Blood and Oil: The Dangers and Consequences of America's Growing Petroleum Dependency

Overview

From the author of Resource Wars, a landmark assessment of the critical role of petroleum in America's actions abroad

In his pathbreaking Resource Wars, world security expert Michael T. Klare alerted us to the role of resources in conflicts in the post-Cold War world. Now, in Blood and Oil, he concentrates on a single precious commodity, petroleum, while issuing a warning to the United States-its most powerful, and most dependent, global ...

See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (56) from $1.99   
  • New (4) from $3.99   
  • Used (52) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$3.99
Seller since 2010

Feedback rating:

(133)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
Excellent condition. Interior is tight, bright and clean. Hard covers are tight and stiff. Complete with original paper dust cover. Minor scuffing on the paper dust cover from ... shelf wear. 100% Satisfaction Guaranteed. All items are carefully enclosed with bubble wrap. We ship promptly and worldwide via US Post and will email you a tracking number. Read more Show Less

Ships from: Emigrant, MT

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$17.00
Seller since 2005

Feedback rating:

(10)

Condition: New
2004 Hard cover Illustrated. New in new dust jacket. Hardcover & DJ//TIGHT & UNREAD/nice unopened copy/BRIGHT & CLEAN/in protective BRODART/(F5084)hc Sewn binding. Cloth over ... boards. 288 p. Contains: Illustrations. Audience: General/trade. Read more Show Less

Ships from: Rockville, MD

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$45.00
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(136)

Condition: New
Brand new.

Ships from: acton, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
$50.00
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(136)

Condition: New
Brand new.

Ships from: acton, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Overview

From the author of Resource Wars, a landmark assessment of the critical role of petroleum in America's actions abroad

In his pathbreaking Resource Wars, world security expert Michael T. Klare alerted us to the role of resources in conflicts in the post-Cold War world. Now, in Blood and Oil, he concentrates on a single precious commodity, petroleum, while issuing a warning to the United States-its most powerful, and most dependent, global consumer.
Since September 11th and the commencement of the "war on terror," the world's attention has been focused on the relationship between U.S. foreign policy in the Middle East and the oceans of crude oil that lie beneath the region's soil. Klare traces oil's impact on international affairs since World War II, revealing its influence on the Truman, Eisenhower, Nixon, and Carter doctrines. He shows how America's own wells are drying up as our demand increases; by 2010, the United States will need to import 60 percent of its oil. And since most of this supply will have to come from chronically unstable, often violently anti-American zones-the Persian Gulf, the Caspian Sea, Latin America, and Africa-our dependency is bound to lead to recurrent military involvement.
With clarity and urgency, Blood and Oil delineates the United States' predicament and cautions that it is time to change our energy policies, before we spend the next decades paying for oil with blood.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

“Compelling and insightful...U.S. dependence on oil is not something that can be dealt with ‘down the road,’ Klare posits. He offers thoughtful solutions that, while expensive, are essential to escape compromising the principles of American policy. This powerful book forecasts that if we do not change the paradigm, the flow of blood will continue unabated while a dwindling supply of oil will threaten powerful and weak nations alike."
--H.C. Stackpole, Lieutenant General, USMC (ret.)

Blood and Oil is the most comprehensive, up-to-date analysis of America's military-petroleum complex available today. From our gluttonous demand for fuel to power our automobiles to the activities of Centcom in the Persian Gulf, Michael Klare is invariably incisive and accurate. With a petroleum import dependency well over fifty percent, the United States is digging its own grave.”
--Chalmers Johnson, author of The Sorrows of Empire

“Oil, says Michael Klare, makes us strong, but dependency makes us weak. His clear, informed, and troubling diagnosis of America's greatest addiction comes as oil’s rising cost in blood and treasure requires us to understand the greater perils to come. Blood and Oil proves that oil's substitutes—and especially their efficient use—are an even greater bargain than they look. Too much time has already been wasted on denial. America's security, power, and freedom now turn on our choice.”
--Amory B. Lovins, Cofounder and CEO, Rocky Mountain Institute

“The rapid increase in the price of gasoline is a direct result of the failure of the U.S. to develop a realistic energy policy. As Michael Klare demonstrates in this provocative new book, we will continue to pay high prices and use military force unless we reduce our dependence on oil from the Middle East. A must read for Americans concerned about national security and economic growth.”
--Lawrence Korb, Senior Fellow at the Center for American Progress and former Assistant Secretary of Defense

Blood and Oil throws into sharp relief the political and social dimensions of the most important problem of our times. Reasoned and readable, it sketches out the terrible consequences of our nation's immense and growing addiction to petroleum. This is an important book.”
--David Goodstein, author of Out of Gas

“Donald Rumsfeld famously declared that the Iraq War ‘has nothing to do with oil, literally nothing to do with oil.’ Nonsense, demonstrates Michael Klare, in Blood and Oil, a compelling new assessment of America’s bet on Middle Eastern oil as the lifeblood of the U.S. economy. Klare’s mastery of the interplay of natural resources and conflict is unrivaled, and his new study is timely and vitally important.”
--Jeffrey D. Sachs, Director of the Earth Institute at Columbia University

Publishers Weekly
The world's rapidly growing economy is dependent on oil, the supply is running out and the U.S. and other great powers are engaged in an escalating game of brinkmanship to secure its continued free flow. Such is the premise of Klare's powerful and brilliant new book (following Resource Wars). The U.S.-with less than 5% of the world's total population-consumes about 25% of the world's total supply of oil, he argues. With no meaningful conservation being attempted, Klare sees the nation's energy behavior dominated by four key trends: "an increasing need for imported oil; a pronounced shift toward unstable and unfriendly suppliers in dangerous parts of the world; a greater risk of anti-American or civil violence; and increased competition for what will likely be a diminishing supply pool." In clear, lucid prose, Klare lays out a disheartening and damning indictment of U.S. foreign policy. From the waning days of WWII, when Franklin Roosevelt gave legitimacy to the autocratic Saudi royalty, to the current conflict in Iraq, Klare painstakingly describes a nation controlled by its unquenchable thirst for oil. Rather than setting out a strategy for energy independence, he finds a roadmap for further U.S. dependence on imported oil, more exposure for the U.S. military overseas and, as a result, less safety for Americans at home and abroad. While Klare offers some positive suggestions for solving the problem, in tone and detail this work sounds a dire warning about the future of the world. Illus. (Sept.) Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Library Journal
Since the United States will need to import 60 percent of its oil by 2010, most of it from now deeply anti-American countries, we had better start rethinking our energy politics. So argues the author of Blood and Oil. Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780805073133
  • Publisher: Holt, Henry & Company, Inc.
  • Publication date: 10/4/2004
  • Series: American Empire Project Series
  • Edition description: REV
  • Pages: 288
  • Product dimensions: 5.90 (w) x 10.10 (h) x 1.12 (d)

Meet the Author

Michael T. Klare is the author of fourteen books, including Resource Wars, Blood and Oil, Rising Powers, Shrinking Planet and The Race for What's Left. A regular contributor to Harper's, Foreign Affairs, and the Los Angeles Times, he is the defense analyst for The Nation and the director of the Five College Program in Peace and World Security Studies at Hampshire College in Amherst.

Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

From Blood and Oil:
o In 1998, for the first time, more than half of the
United States' oil supply came from foreign sources. Imports of foreign petroleum are projected to rise to 60% in 2010, 65% in 2020,
and 70% by 2030.
o America's oil fields are experiencing irreversible decline. Even if reserves in Alaska's wildlife refuge are extracted, they will reduce U.S.
imports of foreign oil by only about 2% per year for the next two decades-an almost negligible change.
o To pay for all of this imported oil, American businesses and consumers will have to cough up an estimated $3.5 trillion between 2000 and 2025-
if oil remains within a moderate price range.
o Even more importantly, since most of the world's remaining oil resources are located in deeply unstable regions-over 65% in the Persian Gulf alone-military involvement to ensure access is inevitable.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

1 The dependency dilemma : imported oil and national security 1
2 Lethal embrace : the American alliance with Saudi Arabia 26
3 Choosing dependency : the energy strategy of the Bush administration 56
4 Trapped in the gulf : the irresistible lure of bountiful petroleum 74
5 No safe havens : oil and conflict beyond the Persian Gulf 113
6 Geopolitics reborn : the U.S.-Russian-Chinese struggle in the Persian Gulf and Caspian Basin 146
7 Escaping the dilemma : a strategy for energy autonomy and integrity 180
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 3, 2005

    Useful study of oil politics

    Resources, not differences in civilisations or identities, are behind most conflicts. Most important is oil, which drives armed forces, economies and international politics. The US state treats oil as a matter of national security. Petroleum supplies 41% of its energy, two-thirds of it for transport (petrol fuels 97% of its transport). Since 1998, it has depended on foreign sources for over half its oil. But Europe, Russia, Japan and China also depend on foreign supplies, sharpening rivalry. The Middle East has two-thirds of the worldfs proven oil reserves: 25% in Saudi Arabia, 12.6% in Iran, 10.7% in Iraq, 9.3% in UAE, 9.3% in Kuwait and 1.5% in Qatar. All these countries' governments are now pro-US, except Iran. Russia and the Caspian Sea have 7.4%, the North Sea only 1.6%, Venezuela 7.4% and Nigeria 2.3%. There is also oil in Colombia, Mexico, Angola, Azerbaijan and Kazakhstan. A US government report of 1941 urged, gmore and more aggressive foreign policy aimed at assuring access to petroleum overseas.h Earlier its cloak for aggression was eanti-communismf, now it is eanti-terrorismf. The US state wants all the countries that it dominates to increase their oil exports to the USA. The capitalist road leads to more wars, permanent US occupation of the Middle East and rising terrorism. Before the attack on Iraq, Ahmed Chalabi, head of the Iraqi National Congress, promised, gAmerican companies will have a big share of Iraqi oil.h US forces seized Iraq's oil fields, refineries and Oil Ministry. The US state is covertly allied to the Mujehadin-e Khalq, an anti-Iranian militia based in northern Iraq. There is an alternative. Klare urges his country to end security agreements for US access to oil, particularly with the despots ruling Saudi Arabia and the Gulf States; to end all US military intervention in the Gulf, close all its bases in the Middle East and the Caspian region. This would save American lives, cut military spending and reduce the threat of terrorism. He also urges America to reduce its dependence on imported oil: make all vehicles more fuel-efficient, and rebuild rail systems.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 14, 2004

    Don't Waste Your Money.

    This book should come with a warning label: Blood and Oil is a waste of energy. Klare provides an edifying survey of the roots of US dependency on foreign petroleum. He covers the nature of the dilemma and our economic addiction to oil, and makes a convincing case for the need to change in the first two chapters. Just when I was primed for multiple chapters on how to escape this dilemma, he launches into a politically biased four-chapter page-filling tangent. Sadly it isn¿t until the last fourteen pages of the book that he gets to what I had hoped would be the meat of this book ¿ how to escape the dilemma of dependency. He begins by saying we need a ¿paradigm shift¿ ¿ well, DUH! And, then he offers a conflicted contradiction of trivial ideas that amount to: 1) Don¿t support repugnant dictatorships for oil, 2) Reducing our dependency on foreign oil ¿ again, DUH! ¿ using less SUVs and more hybrid/electric vehicles. And as a finale, 3) We must hasten our transition to a post-petroleum economy. This covers a whopping four; count `em, four pages and provides simplistic suggestions with few details of how to accomplish them. I got the book to discover this and it disappoints. It¿s insulting to spend hard-earned money to find out the book was an excuse to make a few bucks. Save your money. Walk over to the library and do your share to save the oil used to deliver it to your house.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 30, 2004

    Chilling Expose

    Michael T. Klare, author of 'Resource Wars', provides a chilling and sobering expose of America's addiction to oil and the military-petroleum complex which that addiction has spawned. 'Blood and Oil' shows how the American military will find itself committed on a permanent warfare footing in the Persian Gulf and Caspian Basin petro-rich regions in the years ahead as the U.S., Russia and China contend for supremacy over the control of the life-blood of the global economy. Klare suggests common sense technological alternatives which can help the U.S. achieve an energy future of 'autonomy and integrity,' but fails to confront the radical political transformation which must take place in America before the military-petroleum complex can be stopped in its tracks. Highly recommended nonetheless.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)