Bloodstar (Star Corpsman Series #1) [NOOK Book]

Overview

In the 23rd Century, war is still hell . . .

Navy Corpsman Elliot Carlyle joined up to save lives and see the universe. Now he and Bravo Company's Black Wizards of the interstellar Fleet Marine Force are en route to Bloodworld—a hellish, volatile rock colonized by the fanatical Salvationists who desired an inhospitable world where they could suffer for humanity's sins. Their penance could prove fatal—for the Qesh, a strange alien race detected ...

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Bloodstar (Star Corpsman Series #1)

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Overview

In the 23rd Century, war is still hell . . .

Navy Corpsman Elliot Carlyle joined up to save lives and see the universe. Now he and Bravo Company's Black Wizards of the interstellar Fleet Marine Force are en route to Bloodworld—a hellish, volatile rock colonized by the fanatical Salvationists who desired an inhospitable world where they could suffer for humanity's sins. Their penance could prove fatal—for the Qesh, a strange alien race detected but still mysterious for six decades, have made violent first contact.

Suddenly countless lives depend upon Bravo Company—perhaps even the fate of homeworld Earth itself—as the Marines prepare to confront a vast force of powerful, inscrutable enemies. And one dedicated medic, singled out by an extraordinary act of valor, will find himself with an astounding opportunity to alter the universe forever . . .

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780062197993
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 8/28/2012
  • Series: Star Corpsman Series , #1
  • Sold by: HARPERCOLLINS
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 368
  • Sales rank: 14,271
  • File size: 2 MB

Meet the Author

Ian Douglas, one of the many pseudonyms for writer William H. Keith, is the New York Times bestselling author of the popular military SF series The Heritage Trilogy, The Legacy Trilogy, The Inheritance Trilogy, and the ongoing Star Carrier and Star Corpsman series. A former naval corpsman, he lives in Pennsylvania.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 19 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(11)

4 Star

(4)

3 Star

(3)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(1)

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Sort by: Showing all of 19 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 30, 2013

    A Good Book, Not A Great Book

    Despite the lukewarm title of my review I thought this was a well written book in the military sci-fi style I like. I didn't enjoy it as much as my favorite authors, David Drake and Jerry Pournelle but I wasn't disappointed. The technology was well thought out but nothing original. Armored power suits, nanobots and the like. What the props lacked in originality the details more than made up for. I liked the use of a Navy Corpsman as the main character, it gave the story an interesting spin. I also liked the use of the Encyclopedia Galactica, a device that's been used in science fiction since I think Issac Asimov used it. I like that the humans know there are other races in the universe and rather than being surprised by first contact they have made plans on how to deal with superior races. It's one of those things that just seems logical. I also liked the emphasis on the Marine Corps camaraderie.

    There were a few little details such as the mention of the Kobayashi Maru that were amusing. He mentions Arthur C. Clarke and kind of pays tribute to older science fiction authors and stories. I like that, it shows the author is a fan also. There were a few instances of the action not being what it first appeared to be such as a dream sequence that felt kind of like a cheap tactic, more fitting for a bad t.v. show than a book.

    The one big issue that holds me back is the story telling itself. So much of it is very workman like. Ian Douglas apparently either has a background in medicine or did a lot of research for this story. Whichever is the case, he tried to share as much information on the subject as he could fit in the book. I don't mind long dissertations on scientific subjects in a book like this ("hard" science fiction stories are my favorite for that reason) but a few times the narrative slowed the flow of the action. Sometimes less is more.

    The other problem I had was the anti-religious tone of the story. I'm not religious but I enjoy books that explore a subject and authors that can look at both sides with some type of objectivity. The colonists from Bloodworld are the typical one dimensional "religious nuts" you see in media everywhere these days. It would of been more interesting to me to see a deeper characterization of the colonists and see what role politics played in the story. That was always something I liked about the Hammer's Slammers and Von Falkenberg stories. There was a little political intrigue going on with the story. The author kind of touches on this but the questions he raises remain unexplored. I haven't read the second one yet so maybe that's something that is addressed in that book.

    Over all this is a good book and I'll definitely pick up the sequel.

    6 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 2, 2013

    After a third of the way thru this book, all I've been given is

    After a third of the way thru this book, all I've been given is a lot of medical advice and a complete future history that is too detailed and not very interesting. What little of the main character in the story so far is not someone I want to stay with for the rest of the book. This is only the second book in all the books I've read that I probably won't finish and a few of them, while not the best, at least kept my interest One star is for his effort. Have read other books by this author and enjoyed them. Not this one.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 26, 2012

    Another excellent read!!

    Ian Doublas (William H. Keith) writes modern science fiction in the style of Robert Heinlein, regular folk type characters and episodic flow. I have all of his books and look forward to the next installements in all of his series. With his medial background this is his first series in the same sub genre as James White (Sector General), and the use of medical terminology is not overused but so easy to understand. If you like good military science fiction, this is a great book and the excellent start to another good Douglas series.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 3, 2012

    It's good as Star Corps

    I can see Ian spent some time reviewing medical terminology. Also utilizing a Navy Corpsman as the Subject is a nice idea. I like the idea of a past romance lost and a new romance beginning. The order of kapture the Brain logic isn't old but the term Zombie can be a bit much unless the Subject continues to die a nd re-Kaptured as in the Terminology. The suspence is is right for the situation and meeting new Aliens and killing them is a marine term. Alien description is really exceptional. I like it I hope his sequel will continue with some intersting technological leaps.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 28, 2012

    Highly Recommended

    Great read, couldn't put it down

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 10, 2013

    Good authentic read for mlitary medicine

    Author knows his stuff. Looking for chapter /episode 2 in the series.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 22, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    VERY GOOD READ

    I enjoy most everything Ian Douglas writes. Star Corpsman is no exception.
    It's well written and a fun read.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 23, 2013

    lots of detail - maybe a tad too much but still a great read

    lots of detail - maybe a tad too much but still a great read

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 7, 2014

    OK, but no more

    Even when he is not at his best, Ian Douglas is better than a lot of other SF writers. This book is no exception. All in all, it makes for a good read. The only problem with it, is too much "fillers". The author seems to have dumped every line of research that he's done for the book and every piece of knowledge he has about the human anatomy into pages upon pages of boring material which does not advance the plot at all. You could really tell that he was counting the words to make sure he has the minimum required. If I could edit this book, I'd throw out about 25% of the mumbo jumbo. The rest would be OK.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 25, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 10, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 14, 2014

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 3, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 11, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 3, 2014

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 30, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 11, 2014

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 18, 2014

    No text was provided for this review.

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