Blind Faith [2000 Deluxe Edition]

( 2 )

Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - David Sprague
The term "supergroup" was coined to describe this short-lived but brilliant aggregation, which hit No. 1 with their self-titled debut and disappeared just as quickly -- but not without leaving some tantalizing sonic artifacts that are finally going on public display. This artfully packaged two-disc set, which includes a 28-page booklet with a lengthy essay, an annotated track listing, and lots of photos, doesn't merely dress up Blind Faith with a few outtakes: Rather, it adds an entire disc's worth of admittedly unpolished jamming that hints where Eric Clapton, Steve Winwood, and company might have gone, given the chance. The group's extant album is joined on disc one ...
See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (CD)
  • All (1) from $87.85   
  • New (1) from $87.85   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$87.85
Seller since 2010

Feedback rating:

(244)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
AUDIO CD New 731454952927 NEW/SEALED & in Excellent Condition-BUY NOW and REMEMBER WHEN ***

Ships from: Geneva, IL

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by

Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - David Sprague
The term "supergroup" was coined to describe this short-lived but brilliant aggregation, which hit No. 1 with their self-titled debut and disappeared just as quickly -- but not without leaving some tantalizing sonic artifacts that are finally going on public display. This artfully packaged two-disc set, which includes a 28-page booklet with a lengthy essay, an annotated track listing, and lots of photos, doesn't merely dress up Blind Faith with a few outtakes: Rather, it adds an entire disc's worth of admittedly unpolished jamming that hints where Eric Clapton, Steve Winwood, and company might have gone, given the chance. The group's extant album is joined on disc one by a handful of previously unreleased material, highlighted by two versions of "Sleeping in the Ground." The first, a gentle Beatlesque meander, would have fit in nicely on the era's FM radio, while the second, a doomy Chicago-styled blues, has considerably more heft. The second disc, however, is where folks who pine for free-form radio will have a field day. Comprised of four unstructured jams, each clocking in at more than ten minutes in length, the tribal, rhythm-based disc shows both the seeds of Winwood's future work in Traffic and the burgeoning world music affinity of drummer Ginger Baker. It goes down nice and easy, but it's most assuredly not easy listening.
All Music Guide
Blind Faith's lone album is often considered vivid proof as to why superstar collaborations simply don't work, but that is a little unfair -- in contrast to, say, Chess Records' various Super Blues releases, which stuck top musicians such as Muddy Waters and Howlin' Wolf together in awkward combos that they didn't really want to be part of, the guys in Blind Faith really were trying to work together on a long-term basis, and had an affinity for each other's work; the group just never had the time to evolve properly. And in retrospect, the album does have something to offer, including two songs that are touchstones of classic late-'60s rock: "Can't Find My Way Home" and "Presence of the Lord," not to mention the bracing "Sea of Joy." "Had to Cry Today" is also pretty effective, as is the Buddy Holly cover "Well All Right." Still, for those who subscribe to conventional rock critic doctrine, it may seem a little strange that an album as muddied as Blind Faith was given this lavish Deluxe Edition, containing basically everything capable of being released that the group cut during these sessions. This expanded edition will not change any minds; just on principle, it may even sour some open-minded listeners who have a distaste for extended, seemingly endless jams; in the latter regard, anyone so inclined should probably skip all but the third track on the second disc entirely, since three of the four jams that comprise the nearly hourlong platter are the least interesting of the bonus materials, even if some moments work well -- Eric Clapton's electric guitar playing is always interesting, and when Steve Winwood's organ kicks in there's a fair degree of excitement, though not without a lot of meandering before and after. But the bonus tracks appended to the basic album on the first disc -- which runs a whopping 75 minutes -- are a different matter. These include two previously unreleased versions of "Sleeping in the Ground" the one on Crossroads is missing, an electric version of "Can't Find My Way Home" that's just about worth the price of admission, and "Time Winds." If one compares this double-disc set to, say, The Layla Sessions triple-CD box, there's more here, if only because this group still had so many rough edges to work out that are worth a listen, whereas the completed Derek & the Dominos Layla album did, indeed, distill down the best of that band's work. With Blind Faith, there was still a lot of ground to cover musically, although "Acoustic Jam" will probably not be on too many listeners' playlists more than once or twice, except for some aspects of Eric Clapton's and Rick Grech's playing -- this track may be the earliest instance albeit an unintended one, as it wasn't ever supposed to see the light of day justifying the criticism that sometimes gets hung on Steve Winwood's multi-instrumentalist status, that he is a jack of all trades and master of none, because his piano playing here just isn't very interesting. The fact remains that -- even with these new tracks and the lavish presentation -- this is a muddled album, but like The Layla Sessions it's still a hell of a set for the dedicated, filled with unheard music, good liners, and beautiful packaging. Those who do love the album or the work of the musicians involved will not be disappointed by this, and may well find new moments of fascination in the best of the jams. [The two bonus tracks that appeared on the original late-'80s CD release of Blind Faith are not here, as it was subsequently discovered that they were Rick Grech demos that didn't involve the rest of the band.] ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine & Bruce Eder
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • Release Date: 1/9/2001
  • Label: Polygram Records
  • UPC: 731454952927
  • Catalog Number: 549529

Album Credits

Performance Credits
Blind Faith Primary Artist
Ginger Baker Percussion, Drums
Steve Winwood Organ, Bass, Guitar, Piano, Keyboards, Vocals
Rick Grech Bass, Violin, Vocals
Eric Clapton Guitar, Vocals
Technical Credits
Sam Myers Composer
Ginger Baker Composer, Contributor
Buddy Holly Composer
Steve Winwood Composer, Contributor
Rick Grech Contributor
Norman Petty Composer
Jimmy Miller Producer
Jerry Allison Composer
Chris Blackwell Contributor
George Chkiantz Engineer
Eric Clapton Composer, Contributor
Andy Johns Engineer
Bill Levenson Producer
Joe Mauldin Composer
Robert Stigwood Contributor
Vartan Art Direction
Bob Seidemann Cover Photo
Stanley Miller Cover Design, Cover Art
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 2 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(1)

4 Star

(1)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Blind Faith - A Must Have CD

    If you meet someone in their forties who has never heard this album, steer clear ... you've met someone who was clearly out of touch with their generation. This album, as much as any other defined a disaffected, restless generation. Yet the music remains as seductive today as when the album first appeared. My favorite cuts are ''Can't Find My Way Home'' and ''In the Presence of the Lord''. These songs reflect how the popular music of the 60's and 70's differed from the music of earlier periods. While both songs are melodic, the melodies transcend the lines between several musical disciplines, and the lyrics are a departure from sugar-coated tripe of earlier music. I could do without ''Do What You Like'', which features an extended drum solo by Ginger Baker. But extended cuts featuring ''jam'' efforts were typical of albums produced at the time, and this particular cut showcases Baker's previously underappreciated talents. I've owned three copies of this album, (buying a new one each time the old one began to show wear). My current copy is the UK version that was banned in the United States because the cover displayed a photo of a topless 13 year old. Apparently times have changed, as I notice that the once-forbidden cover now graces the soon-to-be-released CD version. But times have not changed so much as to relegate this music to the ''oldies'' bin. The music and the lyrics are timeless. It is best, I think, that this band produced only one album. As with the Beatles, fans of Blind Faith are forever left to wonder whether the group could have produced another album of this quality. It is that imponderable that makes this album so special. Moreover, Blind Faith's lone effort set the stage for the meteoric rise of Steve Winwood and Eric Clapton as solo performers, and made Ginger Baker and Rik Grech household names among audiophiles. I know it's expensive, but gems usually are. Buy it!!! You'll be glad you did!!!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Blind Faith: Remastered and Longer, But Better?

    Now often overlooked, Blind Faith was Eric Clapton's first move after Cream imploded at the end of 1968. Joining forces with the multi-talented Steve Winwood, who has just left Traffic seemed like an unbeatable idea, and the addition of drummer extraordinaire Ginger Baker and bassist Rick Grech made Blind Faith seem like a ''can't miss'' project. Six months later it was over. Rushed into the studio my greedy and insensitive managers and then sent on a long and chaotic tour, Blind Faith never had a chance to gel as a band. After one promising album, the group broke up. Judged a disappointment at the time Blind Faith's one and only album has some very fine moments. Clapton had yet to develop the confidence needed to be a convincing lead vocalist, so he deferred to Winwood, who was at his peak as a singer. Clapton's guitar work is simply magnificent, as he is already maturing beyond his work with Cream and pointing towards his renaissance with Derek & the Dominoes that began a year later. Polydor has remastered ''Blind Faith'' using state-of-the-art technology, and reissued it with outtakes and jam sessions from the original 1969 recording sessions. The original album is a revelation; the sound as crisp and full as is imaginable. The clarity is astounding, and even if you think you know every note of this album, you will be pleasantly surprised by what you hear on this new version. Songs like Winwood's ''Can't Find My Way Home'' and ''Sea of Joy,'' and Clapton's ''Presence of the Lord'' have aged very well and sound better than ever. The outtakes are a mixed lot. A couple have appeared on Clapton and Winwood's anthologies, and several others have circulated for years on bootlegs, albeit with inferior sound. These tracks are interesting but not essential. The jams, alas, are largely a waste. Playing riffs for ten or fifteen minutes while waiting for a musical idea that's worth keeping is not my idea of fun for the listener. These tracks are not even built around a reliable and basic format like 12-bar blues. There are some fiery moments - how could there not be with these musicians - but, like the three CD ''Layla'' box a decade ago, most of the unreleased material is disappointing. Still, fans of Clapton, Winwood and their various bands will probably want to own this set. The remastered ''Blind Faith'' is a gem, and stakes a viable claim for the album as one of the best of its era.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews