Bloody Moments: And Further Highlights from the Astounding History of Medicine

Bloody Moments: And Further Highlights from the Astounding History of Medicine

by Gael Jennings, Roland Harvey
     
 

Hugely entertaining and wildly offbeat, here is a book that combines engaging, humorous text with illustrations that at once set the tone of the book.

Mabel is on a battlefield in the middle of blood and guts. It is 1536 in France and the Siege of Turin rages around her. But how did she get here? It all starts when Mabel is home sick. Nothing good is on TV and

Overview

Hugely entertaining and wildly offbeat, here is a book that combines engaging, humorous text with illustrations that at once set the tone of the book.

Mabel is on a battlefield in the middle of blood and guts. It is 1536 in France and the Siege of Turin rages around her. But how did she get here? It all starts when Mabel is home sick. Nothing good is on TV and it's raining outside. She is bored, bored, bored, and grumpy.

Then a slimy envelope with "The Guts of Human Life" written on it plops through the letter slot. The package contains a mysterious red CD-ROM. When she inserts it into the computer, Mabel is suddenly drawn into the past and through all sorts of hilarious, amazing, disgusting and TRUE adventures in the history of medicine.

Join Mabel as she learns how medical discoveries are made...

  • Go back to the times before antibiotics or anesthetics, when bloodletting, leeches and spirits in the cosmos all played parts in healing.
  • Meet Andreas Vesalius, the Father of Anatomy.
  • Study digestion first-hand through a 6 inch gunshot hole in Alexis St Martin's stomach.
  • Take a peek at germs in 1683 through the first microscope.
  • Stumble upon the idea of vaccinations with Louis Pasteur as he tests his chickens for cholera.
  • Watch Florence Nightingale fight germs and sickness with a revolutionary new idea: cleanliness.
  • Drift gently into Alexander Fleming's germ plate with the mold spore that enables the discovery of penicillin.

Each page brings a new leap forward and a couple of stumbles backwards. Skip ahead to follow specific discoveries or go page by page. This is no dry regurgitation of historical fact, but a bold marriage of text and art, funny to the bone and providing a sizable dose of medical highlights from across the spectrum of time. An index is included so you can easily find your favorite ailment. Readers will return to the book time and again for the simple enjoyment it delivers.

Editorial Reviews

Horn Book Guide
Readers will find the cartoon-style illustrations both fascinating and gross, and the action-packed text will not disappoint. A choose-your-own feature encourages browsing.
Science Books and Films - Burton Kallman
A humorous and somewhat vulgar review of biomedical history with colorful (some might say gross) illustrations on every page.
Chicago Tribune - Devin Rose
The illustrations are what will stick with you. They show medicine's triumphs and failures in colorful, blood-spurting detail. You'll learn a lot from this book if you can stomach it.
National Post
Bloody marvelous.
Flint Journal - Jennifer Walking
Pure fascination for kids.
Wayne Suburban - Rhenda Fearrington
This book is hugely entertaining, while being very 'out-of-the-box' in its approach.
The National Post
Bloody marvelous. A new kids' book on the history of medicine proves to be gross, yucky, disgusting and truly educational.
—(August 28, 2000)
Jennifer Walking
Pure fascination for kids.
—(Flint Journal)
Mary R. Hofmann
Most kids will simply wallow in the gross snot, pustules, bloody organs, and gastrointestinal catastrophes.
— (School Library Journal, November 2000)
Rhenda Fearrington
This book is hugely entertaining, while being very out-of-the-box in its approach.
— (Wayne, PA Suburban, August 30, 2000)
Devin Rose
The illustrations are what will stick with you ... You'll learn a lot from this book if you can stomach it.
— (Chicago Tribune, October 3, 2000)
Burton Kallman
A humorous and somewhat vulgar review of biomedical history with colorful (some might say gross) illustrations on every page.
Children's Literature
A delightfully grotesque look at where medicine began and how far it has come since the early days of pouring boiling oil into wounds and sticking smallpox scabs up ones nose. Jennings gets plenty of useful information in among the gross-outs, such as the first attempts at disinfectants, vaccinations, anesthesia and pasteurization. Harvey's comically icky depictions of smallpox blisters, gangrenous flesh, botched dissections and the like are sure to make kids linger over the pages and maybe they will absorb some pretty interesting facts. A fun way to get kids interested in the history of health. 2000, Annick Press. Ages 8 to 11. Reviewer: Donna Freedman
School Library Journal
Gr 5-8-In an attempt to pander to the blood-and-guts crowd, this book takes a fascinating collection of gruesome, historical medical problems, treatments, and discoveries and juxtaposes them against a backdrop of strange cartoons and a ridiculous subplot. Nerdy, bespectacled Mabel, home with a messy cold, receives a mysterious, slimy package containing a CD-ROM. In a virtual trance, she is transported back in time and careens through medical history in a mad jumble of wild colors (red, of course, predominates), different fonts and type sizes, and cartoons that seem to parody the problems rather than illustrate them. The facts are undeniably compelling. Savvy students may learn something about body systems, germs and viruses, monstrous medical procedures, and the famous (and infamous) men and women who brought the hope of health to the masses. Unfortunately, most kids will simply wallow in the gross snot, pustules, bloody organs, and gastrointestinal catastrophes. The text concludes with a section on cloning and designer transplants with the questions: "What is a miracle? And what is a monstrosity?" Science teachers could effectively use some of these pages to spice up an occasional lesson but, generally, the irreverent tone is inappropriate and overly sensationalized.-Mary R. Hofmann, Rivera Middle School, Merced, CA Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781550376432
Publisher:
Annick Press, Limited
Publication date:
09/02/2000
Pages:
80
Product dimensions:
9.00(w) x 10.75(h) x (d)
Age Range:
8 - 12 Years

Meet the Author

Gael Jennings has a Ph.D. on the working of the immune system and, happily, a twisted sense of humor. After eight years in medical research, she turned from doing science to talking about it, working for the Australian Broadcasting Corporation for thirteen years, including science and medical reporting on TV.

Roland Harvey has been illustrating since he was two, so he has had lots of practice perfecting an art style both playful and amusing. He is the illustrator of many books for children, winning awards in his native Australia.

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