Bloodstoppers & Bearwalkers: Folk Traditions of Michigan's Upper Peninsula (Third Edition) / Edition 3

Bloodstoppers & Bearwalkers: Folk Traditions of Michigan's Upper Peninsula (Third Edition) / Edition 3

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by Richard M. Dorson
     
 

Remote and rugged, Michigan’s Upper Peninsula (fondly known as “the U.P.”) has been home to a rich variety of indigenous peoples and Old World immigrants—a heritage deeply embedded in today’s “Yooper” culture. Ojibwes, French Canadians, Finns, Cornish, Poles, Italians, Slovenians, and others have all lived here, attracted to

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Overview

Remote and rugged, Michigan’s Upper Peninsula (fondly known as “the U.P.”) has been home to a rich variety of indigenous peoples and Old World immigrants—a heritage deeply embedded in today’s “Yooper” culture. Ojibwes, French Canadians, Finns, Cornish, Poles, Italians, Slovenians, and others have all lived here, attracted to the area by its timber, mineral ore, and fishing grounds. Mixing local happenings with supernatural tales and creatively adapting traditional stories to suit changing audiences, the diverse inhabitants of the U.P. have created a wealth of lore populated with tricksters, outlaws, cunning trappers and poachers, eccentric bosses of the mines and lumber camps, “bloodstoppers” gifted with the lifesaving power to stop the flow of blood, “bearwalkers” able to assume the shape of bears, and more.
            For folklorist Richard M. Dorson, who ventured into the region in the late 1940s, the U.P. was a living laboratory, a storyteller’s paradise. Bloodstoppers and Bearwalkers, based on his extensive fieldwork in the area, is his richest and most enduring work. This new edition, with a critical introduction and an appendix of additional tales selected by James P. Leary, restores and expands Dorson’s classic contribution to American folklore. Engaging and well informed, the book presents and ponders the folk narratives of the region’s loggers, miners, lake sailors, trappers, and townsfolk. Unfolding the variously peculiar and raucous tales of the U.P., Bloodstoppers and Bearwalkers reveals a vital component of Upper Midwest culture and a fascinating cross-section of American society.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780299227142
Publisher:
University of Wisconsin Press
Publication date:
04/28/2008
Edition description:
3
Pages:
408
Sales rank:
1,416,163
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.25(h) x 1.00(d)

Table of Contents

Introduction James P. Leary Leary, James P.

The Background of This Book 1

Pt. I The Indian Tradition

1 Indians Stuffed and Live 15

2 Bearwalkers 26

3 Tricksters and Thunders 38

Pt. II The European Tradition

4 Canadiens 69

5 Cousin Jacks 103

6 Finns 123

7 Bloodstoppers 150

Pt. III The Native Tradition

8 Townsfolk 169

9 Lumberjacks 186

10 Miners 211

11 Lakesmen 231

12 Sagamen 249

Notes on the Tales 275

More Commentary and Tales from the Upper Peninsula 299

From "Aunt Jane Goudreau: Roup-Garou Storyteller" 302

"Peninsula Characters" 312

From "Polish Wonder Tales of Joe Woods" 313

From "Polish Tales from Joe Woods" 330

From "Dialect Stories of the Upper Peninsula: A New Form of American Folklore" 333

From "Finnish American Dialect Stories Told by Charles Follo of Escanaba, Michigan" 356

From "Big Eaters" 360

Index 365

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