  • Nine Months and Older [14 recipes]
  • Twelve Months and Older [9 recipes]

General Index
Baby Food Index

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Preface

Introduction

With the introduction of the household blender in the 1930s, blenders became a fixture in North American kitchens. But since the popularization of food processors in the 70s, blenders have been gradually and mistakenly relegated to the status of mere beverage mixers, and their many other uses have been neglected. Blenders are an indispensable and extremely convenient kitchen tool. From grinding spices to puréeing soups to mixing beverages to making batter, blenders help keep your cooking on a smooth track. So find your blender a place on the kitchen counter!

In my many years as restaurant chef and recipe writer, I have learned to depend on the blender. Nothing grinds large batches of spices like a blender, and no other tool can chop harder ingredients, such as lemon grass, to a fine, digestible consistency. Blenders allow you to make wonderful homemade peanut buffer, mayonnaise and pepper purée. Dips,
spreads and simple pasta sauces such as tomato sauce and pesto become a breeze; soups can be puréed in seconds. Curry pastes no longer require strenuous and time-consuming work with a mortar and pestle — many Indian households in North America now rely heavily on the blender for food preparation. Healthy breakfast drinks and quick desserts are a bonus.

Blenders are extremely useful in basic food preparation:

  • Making bread crumbs: Break stale and dry bread into small pieces by hand. Pulse in 1-cup (250 mL) batches to desired consistency. (You can make cookie and cracker crumbs the same way)
  • Grating hard cheese: Cube cheese in 1/2-inch (1 cm) pieces. Blend on high speed in 1/2-cup (1 25 mL) batches.
  • Grinding coffee: Grind coffee on high speed in 1-cup (250 mL) batches until desired consistency.
  • Grinding spices: Grind spices on high speed in 1/4-cup (50 mL) to
    1/2-cup (125 mL) batches until desired consistency.
  • Whipping cream: Whip 1 cup (250 mL) cream on low speed until thick and smooth.
  • Chopping nuts: Pulse 1/2 cup (125 mL) to 1 cup (250 mL) nuts several times, scraping down sides with a spatula between each pulsing.
  • Making mushroom powder: Break up 1 oz (30 g) dried mushrooms into small pieces by hand. Pulse on high speed to a fine powder. Use as a seasoning in sauces to give a rich mushroom flavor.
  • Preparing dried tomato paste: Pour 3/4 cup (1 75 mL) boiling water over 1 oz (30 g) dried (oven-dried or sun-dried) tomatoes. Let stand until soft, about 20 minutes. Purée on high speed until smooth, then strain through fine sieve. Use this sweet and intensely flavored purée in place of tomato paste.

When using your blender, you may be concerned about which speed to use. In this book, I
have chosen to simplify the speed question by indicating only low or high speeds. In general, low speed is ideal for finely chopping ingredients. High speed makes fine purées. When high-speed blending is indicated, you might want to start on a lower speed and increase to high when ingredients are finely chopped. To avoid spillage when blending at high speed, fill the blender only half-full (this is especially important with hot ingredients). If your blender has intermediate speeds, you can experiment to see which speed works best for the food at hand. There is no magic about it: longer blending at a lower speed will give pretty much the same results as shorter blending at high speed. Whenever you use your blender, stop it partway through blending to see if the ingredients need to be scraped down with a spatula. This will ensure that the ingredients are evenly blended.

To clean your blender, fill it with hot water and let it run for about 1 minute. Then put it in the dishwasher or wash by hand. Or, if your blender base unscrews from the jug, disassemble it, wash the components separately and allow them to dry thoroughly before reassembling.

In this book, you will find an eclectic collection of excellent recipes, inspired by food from around the world. I have chosen to exclude recipes in which the blender could have been used but isn't an indispensable tool — each recipe in the book requires a blender to produce the best results.

You will undoubtedly discover even more uses for your blender as you cook with these recipes. I hope you find inspiration and surprises in these pages!

- Andrew Chase

Read More Show Less

Introduction

Introduction

With the introduction of the household blender in the 1930s, blenders became a fixture in North American kitchens. But since the popularization of food processors in the 70s, blenders have been gradually and mistakenly relegated to the status of mere beverage mixers, and their many other uses have been neglected. Blenders are an indispensable and extremely convenient kitchen tool. From grinding spices to puréeing soups to mixing beverages to making batter, blenders help keep your cooking on a smooth track. So find your blender a place on the kitchen counter!

In my many years as restaurant chef and recipe writer, I have learned to depend on the blender. Nothing grinds large batches of spices like a blender, and no other tool can chop harder ingredients, such as lemon grass, to a fine, digestible consistency. Blenders allow you to make wonderful homemade peanut buffer, mayonnaise and pepper purée. Dips, spreads and simple pasta sauces such as tomato sauce and pesto become a breeze; soups can be puréed in seconds. Curry pastes no longer require strenuous and time-consuming work with a mortar and pestle -- many Indian households in North America now rely heavily on the blender for food preparation. Healthy breakfast drinks and quick desserts are a bonus.

Blenders are extremely useful in basic food preparation:

  • Making bread crumbs: Break stale and dry bread into small pieces by hand. Pulse in 1-cup (250 mL) batches to desired consistency. (You can make cookie and cracker crumbs the same way)
  • Grating hard cheese: Cube cheese in 1/2-inch (1 cm) pieces. Blend on high speed in 1/2-cup (1 25 mL) batches.
  • Grinding coffee:Grind coffee on high speed in 1-cup (250 mL) batches until desired consistency.
  • Grinding spices: Grind spices on high speed in 1/4-cup (50 mL) to 1/2-cup (125 mL) batches until desired consistency.
  • Whipping cream: Whip 1 cup (250 mL) cream on low speed until thick and smooth.
  • Chopping nuts: Pulse 1/2 cup (125 mL) to 1 cup (250 mL) nuts several times, scraping down sides with a spatula between each pulsing.
  • Making mushroom powder: Break up 1 oz (30 g) dried mushrooms into small pieces by hand. Pulse on high speed to a fine powder. Use as a seasoning in sauces to give a rich mushroom flavor.
  • Preparing dried tomato paste: Pour 3/4 cup (1 75 mL) boiling water over 1 oz (30 g) dried (oven-dried or sun-dried) tomatoes. Let stand until soft, about 20 minutes. Purée on high speed until smooth, then strain through fine sieve. Use this sweet and intensely flavored purée in place of tomato paste.

When using your blender, you may be concerned about which speed to use. In this book, I have chosen to simplify the speed question by indicating only low or high speeds. In general, low speed is ideal for finely chopping ingredients. High speed makes fine purées. When high-speed blending is indicated, you might want to start on a lower speed and increase to high when ingredients are finely chopped. To avoid spillage when blending at high speed, fill the blender only half-full (this is especially important with hot ingredients). If your blender has intermediate speeds, you can experiment to see which speed works best for the food at hand. There is no magic about it: longer blending at a lower speed will give pretty much the same results as shorter blending at high speed. Whenever you use your blender, stop it partway through blending to see if the ingredients need to be scraped down with a spatula. This will ensure that the ingredients are evenly blended.

To clean your blender, fill it with hot water and let it run for about 1 minute. Then put it in the dishwasher or wash by hand. Or, if your blender base unscrews from the jug, disassemble it, wash the components separately and allow them to dry thoroughly before reassembling.

In this book, you will find an eclectic collection of excellent recipes, inspired by food from around the world. I have chosen to exclude recipes in which the blender could have been used but isn't an indispensable tool -- each recipe in the book requires a blender to produce the best results.

You will undoubtedly discover even more uses for your blender as you cook with these recipes. I hope you find inspiration and surprises in these pages!

- Andrew Chase

Read More Show Less

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