Bloom's Literary Themes: Enslavement and Emancipation

Overview

The great literary themes reappear continually throughout the world's literature. Bloom's Literary Themes is a new series that examines these themes as they function in classic literary works, from the Bible to the novels of Toni Morrison and Philip Roth.

Perhaps the most famous treatment of the themes of enslavement and emancipation is in the biblical Book of Exodus, but the two themes continue to be prominent in great literature today. This volume contains 20 essays that ...

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Overview

The great literary themes reappear continually throughout the world's literature. Bloom's Literary Themes is a new series that examines these themes as they function in classic literary works, from the Bible to the novels of Toni Morrison and Philip Roth.

Perhaps the most famous treatment of the themes of enslavement and emancipation is in the biblical Book of Exodus, but the two themes continue to be prominent in great literature today. This volume contains 20 essays that explore the role of enslavement and emancipation in such works as Beloved, the speeches of Abraham Lincoln, A Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, A Room of One's Own, the novels of Elie Wiesel and many others. Some essays have been written specifically for the series; others are excerpts of important critical analyses from selected books and journals.

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Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal
Gr 10 Up—The 20 essays in these compilations explore classical works of literature—novels, plays, short stories, letters, or speeches—with a common thematic thread. Sources analyzed in Civil Disobedience include excerpts from George Orwell's 1984, Herman Melville's "Bartleby, the Scrivener," Arthur Miller's The Crucible, and speeches by Malcolm X. Excerpts in Enslavement and Emancipation discuss Toni Morrison's Beloved, the Declaration of Independence, various slave narratives, and some of Elie Wiesel's novels. Both titles address Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and the poetry of Langston Hughes, modeling for readers how to approach literature from different theoretical and thematic perspectives. Entries include seminal analyses from scholarly journals and books, as well as pieces written for these volumes. The latter are far more accessible for readers new to literary criticism. Fortunately, the other essays open with helpful introductions that outline the authors' arguments, central questions, and point of view. A handful of entries include section headings to guide readers through dense critical material. Background knowledge is needed to comprehend Bloom's series introduction and his take on the "perpetually crucial" topics covered in the books. Extensive bibliographies are a goldmine for further research, and some essays introduce the critical volleys between literary scholars. Solid selections for Advanced Placement curricula.—Amy Pickett, Ridley High School, Folsom, PA
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781604134414
  • Publisher: Chelsea House Publishers
  • Publication date: 4/1/2010
  • Series: Bloom's Literary Themes Series
  • Pages: 304
  • Product dimensions: 6.30 (w) x 9.30 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Table of Contents

Series Introduction Harold Bloom: Themes and Metaphors xi

Volume Introduction Harold Bloom xv

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Mark Twain 1

"The Paradox of Liberation in Huckleberry Finn" Neil Schmitz, in Texas Studies in Literature and Language (1971)

Beloved Toni Morrison 15

"Beloved and the Transforming Power of The Word" Louise Cowan, in Classic Texts and the Nature of Authority (1993)

"The Death of Ivan Ilych" Leo Tolstoy 27

"The Death and Emancipation of Ivan Ilych" Merritt Moseley

The Declaration of Independence Thomas Jefferson 37

"Thomas Jefferson and the Great Declaration" Moses Coit Tyler, in The Literary History of the American Revolution, 1763-1783 (1897)

The Book of Exodus 63

"Exodus" Allen Dwight Callahan, in The Talking Book: African Americans and the Bible (2006)

The Poetry of Langston Hughes 85

"'Racial Individuality': Enslavement and Emancipation in the Poetry of Langston Hughes" Robert C. Evans

Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl Harriet Jacobs 93

"Moral Experience in Harriet Jacobs's Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl" Sarah Way Sherman, in NWSA Journal(1990)

The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano, or Gustavus Vassa, the African, Written by Himself Olaudah Equiano 117

"Review of The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano, or Gustavus Vassa, the African, Written by Himself Mary Wollstonecraft, in Analytical Review (1789)

"In the Penal Colony" (Franz Kafka) 121

"Enslavement and Emancipation in Franz Kafka's 'In the Penal Colony'" Lorena Russell

The Speeches of Abraham Lincoln 133

"Lincoln the Literary Genius" Jacques Barzun, in The Saturday Evening Post (1959)

A Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, a Slave Frederick Douglass 147

"The Slave" Frederic May Holland, in Frederick Douglass; The Colored Orator (1891)

One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn 165

'"Art isn't what you do, it's how you do it': Enslavement, Ideology, and Emancipation in Solzhenitsyn's One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich" John Becker

Robinson Crusoe Daniel Defoe 177

"Enslavement and Emancipation in Robinson Crusoe" Luca Prono

A Room of One's Own Virginia Woolf 185

"Images of Enslavement and Emancipation in Virginia Woolf's A Room of One's Own" Deborah C. Solomon

Siddhartha Hermann Hesse 197

"The Search for Emancipation in Herman Hesse's Siddhartha" H. Elizabeth Smith

The Tempest William Shakespeare 209

"'...with my nobler reason 'gainst my fury/Do I take part': Enslavement and Emancipation in Shakespeare's The Tempest" Robert C. Evans

A Vindication of the Rights of Women and Woman in the Nineteenth Century Mary Wollstonecraft Margaret Fuller 221

"Margaret Fuller and Mary Wollstonecraft" George Eliot, in Leader (1855)

Visions of the Daughters of Albion William Blake 229

"Blake's Vision of Slavery" David Erdman, in Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes (1952)

The Poetry of Phillis Wheatley 245

"Emancipating Phillis Wheatley" Deborah James

The Novels of Elie Wiesel 255

"Witness to the Absurd: Elic Wiesel and the French Existentialists" Mary Jean Green, in Renascence (1977)

Acknowledgments 275

Index 277

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