Bloom's Literary Themes: The Taboo

Overview

The great literary themes reappear continually throughout he world's literature. Bloom's Literary Themes is a new series that examines these themes as they function in classic literary works, form the Bible to the novels of Toni Morrison and Philip Roth.

From a Polynesian word meaning "prohibition," the term taboo refers to a social more that should never be broken. This volume contains 20 essays that explore the role of the taboo in such works as Dracula, Lolita, Lord of the ...

See more details below
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (7) from $10.96   
  • New (3) from $42.75   
  • Used (4) from $10.96   
Note: Kids' Club Eligible. See More Details.
Sending request ...

Overview

The great literary themes reappear continually throughout he world's literature. Bloom's Literary Themes is a new series that examines these themes as they function in classic literary works, form the Bible to the novels of Toni Morrison and Philip Roth.

From a Polynesian word meaning "prohibition," the term taboo refers to a social more that should never be broken. This volume contains 20 essays that explore the role of the taboo in such works as Dracula, Lolita, Lord of the Flies, "A Rose for Emily," Ulysses, and many others. Some essays have been written specifically for the series; others are excerpts of important critical analyses from selected books and journals.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781604134445
  • Publisher: Chelsea House Publishers
  • Publication date: 4/1/2010
  • Series: Bloom's Literary Themes Series
  • Pages: 292
  • Product dimensions: 6.30 (w) x 9.30 (h) x 0.80 (d)

Table of Contents

Series Introduction by Harold Bloom: Themes and Metaphors xi

Volume Introduction Harold Bloom xv

Confessions of an English Opium Eater Thomas De Quincey 1

"Les Paradis Artificiels" Charles Baudelaire, in Les Paradis Artificiels (1860)

Dracula Bram Stoker 23

"Suddenly Sexual Women in Bram Stoker's Dracula" Phyllis A. Roth, in Literature and Psychology (1977)

Howl Allen Ginsberg 37

"Transgression, Release, and 'Moloch'" Jeffrey Gray

Julius Caesar William Shakespeare 51

"Totem, Taboo, and Julius Caesar" Cynthia Marshall, in Literature and Psychology (1991)

Lady Chatterley's Lover D.H. Lawrence 77

"1925-30" Frank Kermode, in D.H. Lawrence (1973)

Lolita Vladimir Nabokov 91

"'I have only words to play with:' Taboo and Tradition in Nabokov's Lolita" Samuel Schuman

Lord of the Flies William Golding 99

"Men of a Smaller Growth: A Psychological Analysis of William Golding's Lord of the Flies" Claire Rosenfield, in Literature and Psychology (1961)

"The Miller's Tale" Geoffrey Chaucer 113

"Social and Religious Taboos in Chaucer's The Miller's Tale" Robert C. Evans

"The mother" Gwendolyn Brooks 123

"The Taboo in Gwendolyn Brooks' 'the mother'" Kate Falvey

Mourning Becomes Electra Eugene O'Neill 133

"'I Forgive Myself!': Escaping the Ever-Present Past in Eugene O'Neill's Mourning Becomes Electra" Scott Walters

Oedipus Tyrannus Sophocles 143

"Chapter Nine" Friedrich Nietzsche, in The Birth of Tragedy (1872)

The Picture of Dorian Gray Oscar Wilde 147

"Taboo in The Picture of Dorian Gray" Arundhati Sanyal

The Poetry and Prose of Sylvia Plath 157

"'God's Lioness'-Sylvia Plath, Her Prose and Poetry" Wendy Martin, in Women's Studies (1973)

"A Rose for Emily" William Faulkner 165

"Usher, Poquelin, and Miss Emily: the Progress of Southern Gothic" Edward Stone, in Georgia Review (1960)

Sabbath's Theater Philip Roth 177

"The Taboo in Philip Roth's Sabbath's Theater" Julia F. Klimek

The Satanic Verses Salman Rushdie 189

"Breaking Totems and Taboos: Rushdie' The Satanic Verses" Rossitsa Artemis

The Poetry of Anne Sexton 199

"The Poetic Heroism of Anne Sexton" Diana Hume George, in Literature and Psychology (1987)

The Prose Works of Jonathan Swift 217

"Biographical Introduction" W.E.H. Lecky, in Swift's Tale of a Tub and Other Early Works (1897)

Tess of the D'Urbervilles Thomas Hardy 227

"Tess of the D'Urbervilles: The 'Pure Woman'" Geoffrey Wagner, in Five for Freedom: A Study of Feminist Fiction

Ulysses James Joyce 251

"Fetishizing the Bread of Everyday Life: The Taboo Gaze in 'Nausicaa'" Blake Hobby Dustin Ryan

Acknowledgments 259

Index 261

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)