Bloodhounds (Peter Diamond Series #4)

Bloodhounds (Peter Diamond Series #4)

5.0 1
by Peter Lovesey
     
 

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A rare stamp and a corpse are discovered in Bath within hours of each other. As he investigates, Inspector Peter Diamond discovers that both the person who found the stamp and the victim belong to the Bloodhounds, an elite group of mystery lovers, who now urge Diamond to bring the murderer to justice. But there’s a hitch: the body lies inside a padlocked

Overview

A rare stamp and a corpse are discovered in Bath within hours of each other. As he investigates, Inspector Peter Diamond discovers that both the person who found the stamp and the victim belong to the Bloodhounds, an elite group of mystery lovers, who now urge Diamond to bring the murderer to justice. But there’s a hitch: the body lies inside a padlocked houseboat and the only key is in the pocket of a man with an airtight alibi.


From the Trade Paperback edition.

Editorial Reviews

Marilyn Stasio
A real brain-banger....This pyrotechnic teaser had my head spinning. -- New York Times Book Review
Mystery News
[A] fast-moving, full-bodied, engrossing tale...Diamond is a great invention.
Publishers Weekly - Cahners\\Publishers_Weekly
The Last Detective (1992) inaugurated this series with a bang. It was followed by Diamond Solitaire (1993) and 1995's Edgar-nominated The Summons. With this fourth installment, veteran English author Lovesey gives us his laconic Bath policeman Peter Diamond in full dazzle. The Bloodhounds are a diverse group of mystery fans who meet in a dark crypt and talk. One night before the subject of locked-room puzzles is brought up, Milo, one of the group, opens a prized book and finds the rare Penny Black stamp recently stolen from a nearby museum. Milo is suitably puzzled. A little later, Milo is found dead in his tightly locked riverboat. The coppers have two perplexing puzzles to solve, and Diamond's sharp temper is soon sorely tested by the thief/killer, who sends the police and the media cute riddles. Diamond comes up with a perfectly workable scenario for what happened, which readers are given just enough time to swallow before Lovesey reveals the real thief and killer. With this especially effective conclusion, Lovesey demonstrates that his embrace of crime fiction reaches from John Dickson Carr to Andrew Vachss as he skillfully pays homage to the old style whodunit in this thoroughly modern mystery.
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
The Last Detective (1992) inaugurated this series with a bang. It was followed by Diamond Solitaire (1993) and 1995's Edgar-nominated The Summons. With this fourth installment, veteran English author Lovesey gives us his laconic Bath policeman Peter Diamond in full dazzle. The Bloodhounds are a diverse group of mystery fans who meet in a dark crypt and talk. One night before the subject of locked-room puzzles is brought up, Milo, one of the group, opens a prized book and finds the rare Penny Black stamp recently stolen from a nearby museum. Milo is suitably puzzled. A little later, Milo is found dead in his tightly locked riverboat. The coppers have two perplexing puzzles to solve, and Diamond's sharp temper is soon sorely tested by the thief/killer, who sends the police and the media cute riddles. Diamond comes up with a perfectly workable scenario for what happened, which readers are given just enough time to swallow before Lovesey reveals the real thief and killer. With this especially effective conclusion, Lovesey demonstrates that his embrace of crime fiction reaches from John Dickson Carr to Andrew Vachss as he skillfully pays homage to the old style whodunit in this thoroughly modern mystery. (Dec.)
Kirkus Reviews
The fourth of Lovesey's contemporary Peter Diamond procedurals (The Summons, 1995, etc.)—a series that has added substantially to his collection of awards—is cast in the form of a homage to mystery fans. In bustling Bath, a small band of eccentrics gather in a church crypt to argue the virtues of the various genres of crime fiction. As Golden Age devotees face off with noir adherents, local Detective Superintendent Diamond and his colleagues begin receiving rhymed notes threatening theft. And, indeed, a priceless stamp is taken from the Postal Museum; just as the mystery aficionados are considering varying their program to discuss the case, the stamp appears in one of the participants John Dickson Carr paperback! Sooner than you can say "locked room," the body of another participant is found in a locked—um—boat. The formal interviews of the Bath police impinge piquantly on the private gossip and even more private weaknesses—adultery, drunkenness, poor taste—of this group of colorfully drawn obsessives. Lovesey, always something of a Golden Age writer out of his time, provides some ingenious variations on the old "locked room" mystery formula while gleefully lecturing the reader on genre lore.

Still, the author violates the prewar code among mystery writers that protected the reader, handling some of his more sympathetic characters with absent-minded brutality. Adequate Lovesey, then, but hardly destined to be a favorite.

From the Publisher
Praise for Bloodhounds

“Peter Lovesey tosses off a real brain-banger in Bloodhounds, the fourth book in a challenging series . . . I am mad for these pyrotechnic teasers, and this one had my head spinning.”
The New York Times Book Review

“No one has done this kind of thing better since Dorothy L Sayers. A must for crime buffs, especially if they like John Dickson Carr.”
Mail on Sunday
 
“A perfect blend of psychology and technique.”
Boston Review 

“Lovesey gives us his laconic Bath policeman Peter Diamond in full dazzle . . . With this especially effective conclusion, Lovesey demonstrates that his embrace of crime fiction reaches from John Dickson Carr to Andrew Vachss as he skillfully pays homage to the old style whodunit in this thoroughly modern mystery.”
Publishers Weekly, Starred Review

“Lovesey, always something of a Golden Age writer out of his time, provides some ingenious variations on the old ‘locked room’ mystery formula, while gleefully lecturing the reader on genre lore.”
Kirkus Reviews

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781569477953
Publisher:
Soho Press, Incorporated
Publication date:
12/01/2004
Series:
Peter Diamond Series , #4
Sold by:
Penguin Random House Publisher Services
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
360
Sales rank:
27,880
File size:
2 MB

Meet the Author

Peter Lovesey is the author of more than thirty highly praised mystery novels. He has been awarded the CWA Gold and Silver Daggers, the Cartier Diamond Dagger for Lifetime Achievement, the Strand Magazine Award for Lifetime Achievement, the Macavity, Barry, and Anthony Awards, and many other honors. He lives in West Sussex, England.


From the Trade Paperback edition.

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Bloodhounds (Peter Diamond Series #4) 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
harstan More than 1 year ago
The Bloodhounds are a weird mystery fan group who meet in strange places like crypts to hold discussions. Just prior to tonight¿s meeting Milo finds a rare Penny Black stamp inside a John Dickson Carr novel; the stamp was recently stolen from the Postal Museum. Not long afterward, Milo is found dead in his locked riverboat and the stamp is missing....................... The killer sends riddles to the police and the media driving an already irate Bath Detective Superintendent Diamond up a wall while his staff interviews the other members of the Bloodhounds. Diamond soon comes up with a theory on how the killer escaped the locked riverboat puzzle, but that fails to get him any closer to identifying the culprit making him wonder if his hypothesis is sending him down the wrong path......................... Paying homage to John Dickson Carr, no one writing today does locked room mysteries as good as Peter Lovesey does. In his fourth Diamond police procedural (see THE LAST DETECTIVE, DIAMOND SOLITAIRE, and THE SUMMONS) is a terrific tale that grips readers as the cops question the obsessed Bloodhounds only to uncover all sorts of personal secrets, but no murder motive as none seems like a thief. Diamond remains cantankerous perhaps more so this time because the serial killer is laughing in public at his foibles. Besides the locked room, Mr. Lovesey pulls a brilliant sleight of the hand that will fool and satiate the audience............................... Harriet Klausner