Bloggers Boot Camp: Learning How to Build, Write, and Run a Successful Blog

Bloggers Boot Camp: Learning How to Build, Write, and Run a Successful Blog

3.0 2
by Charlie White, John Biggs
     
 

ISBN-10: 0240819179

ISBN-13: 9780240819174

Pub. Date: 08/30/2011

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

Bloggers Boot Camp shows you how to build a great blog from the ground up. This isn't a book about technology -- it's a book about engaging millions of readers. Starting your blog is easy, but building and maintaining a popular one is hard. Blogging experts John Biggs and Charlie White (Gizmodo, Mashable and TechCrunch) share their secrets from the frontline

Overview

Bloggers Boot Camp shows you how to build a great blog from the ground up. This isn't a book about technology -- it's a book about engaging millions of readers. Starting your blog is easy, but building and maintaining a popular one is hard. Blogging experts John Biggs and Charlie White (Gizmodo, Mashable and TechCrunch) share their secrets from the frontline showing you how to blog with quality and flair, find the best stories, and attract millions of readers to your blog. Blogging goes way beyond writing. It's a conversation between you and your audience. Guiding you to blogging success Bloggers Boot Camp shows you how to:

* Uncover a niche for your blog, and realize key factors about yourself that you need to know before you write a single word.
• Gather the ideal tools for blogging, without spending too much or approaching it underequipped. *Discover the best ways to spread the word about your new blog.
• Find the most compelling stories to write about, and get the information before anyone else does.
• Transform your writing by learning the subtle art of constructing a compelling, engaging blog post.
• Stimulate your readers to directly participate in the two-way conversation, perhaps the most exciting part of this new way of communicating.

* Teaches writers how to blog and bloggers how to write
• Offers a simple method for writing every day and a simple formula for creating compelling content
• The writers have 20,000+ posts under their belts at three of the five most powerful blogs in the world.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780240819174
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
Publication date:
08/30/2011
Pages:
224
Product dimensions:
7.40(w) x 9.60(h) x 0.60(d)

Table of Contents

Intro The Niche Getting Started Essential Blogging Skills Hello, World Gathering News How to Write a Blog Post Mob Rule Building Traffic and Making Money Problems and How to Solve Them Tips and Tricks of the Trade

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Blogger's Boot Camp: Learning How to Build, Write and Run a Successful Blog 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
JustSomeYahoo More than 1 year ago
What a disappointment! I bought the book at a brick and mortar BN store at 40% off because it looked like a topic in which I am interested. 80% off would still be stretching the value. There are some good topics (Ethics Problems and How to Solve Them), but the writing style shows professionalism of an older journalistic style is bygone. The author(s) seem to consider themselves journalists and also capable of being writing instructors. Ha-ha. That's not to say they do not or cannot make money doing what they do. I can only imagine a drippy nosed, baggy pants with underwear showing, big-billed baseball style cap on sideways advisor with the latest half factual gossip and hype. The book wreaks of immaturity and addiction to faddishness. It bills itself as a How to Build, Write, and Manage a blog. There was not much good information on building. Uuhh. Get a good digital camera (p. 45). Uh, get a computer and an internet connection (p. 42). On writing (p. 52), they actually advise "But don't let what happened to you in English class affect you at all." Huh? Does that mean to not let an inability to express yourself clearly thwart jumping into the fray of written opinions? Well, that is just encouragement to flood the web world with more poor quality communication. These same bozos actually say, "We are real journalists breaking real news" (intro xv). I don't doubt at Gizmodo they get real news. But, "real journalists"? Gimme a break. (would someone give the guy with the runny nose a tissue?) These guys rightly say, "There's a difference between amatuer and amatuerish work." (p. 1). The guys are professionals who produce amatuerish work. An example is that there is little focus on a specific audience. Or, they imagine the whole world of people interested in blogging consist of techie geeks or hobbie enthusiasts. They also rightly note that the change in media supports short reads then go on to encourage 1,000 word a day babbles. Better to say nothing than to waste my time! I'll come back to visit if I know you really have something to say. You can see in the style that these guys do know how to BS their way to reach a certain number of words. There is a lot of repetition, non-instructional repetition. But if popular "filler" is what you want to produce, then maybe this book will work for you. I was also introduced to the word "snarky" -- repeatedly. So this opinion is meant to be "snarky" as they advise their readers to be.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I borrowed this book from the library and enjoyed reading it over dinner. It seems pretty complete, and written from the perspective of experienced journalists, which is helpful. As a former journalist, I like the authors' style and found myself laughing out loud more than once. It was helpful to see how they described the various free blogging platforms out there, including Google Blogger, Wordpress, Tumblr, LiveJournal, and others. The little intro to HTML was helpful, and the discussion of different kinds of blog posts was also helpful. I continue to be struck by the similarities between newspaper reporting and blogging, and this book helps to drive home that point. I also feel empowered to do more with short videos on future blog posts. I particularly like the tips for shooting video in the field, like shoot more than you think you will need, and be mindful of the background behind people in the shot. My major gripe with the book is the lack of a chapter on selling your blog. With lots of work and dedication, a blog can become a valuable online asset. Why not focus more on the process of cashing out? There is a lively and active market for used blogs at auction on the Internet. Why so little mention of this in a book on the basics? Any entrepreneur must have an exit strategy in mind when starting an enterprise. This would be a helpful improvement if the book goes into a second edition.