Bloody Crimes [NOOK Book]

Overview

On the morning of April 2, 1865, Jefferson Davis, president of the Confederacy, received a telegram from General Robert E. Lee. There is no more time—the Yankees are coming, it warned. Shortly before midnight, Davis boarded a train from Richmond and fled the capital, setting off an intense and thrilling chase in which Union cavalry hunted the Confederate president.

Two weeks later, President Lincoln was assassinated, and the nation was convinced that Davis was involved in the ...

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Bloody Crimes

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Overview

On the morning of April 2, 1865, Jefferson Davis, president of the Confederacy, received a telegram from General Robert E. Lee. There is no more time—the Yankees are coming, it warned. Shortly before midnight, Davis boarded a train from Richmond and fled the capital, setting off an intense and thrilling chase in which Union cavalry hunted the Confederate president.

Two weeks later, President Lincoln was assassinated, and the nation was convinced that Davis was involved in the conspiracy that led to the crime. Lincoln's murder, autopsy, and White House funeral transfixed the nation. His final journey began when soldiers placed his corpse aboard a special train that would carry him home on the 1,600-mile trip to Springfield. Along the way, more than a million Americans looked upon their martyr's face, and several million watched the funeral train roll by. It was the largest and most magnificent funeral pageant in American history.

To the Union, Davis was no longer merely a traitor. He became a murderer, a wanted man with a $100,000 bounty on his head. Davis was hunted down and placed in captivity, the beginning of an intense and dramatic odyssey that would transform him into a martyr of the South's Lost Cause.

The saga that began with Manhunt continues with the suspenseful and electrifying Bloody Crimes. James Swanson masterfully weaves together the stories of two fallen leaders as they made their last expeditions through the bloody landscape of a wounded nation.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780061989858
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 9/28/2010
  • Sold by: HARPERCOLLINS
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 512
  • Sales rank: 97,535
  • File size: 2 MB

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 75 )
Rating Distribution

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(26)

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(21)

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(16)

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(8)

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(4)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 76 Customer Reviews
  • Posted August 23, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    terrific historical account of two presidents

    On April 2, 1865, Confederate General Lee sends a telegram to President Jefferson Davis warning him the Yankee armies were heading to Richmond. Davis immediately stopped what he was doing and fled the capital by train. The next day the North took Richmond. Over the next twelve days the Northern military intensely searched for Davis proclaimed a traitor as the Confederacy imploded under the assault.

    On the evening of April 14, 1865, John Wilkes Booth assassinates President Lincoln who was attending a play at the Ford Theater in Washington DC; other by co-conspirators assaults failed to kill the intended victims. Lincoln was pronounced dead the next morning while Wilkes fled the city. As the hunt for Wilkes intensified, the funeral process of President Lincoln began on April 19 in DC and from there by train until arriving in Springfield on May 3; millions watched the procession. Davis is called a co-conspirator murderer. Ironically while Lincoln became martyred for the ages; Davis once captured became martyred for the South's Lost Cause.

    This is a fascinating comparison of the fates of two presidents in April 1865 as James L. Swanson intertwines their stories. The Lincoln segue is very passionate as the grief of mourners watching the train roll by will impact readers. The Davis segue is more exciting, but lacks the emotional intensity of the juxtaposed Lincoln piece. Enhanced by black and white photos, Bloody Crimes is a terrific historical account of two presidents although not as exhilarating as the superb Manhunt for Wilkes.

    Harriet Klausner

    13 out of 15 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 28, 2010

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    Bridget's Review

    I enjoyed this book. I wouldn't say it's one of my favorite's but it certainly held my attention. James has a way of picking a reader out of the real world and showing them a glimpse of the past. If you like the synopsis, I'm sure you'll enjoy the book.

    8 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 5, 2011

    Highly Recommended - A MUST READ for any Civil War Buff

    James Swanson has written a masterpiece. I was glued to this book on my Nook Color from the first moment I picked it up. Mr. Swanson finely details the events of the Lincoln assassination and the search for Jefferson Davis. I am a history instructor, and was very impressed with how easy of a read that Mr. Swanson's book was to read and follow. Mr. Swanson had me in total awe of every event of those terrible days in 1865. It was absolutely amazing to me the parallel lives that both Lincoln and Jefferson lived. This book is amazing and one that every serious reader of Civil War history should read. It should be required reading in any Civil War history course. Great Job Mr. Swanson. R. Howell Harlingen, Texas

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 29, 2012

    Loved it! Must read.

    Great read for history nerds like me.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 26, 2012

    Excellent read!

    This book is engaging and informative! I love the way the author tells the stories of Lincoln and Davis the way it occurred-Davis living his life unaware of the fact that Lincoln was dead made this book particularly fascinating to me.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 29, 2012

    Excellent!

    Great read.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 11, 2011

    The Title is Misleading

    This book is ideal, if you have an interest in every tiny detail of Abraham Lincoln's funeral. I found this book to be quite a drag, almost like Lincoln's endless funeral. The more interesting parts of the book involved the flight of Jefferson Davis. The title of the book sounds like it will be a thriller and it isn't.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 12, 2014

    I found "Bloody Crimes" to be an incredibly insightful

    I found "Bloody Crimes" to be an incredibly insightful and great read!

    Bloody Crimes revealed that the late US President Lincoln and abolitionist "John Brown" shared an similar sentiment regarding ending slavery in the US.

    The last note "John Brown" would ever write stated, "I, John Brown, am now quite certain that the crimes of this guilty land will never be purged away but with blood."

    Often overlooked in his second inaugural address, Lincoln stated, "Fondly do we hope, fervently do we pray, that this mighty scourge of war may speedily pass away. Yet, if God wills that it continue until all the wealth piled by the bondsman's two hundred and fifty years of unrequited toil shall be sunk, and until every drop of blood drawn with the lash shall be paid by another drawn with the sword, as was said three thousand years ago, so still it must be said "the judgments of the Lord are true and righteous altogether."

    In the end, slavery in the US ended as John Brown envisioned.

    With regard to the "Truth vs. Myth' regarding whether or not Jefferson Davis worn a woman's raglan coat, the answer can be found in simply verifying which way the coat he was captured in buttons up.

    Women's coats are buttoned "right-over-left," while men's costs are buttoned "left-over-right."

    Besides, what would be the point in "disguising" Jefferson Davis as a "man" when the Union soldiers were looking for a "man."

    "Bloody Crimes" is a highly recommended read...a must read.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 8, 2013

    Fascinating subject on several fronts! An excellent follow up to

    Fascinating subject on several fronts! An excellent follow up to Manhunt! Definitely a must read!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 25, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Recommend it.

    It's a great read but it was also heavy handed going from the funeral train of Abraham Lincoln to the Chase for Jefferson Davis and back again.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 19, 2014

    A great read, I love how Mr Swanson tells the two stories as the

    A great read, I love how Mr Swanson tells the two stories as they are unfolding so it felt like everything was continuous.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 14, 2013

    July 14 2013

    Awsome details on this book

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 76 Customer Reviews

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