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The Bloody Streets of Paris
     

The Bloody Streets of Paris

by Jacques Tardi, Art Spiegelman (Foreword by), Leo Malet
 

In order to fulfill a dying man's plea, detective Nestor Burma finds himself quickly enmeshed in a dangerous web of deceit and betrayal involving French collaborators and the terrifying all-powerful Gestapo. It will take all his skills as a detective to say alive and free, for in Nazi-held France, there are fates worse than death.

Overview

In order to fulfill a dying man's plea, detective Nestor Burma finds himself quickly enmeshed in a dangerous web of deceit and betrayal involving French collaborators and the terrifying all-powerful Gestapo. It will take all his skills as a detective to say alive and free, for in Nazi-held France, there are fates worse than death.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Adapted from the late author Malet's 1942 novel, 120, Rue de la Gare, this old-fashioned, highly entertaining detective story has real heft. The story takes place during the German occupation of France, in a POW camp where a detective, Nestor Burma, meets a mysterious amnesiac with a specific message. The story moves to Lyon, then Paris, as Burma attempts to understand the connection between the amnesiac and the murder of a colleague. In doing so-as in any good detective story-he gets embroiled in an intricate plot that remains ambiguous until the book's final pages. Along with the fun, suspenseful narrative and snappy dialogue, there's the backdrop of curfews, rationing and other details of life under occupation. Though never addressed directly, WWII adds an ominous and culturally intriguing dimension to the story. Tardi makes gorgeous comics; his loose cartoon line flirts with realism, but never restricts his drawing's fluidity. His characters are set against realistically rendered wartime backgrounds, making the book a remarkable piece of historical documentary. Because Tardi's detail-oriented approach and moody graphics sync so well with the tone and specificity of Malet's writing, the artist is able to bring the story to life while still retaining all of its heart-a rare feat for a comics adaptation. The text translation is excellent, and the book only falters in its presentation. The paper is thin and flimsy, and the publisher adds a vague historical introduction, as well as poorly written biographies of Tardi and Malet. These stumbles are atypical of this otherwise excellent comic, a rare treat for lovers of comics, art and mysteries. (Dec. 2003) Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Library Journal
Tardi is one of France's most acclaimed graphic novelists, and this oversized black-and-white book is his adaptation of 120 Rue de la Gare, a famous French murder mystery by Malet originally published in 1942. It was the first of almost 30 books to feature Malet's character Nestor Burma. During Germany's occupation of France during World War II, P.I. and French soldier Burma is in the infirmary of a German prison camp when he hears a nameless amnesiac blurt out a mysterious message-"Tell Helene, 120 Rue de la Gare"-before dying. After he's released, Burma meets an old friend who also mentions the address before being shot and killed. Burma's investigation leads the reader through a long trail of misdirection and mistakes before ending with a surprising and satisfying conclusion. The story's backdrop of occupied France will be unusual and interesting for American readers, and Tardi's art depicts the French urban landscape in excellent detail while giving the figures a more cartoony look. With some nudity, ibooks rates this for "mature readers"; recommended for all adult collections. Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780743474481
Publisher:
ibooks, Incorporated
Publication date:
12/09/2003
Pages:
192
Product dimensions:
8.32(w) x 11.12(h) x 0.42(d)

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