Blood Secret [NOOK Book]

Overview

The minute she had opened the trunk, she knew there wasn't anything like hope in it. Just awful musty things, but each one with a kind of terrible dark halo around it. She picked up that piece of old lace. She saw that stain -- pale, brownish in color. She knew it was blood. Somebody's blood. There was violence in that trunk, and dark secrets, and she did not want to know them.

Curious about the old homestead where she now lives, Jerry finds an ancient trunk in the basement that...

See more details below
Blood Secret

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK Study
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$5.99
BN.com price

Overview

The minute she had opened the trunk, she knew there wasn't anything like hope in it. Just awful musty things, but each one with a kind of terrible dark halo around it. She picked up that piece of old lace. She saw that stain -- pale, brownish in color. She knew it was blood. Somebody's blood. There was violence in that trunk, and dark secrets, and she did not want to know them.

Curious about the old homestead where she now lives, Jerry finds an ancient trunk in the basement that contains, among other things, an old piece of bloodstained lace, some letters, and a battered doll. The objects in the trunk have stories to tell -- stories about the Spanish Inquisition spanning nearly five hundred years and stories of secrets locked deep in the bloodlines of Jerry's ancestors.

Kathryn Lasky's powerhouse novel is a dramatic historical saga that brings the reader face-to-face with some of the worst atrocities ever committed against humankind in the name of God. But above all, it is an unforgettable coming-of-age story about a girl who, in connecting with her own past and faith, is at last able to face her own demons and liberate not only herself but also future generations of her family from the long chain of suffering and silence.

Fourteen-year-old Jerry Luna, mute since her mother's disappearance, is sent to her great-great aunt Constanza's house, where she discovers a trunk that draws her into the world of her ancestors during the Spanish Inquisition.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Like Signs and Wonders, the previous book in the popular series featuring Pastor Sam Gardner and the colorful parishioners of the Harmony Friends Meeting in Harmony, Ind., Gulley's fourth installment unfolds through a series of warm, lightly comic anecdotes. Readers will know they're in cozily familiar territory from the get-go, when Dale Hinshaw-the vigilant, long-winded, self-appointed guardian of doctrinal purity-seizes an opportunity to take the pulpit on Easter Sunday (Pastor Sam has laryngitis) and rant for 45 minutes without a single mention of the Resurrection. As the book strolls along, Sam presides over a funeral for a fellow who-oops!-isn't dead, experiences a couple of home-repair mishaps, gets validated for another year of preaching, contracts head lice and bemusedly recounts the antics of his fellow citizens. Tiffany Nagel, the "Sausage Queen," is unmasked as a vegetarian; the town's 29-year-old spinster, Deena Morrison, finally meets her Prince Charming thanks to ringworm; and Dale Hinshaw keeps causing trouble, even for his own wife. By the time December rolls around, Pastor Sam is fed up with every "narrow-minded kook" in town, and it's time for some soul-searching and a re-evaluation of his job as pastor-if those kooks don't get him fired first. This is sweet, homespun storytelling, as comfy and reassuring as warm socks in a wet spring. Gulley's growing number of fans will relish this funny and occasionally hokey novel. 8-city author tour. (Apr.) Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
Since her mother walked off and disappeared, Jerry has been shuttled around to various charities. It took authorities years to find a relative because Jerry refuses to speak a word to anyone. Now ready for high school, Jerry has been sent to live with her great-great-aunt Constanza. In Constanza's house, Jerry finds a trunk filled with mementos. Each memento Jerry touches fills her with memories from another time. Starting with Miriam, a Jewish girl living in Seville, Spain in 1391, Jerry learns first-hand the horrors Jews suffered at the hands of the Spanish Inquisition in Spain and America from the fourteenth to the sixteenth centuries. Jerry becomes aware that certain practices Constanza follows, such as lighting candles on Friday nights and not mixing red meat and milk, come from the Jewish religion. With each item she finds in the trunk, Jerry learns the bitter truth behind her family's apparently staunch Catholic roots. Throughout the book, Jerry finds the courage to began speaking again and starts to lead herself and her aunt back to their Jewish heritage. Jerry's self-imposed muteness echoes the stifling of her ancestors' religion throughout time. Lasky has created a masterful work that combines historical fiction with modern problems. Along with Jerry, the reader discovers a history that is rarely studied and even rarely used in fiction. A family tree helps the reader follow the family through the generations. 2004, HarperCollins, Ages 10 up.
—Amie Rose Rotruck
VOYA
Jerry first swallowed her words when she was five; it became easier and easier until she actually forgot the sound of her own voice. Abandoned by her mother, at fourteen she leaves the Catholic Charities Home to live with Great-Aunt Constanza, a baker of Southwestern breads in New Mexico. Searching the root cellar for an old sewing machine, Jerry finds an ancient domed trunk, and when she delves into its secrets, she finds odd bits and pieces, a puzzle of time and space. As she holds a piece of lace, stained and yellowed with age, time begins to bend, transporting her to Seville, Spain, in the house of the lace maker in June 1391. As she watches, the first of the Jewish persecutions begins to unfold. Other mementos transport Jerry to 1480 and the burnings instigated by Torquemado, the flights from Spain to Portugal, to the Yucatan, and to New Mexico. Threads of superstition and habit link the generations. Constanza performs many little rituals-a special dinner on Friday, no milk with meat-that she attributes to superstition. As Jerry journeys to the past to uncover the family's Jewish roots that gave rise to the actions, she begins to find her voice and herself. Much has been written about the Russian pogroms and the Holocaust, but other than Out of Many Waters by Jacqueline Greene (Walker, 1988), there is little for young adults about the earlier persecutions of the Sephardic Jews. Lasky crafts a beautiful story, carrying the history of one family through the centuries and weaving threads from generation to generation, snaring the reader as surely as the spiders of New Mexico trap their prey. VOYA CODES: 5Q 4P M J (Hard to imagine it being any better written; Broad general YA appeal;Middle School, defined as grades 6 to 8; Junior High, defined as grades 7 to 9). 2004, HarperCollins, 256p., and PLB Ages 11 to 15.
—Roxy Ekstrom <%ISBN%>006000066X
KLIATT
To quote the review of the hardcover in KLIATT, July 2004: This is a fascinating story told somewhat awkwardly--not because of the language, but because of the mechanism that drives the plot. A modern-day girl in New Mexico discovers the truth about her heritage through objects discovered in her elderly aunt's basement. Her ancestors come to life for her in some mystical way, and in her visions of their lives, Jerry looks back in time to the persecutions of Jews during the time of the Spanish Inquisition. She sees her ancestors convert to Catholicism to save their families; sees them seeking refuge with the Moors in Grenada, Spain; sees them journey to the New World, trying to survive. Jerry's ancient aunt Constanza (in her 90s) is a successful baker whose traditions are somewhat mysterious, including the lighting of candles each Friday evening. Jerry asks her why she does this and Constanza doesn't know...only that her mother taught her to do it. Jerry realizes this is a link to the family's Jewish heritage--this is the blood secret of the title. Constanza is one of the truly wonderful characters in YA fiction, especially as a mentor to Jerry, a troubled young teenager who is literally mute because of the complicated losses in her life. Constanza and the family history give Jerry a sense of herself and fulfill her need to belong somewhere, to someone. Lasky offers an explanation of her way of telling this story by referring to the Navaho way of believing in windows to other worlds, of seeing people in the shadows. KLIATT Codes: JS--Recommended for junior and senior high school students. 2004, HarperCollins, 293p. bibliog., $5.99.. Ages 12 to 18.
—Claire Rosser
Library Journal
In Gulley's fifth "Harmony" novel, Quaker pastor Sam Gardner (e.g., Home to Harmony; Just Shy of Harmony) has plenty to deal with in his little Midwestern township, including church elder Dale Hinshaw's constant interference in church matters, mutiny in the Sunday School class, a Sausage Queen who is dethroned when it is discovered that she is a vegetarian, and parishioners who just don't seem to understand Sam's spiritual leadership. Caught between old timers who resist all modern thinking and progressives like the feisty Deena and Mabel Morrison, Pastor Sam tries to be the voice of reason and keep his congregation from killing one another. When a small group of church members plot to replace him, Sam becomes more determined than ever to keep his flock together. Gulley's delightful series is reminiscent of Garrison Keillor's Lake Wobegon Days and will, once again, delight his fans. It will also appeal to all readers who enjoy the charms and perils of small-town life. Recommended for popular fiction collections as well as all libraries that own the "Harmony" series. Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
School Library Journal
Gr 7 Up-Since her mother disappeared from a campground several years before, 14-year-old Jerry has lived in various Catholic Charities homes. The trauma of her experiences has left her with selective mutism. Although she wants to speak, she just can't get the words that form in her throat to come out. Now, she is going to live in New Mexico with her great-great-aunt, Constanza de Luna. After settling in and beginning school, Jerry discovers an old trunk in her aunt's basement. The mysterious objects within it seem to call to her, and each time she handles one of them, she is catapulted into her family's past. Brief vignettes describe the experiences of several of her ancestors, beginning with Miriam, a Jewish girl living in Seville in 1391 who witnesses the murder of her people and is baptized by force. Jerry, who has been raised Catholic, comes to realize that her ancestors were Jews, and she is upset by their heart-wrenching tales of religious persecution. Meanwhile, through her aunt's gentle manner and the understanding and acceptance of a new friend, the protagonist gradually becomes more and more socially engaged and begins to speak again. The story of Jerry's ancestors is skillfully interwoven with that of her present life. With each glimpse into her past, she is drawn more into her own family circle with her aunt. A well-told and satisfying story.-Sharon Morrison, Southeastern Oklahoma State University, Durant, OK Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Mysteries of her family and its long history fill the nooks and crannies of a teenager's mind in Albuquerque. Jerry is silent, as she has been since her mother disappeared, and she is finally delivered to a great-great aunt named Constanza who, although over 90, still bakes and delivers bread. In a family trunk, Jerry finds scraps of ancestors: a bit of lace, a silver medal, a text. While she's in Constanza's adobe cellar, she hears the shadows of distant ancestors, first in Spain, then in Mexico, that explain the meaning of each memento. What she learns, in the voices of those forebears, even as she haltingly relearns the use of her own voice, is that she is descended from Spanish Jews who were burned or forcibly converted, and that Constanza still cherishes and practices the lighting of Sabbath candles and other rituals whose meaning she never knew. Lasky tries to weave this into a tale of Catholic, Jewish, Aztec, and Navajo strands, where Jerry learns her full name and all of its meaning. Though it often reads like a lesson in this aspect of Jewish history, rather than a true historical time-travel, there will be readers eager to delve into the secrets of blood and shadows. (Fiction. YA)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780061962813
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 8/11/2009
  • Sold by: HARPERCOLLINS
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 304
  • Sales rank: 481,683
  • Age range: 13 years
  • File size: 808 KB

Meet the Author

Kathryn Lasky is the nationally bestselling author of many books for children and adults, including the Newbery Honor Book Sugaring Time; Elizabeth I and other popular books in the Royal Diaries series; and the bestselling epic fantasy series Guardians of Ga'hoole, which became a major motion picture. In Guardians of Ga'hoole, Lasky explores the behavior of owls. Now she uses her extensive research on hawks and the sport of falconry to again render a world that seamlessly blends natural history with fantasy.

The author and her husband, Christopher Knight, live in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and summer on an island off the coast of Maine. There she enjoys watching peregrine falcons soar on the thermal drafts above the cove where she swims.

Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

Life Goes on


By Philip Gulley

Walker Large Print

Copyright © 2005 Philip Gulley
All right reserved.

ISBN: 1594150702

Chapter One

Easter

My earliest memory of Easter was when I was five years old and looking for Easter eggs in my grandparents' backyard. I'm not sure if what I'm remembering is the event itself or the photograph of it my father took -- my brother, Roger, and me, dressed in our Sunday suits, pausing just long enough from our egg gathering to record the moment for posterity.

My grandmother kept the picture on the top of her bureau, a black-and-white photo with scalloped edges. In the background was my grandfather's shed, where he had a cot for naps on summer afternoons amidst the pleasant aroma of gasoline, turpentine, and sawdust.

I would visit them on Saturday afternoons and sit in the backyard swing with my grandma while Grandpa push-mowed the yard in neat stripes, the blades snicking against the roller. Every now and then he'd happen upon a long-forgotten Easter egg. A rainbow of egg shell would arc up from the mower while a pungent, sulfuric odor filled the air, the delayed resurrection of a half-buried Easter egg.

Alice Stout was my Sunday school teacher when I was growing up at Harmony Friends Meeting. When she would ask me why we celebrated Easter, I knew I was supposed to say something about Jesus rising from the tomb. But that struck me as a fanciful yarn the adults concocted to liven up the religion. For me, Easter was about sitting at the kitchen table with my mother and brother the night before, dipping eggs in teacups of dye, then laying them out to dry on that week's copy of the Harmony Herald.

Now Alice Stout is in the nursing home at Cartersburg, four eggs short of a dozen. When I went to visit her the week before Easter and read to her from the Scriptures about the Resurrection, she cackled like a madwoman. "Bullfeathers," she said. It is troublesome to struggle all your life believing something, only to have your Sunday school teacher dismiss it as bullfeathers, even if she is out of her gourd.

One of the ironies of life is that we often return gladly to what we once fled. I returned to my hometown and became the pastor of my childhood church. Now it's my job to rally the troops and urge them to believe things they might otherwise doubt, at least according to Dale Hinshaw, our self-appointed guardian of doctrinal purity, who's been vigilant about keeping me orthodox, lest I stray into the wilds of rationalism.

On my fourth Easter as pastor, I suggested we hold special services during Holy Week. I'm not sure now what possessed me to do that, probably my naive habit of thinking the church is always one program away from vitality. I envisioned a little Scripture reading, some singing, then a spirited theological discussion on certain aspects of the Resurrection.

When I presented my idea to the elders, they waded in with their concerns. Asa Peacock wanted to know if we could have cookies. Dale Hinshaw made me promise we'd read from the King James Version of the Bible. Harvey Muldock suggested holding a raffle each night to draw more people, and Fern Hampton declared, rather emphatically, that if the kitchen were used, the Friendly Women's Circle was not going to be stuck cleaning it.

Even though I grew up in this church and am accustomed to its eccentricities, I continue to marvel at how the simplest idea can soon rival the complexity of a Middle East peace treaty. What began as a modest suggestion to read the Bible, pray, and reflect on the meaning of Easter soon involved three committees, a church-wide vote on cookie preference, and an agreement to collect a special offering for the Friendly Women's Circle Cabinet Fund.

Fern Hampton was placed in charge of the cookie vote. Miriam Hodge suggested she might not want to make a big deal about it, just take an informal poll among the ladies of the church.

"What about the men?" Harvey Muldock asked."How come we don't get any say?"

"I'm sorry, Harvey," Miriam said. "I didn't mean to exclude you. What kind of cookies would you like?"

"I thought it was my job to ask people what kind of cookies they wanted," Fern complained.

"By all means," Miriam said." I just thought I'd help."

Fern turned to Harvey. "What kind of cookies would you like, Harvey?"

Harvey thought for a moment. "How about those little chocolate cookies with oatmeal that you mix up and put in the refrigerator?"

"One vote for chocolate drop cookies," Fern said, rooting through her purse for paper and a pencil. "Dale, what kind of cookies would you like?"

"Fern, perhaps we could do this a bit later," Miriam suggested. "I'm sure Sam has more pressing business for us to discuss just now."

"Don't I get to say what kind of cookies I like?" Dale asked.

"You go right ahead, Dale," Fern said. "I'm sure Sam won't mind."

"Well, I was over in Cartersburg last week at the Bible bookstore and they had these Scripture cookies. Kind of like fortune cookies, except they got the Word in 'em instead. I think we oughta get us some of them."

I used to believe the world would be saved by church committees, though sixteen years of ministry have cured me of such optimism. Now I prize those rare and selfless saints, those unwavering levers, who move the world while the committees are deciding on carpet colors.

After Fern's cookie survey, we moved on to the pressing matter of the special collection for the kitchen cabinets.

"Sam, what are your thoughts on the ushering?" Dale asked. "You want a box at the back of the meetinghouse for folks to put their donations in, or were you wantin' the guys to pass the baskets?"

"Well, if you ask me," Fern interrupted, "I think we should pass the baskets. That way people can't sneak out the side door without giving."

The elders sat quietly, pondering this vital concern ...

Continues...

Continues...

Excerpted from Life Goes on by Philip Gulley Copyright © 2005 by Philip Gulley. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Read More Show Less

First Chapter

Life Goes On
A Harmony Novel

Chapter One

Easter

My earliest memory of Easter was when I was five years old and looking for Easter eggs in my grandparents' backyard. I'm not sure if what I'm remembering is the event itself or the photograph of it my father took -- my brother, Roger, and me, dressed in our Sunday suits, pausing just long enough from our egg gathering to record the moment for posterity.

My grandmother kept the picture on the top of her bureau, a black-and-white photo with scalloped edges. In the background was my grandfather's shed, where he had a cot for naps on summer afternoons amidst the pleasant aroma of gasoline, turpentine, and sawdust.

I would visit them on Saturday afternoons and sit in the backyard swing with my grandma while Grandpa push-mowed the yard in neat stripes, the blades snicking against the roller. Every now and then he'd happen upon a long-forgotten Easter egg. A rainbow of egg shell would arc up from the mower while a pungent, sulfuric odor filled the air, the delayed resurrection of a half-buried Easter egg.

Alice Stout was my Sunday school teacher when I was growing up at Harmony Friends Meeting. When she would ask me why we celebrated Easter, I knew I was supposed to say something about Jesus rising from the tomb. But that struck me as a fanciful yarn the adults concocted to liven up the religion. For me, Easter was about sitting at the kitchen table with my mother and brother the night before, dipping eggs in teacups of dye, then laying them out to dry on that week's copy of the Harmony Herald.

Now Alice Stout is in the nursing home at Cartersburg, four eggs short of a dozen. When I went to visit her the week before Easter and read to her from the Scriptures about the Resurrection, she cackled like a madwoman. "Bullfeathers," she said. It is troublesome to struggle all your life believing something, only to have your Sunday school teacher dismiss it as bullfeathers, even if she is out of her gourd.

One of the ironies of life is that we often return gladly to what we once fled. I returned to my hometown and became the pastor of my childhood church.Now it's my job to rally the troops and urge them to believe things they might otherwise doubt, at least according to Dale Hinshaw, our self-appointed guardian of doctrinal purity, who's been vigilant about keeping me orthodox, lest I stray into the wilds of rationalism.

On my fourth Easter as pastor, I suggested we hold special services during Holy Week. I'm not sure now what possessed me to do that, probably my naive habit of thinking the church is always one program away from vitality. I envisioned a little Scripture reading, some singing, then a spirited theological discussion on certain aspects of the Resurrection.

When I presented my idea to the elders, they waded in with their concerns. Asa Peacock wanted to know if we could have cookies. Dale Hinshaw made me promise we'd read from the King James Version of the Bible. Harvey Muldock suggested holding a raffle each night to draw more people, and Fern Hampton declared, rather emphatically, that if the kitchen were used, the Friendly Women's Circle was not going to be stuck cleaning it.

Even though I grew up in this church and am accustomed to its eccentricities, I continue to marvel at how the simplest idea can soon rival the complexity of a Middle East peace treaty. What began as a modest suggestion to read the Bible, pray, and reflect on the meaning of Easter soon involved three committees, a church-wide vote on cookie preference, and an agreement to collect a special offering for the Friendly Women's Circle Cabinet Fund.

Fern Hampton was placed in charge of the cookie vote. Miriam Hodge suggested she might not want to make a big deal about it, just take an informal poll among the ladies of the church.

"What about the men?" Harvey Muldock asked."How come we don't get any say?"

"I'm sorry, Harvey," Miriam said. "I didn't mean to exclude you. What kind of cookies would you like?"

"I thought it was my job to ask people what kind of cookies they wanted," Fern complained.

"By all means," Miriam said." I just thought I'd help."

Fern turned to Harvey. "What kind of cookies would you like, Harvey?"

Harvey thought for a moment. "How about those little chocolate cookies with oatmeal that you mix up and put in the refrigerator?"

"One vote for chocolate drop cookies," Fern said, rooting through her purse for paper and a pencil. "Dale, what kind of cookies would you like?"

"Fern, perhaps we could do this a bit later," Miriam suggested. "I'm sure Sam has more pressing business for us to discuss just now."

"Don't I get to say what kind of cookies I like?" Dale asked.

"You go right ahead, Dale," Fern said. "I'm sure Sam won't mind."

"Well, I was over in Cartersburg last week at the Bible bookstore and they had these Scripture cookies. Kind of like fortune cookies, except they got the Word in 'em instead. I think we oughta get us some of them."

I used to believe the world would be saved by church committees, though sixteen years of ministry have cured me of such optimism. Now I prize those rare and selfless saints, those unwavering levers, who move the world while the committees are deciding on carpet colors.

After Fern's cookie survey, we moved on to the pressing matter of the special collection for the kitchen cabinets.

"Sam, what are your thoughts on the ushering?" Dale asked. "You want a box at the back of the meetinghouse for folks to put their donations in, or were you wantin' the guys to pass the baskets?"

"Well, if you ask me," Fern interrupted, "I think we should pass the baskets. That way people can't sneak out the side door without giving."

The elders sat quietly, pondering this vital concern ...

Life Goes On
A Harmony Novel
. Copyright © by Philip Gulley. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 4 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(3)

4 Star

(1)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Posted February 25, 2014

    I absolutely adore this book! Lasky creates a strong connection

    I absolutely adore this book! Lasky creates a strong connection between the 1500s and modern day New Mexico through the shared experience of emotional turmoil. &quot;Blood Secret&quot; is the fascinating tale of a girl who overcomes the emotional scars left by her mother's sudden disappearance, and at the same time it's an enrapturing account of the Spanish Inquisition. Lasky shows us that all humans, no matter their religion, age, country, or time period, are the same in our core.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 22, 2004

    this was pretty good

    this book was pretty good...it could have been more intresting...like the persons blood was in the first like 75 pages....she could have made it more intresting and persuasive if she made it more dramatic. but over all it was a pretty good book!!! I recomend this book to all ages.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 13, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 11, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)