Bloodmoney

Bloodmoney

3.7 35
by David Ignatius
     
 

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“You emerge from its pages as if from a top-level security briefing—confident that you have been let in on the deepest secrets.”—Washington Post

Someone in Pakistan is killing the members of a new CIA unit trying to buy peace with America’s enemies. It falls to Sophie Marx, a young officer with a big chip on her shoulder,

Overview

“You emerge from its pages as if from a top-level security briefing—confident that you have been let in on the deepest secrets.”—Washington Post

Someone in Pakistan is killing the members of a new CIA unit trying to buy peace with America’s enemies. It falls to Sophie Marx, a young officer with a big chip on her shoulder, to figure out who’s doing the killing and why. Unfortunately for Sophie, nothing is quite what it seems. This is a theater of violence and revenge, in which the last act is one that Sophie could not have imagined.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Foreign intrigue specialist Ignatius (The Increment) continues his fictional trek through terrorist hot spots with this timely thriller about the CIA's bungling attempts to influence Pakistan's shaky, insecure leadership. Sophie Marx, an agent hungry to return to the field after a high-level but boring desk job, works for a new intelligence unit disguised as a Los Angeles record company, Hit Parade, whose undercover focus is to control Pakistani organized terrorist cells through bribery. It's not working. Not only are the terrorist attacks continuing but CIA agents delivering the bribes are being murdered. To make matters worse, Hit Parade's secret funding source—a highly illegal strategy to skim money from the world's financial markets—is rapidly becoming public knowledge. Ignatius, a Washington Post columnist, is especially good at capturing the work environment at the CIA, where petty bickering, one-upmanship, and moral lapses often get in the way of sound policy. (June)
Booklist
“In addition to being a solid page-turner, [Bloodmoney] offers intriguing characters, a complicated but skillfully explicated plot and a nuanced view of Pashtun tribal culture often at odds with the larger Punjabi population. And as with all of Ignatius’ fiction, readers attuned to current events may wonder if he knows things most Americans don’t.”
Library Journal
Action junkie Sophie Marx works for a secret CIA unit formed after 9/11 to avoid the sclerotic Langley headquarters. Suddenly, four agents are assassinated, and her job is to find and plug the leaks. She goes deep into suspicious territory to discern the facts from the careful camouflage. To her horror, she learns that her own side is rotten with deceit as her boss is using the powerful instruments of modern finance in London to fund the alternative unit. Unbeknownst to anyone, a Pakistani professor bent on revenge for the drone-caused deaths of his family had penetrated the electronic defenses and killed the vulnerable agents. VERDICT Ignatius leverages a colorful cast of fresh characters and the mystique of the Internet to weave a compulsively readable story about the profound hostilities in Pakistan and Afghanistan. The author's eighth novel (The Increment; Body of Lies) is essential for all active readers of spy thrillers and suspense and will leave them happily hungry for the ninth one. [See Prepub Alert, 12/6/10.]—Barbara Conaty, Falls Church, VA
Kirkus Reviews

Ignatius (The Increment, 2009, etc.) continues his series of top-notch CIA thrillers with this fast-paced new entry.

CIA field agent Sophie Marx recently returned from an overseas assignment where she narrowly escaped being killed. Now Sophie's working in a special off-the-books project run by the dangerous but capable Jeff Gertz. Gertz alone knows the full story behind the Hit Parade, a separate, untraceable operation of the CIA that is hidden in Los Angeles behind the façade of an entertainment company. From this seemingly innocuous office, Gertz runs operatives all over the world whose jobs, it appears, are to bring assets into the fold. But then something goes wrong, and those operatives start dying. One by one, the Hit Parade is losing some of its best agents to an unknown threat and Gertz, who never lets anyone see him sweat, decides that Sophie, his newly named chief of counterintelligence, is exactly the right person to keep his boss at the CIA and the White House off his back. When Sophie heads out to investigate, she finds much more than she anticipated. A longtime contributor to theWashington Post, where he has covered both the CIA and the Middle East, Ignatius writes with authority and skill about a shadow world in which nothing is as it seems and money is power.This may be fiction, but in the end the reader will be struck by how feasible the story really is.

A terrific, believable novel about the intersection of politics, ethics and finance.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780393082135
Publisher:
Norton, W. W. & Company, Inc.
Publication date:
06/11/2012
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
384
Sales rank:
260,536
File size:
838 KB

Meet the Author

David Ignatius, best-selling author and prize-winning columnist for the Washington Post, has been covering the Middle East and the CIA for more than twenty-five years. He lives in Washington, DC.

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Bloodmoney 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 35 reviews.
GuruNathan More than 1 year ago
I am a huge fan of David Ignatius novels and this is one of them. I just love the way he mixes fiction with reality. I just could not keep the book down. Especially if you are following international politics on the war on Terror this book is a must read!! This is one step better than Body of Lies. I can already see someone making a movie out of this novel. I hope his next novel comes soon!!
catwak More than 1 year ago
Am I uniquely freaked out by the fact that this book was published BEFORE Pakistan arrested its own citizens for allegedly assisting the U.S. in capturing Osama bin Laden? David Ignatius' spy novels are so real that I wouldn't be surprised to wake up one morning to an NPR report that he's been taken hostage by some government (maybe even ours) for coming too close to the truth. For me, reading his books is one of life's guilty pleasures, even though I always finish them with renewed gratitude for my safe but relatively dull life. I also hate to admit that I preferred the ending of this one to the more realistic scenario he's used before, where everyone ends up dead.
grumpydan More than 1 year ago
Somebody is killing the most secretly placed agents in other countries, but how are they being found out? This is what Sophie Marx, a CIA operative must find out. As the title state, is it all about money? The author takes current political climate and wraps them into a thriller that is disturbing (and I don't mean bad, but one that makes you think). It's a political power play for the characters that control the operatives, but the money involved.
Avid_ReaderMJ More than 1 year ago
Ignatius nailed it for this book, his other books, are chalk full of authentic classic espionage activity. This book, set in Pakistan, is an outstanding mix of intelligence community reform, mixed with financial and political intrigue. Ignatius is very successful in weaving the challenge of global terrorism into a story of tribal duty/responsibilities. Thank you David for another fantastic read. Hopefully more of your work will be shared with the masses through other mediums like Body of Lies.
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I highly recommend this book. Great story, great characterd - you won't want to put it down.
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Tigerpaw70 More than 1 year ago
A Novel of Espionage This spy novel is one of the best Mr. Ignatius has written so far. What makes this author stand out is we never know where the plotting will lead us. Deception is the theme of this captivating thriller, it is based on actual CIA operations and only someone with experience in the field can guess where fact crosses into fiction. The central character is Sophie Marx who works at the ''Hit parade LLP' office in a Los Angeles, it is a secret branch within the CIA that works under the radar and deploys agents around the world. The story starts when Howard Egan whose cover is a hedge fund manager for Alphabet Capital in London goes missing on a mission in Pakistan. Alarm bells are triggered when other operatives also deep under cover are eliminated one by one. Sophie Marx must find out who is killing them and how their lock-tight identities were compromised. The action and excitement begins when we are plunged into a game of deception and double-talk where each side has their own agenda while maintaining an artificial relationship with each other. The characterization, the dialogue and the interaction between the players skillfully displays the cultural differences and helps hype the suspense to another level. The pacing is brisk, the writing is clean and efficient and the plot is believable and free of melodrama found in many thrillers of this genre and as the plot unfolds it pulls us bit by bit into a world of upper level finance and the covert operations of world intelligence agencies. This is an adrenaline packed adventure into the black hole of international diplomacies. The end result is an engaging page turner that will keep you intrigued for hours.
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His previous books were well worth the read and I looked forward to his latest, unfortuenly it was lacking. Ignatius is a very interesting and knowledgeable person on the countries that we are presently fighting in. The end was predictable in the first part of the book, the only suspense was would the pages reveal anything of sustenance, sadly they did not.