The Blue Afternoon

The Blue Afternoon

3.0 1
by William Boyd
     
 

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"A perfect-pitch story of love and redemption" (The New York Times), Boyd's atmospheric new novel confirms his reputation as heir to the grand narrative traditions of Joseph Conrad and Somerset Maugham. In 1936 Los angeles, as her long-estranged father tells architect Kay Fischer the story behind her secret parentage, he plunges readers into a tale of grisly murders…  See more details below

Overview

"A perfect-pitch story of love and redemption" (The New York Times), Boyd's atmospheric new novel confirms his reputation as heir to the grand narrative traditions of Joseph Conrad and Somerset Maugham. In 1936 Los angeles, as her long-estranged father tells architect Kay Fischer the story behind her secret parentage, he plunges readers into a tale of grisly murders and an illicit passion that still obsseses him 30 years later. 384 pp. Author tour.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Boyd's new novel should carry a label advising readers that an intriguing narrative is initially obscured beneath a plot device that almost ruins the whole thing: in 1936, Los Angeles architect Kay Fisher is approached by elderly Salvadore Carriscant, who tells her he's her father and whisks her off on an improbable journey to Lisbon. Despite that unconvincing framing section, a fascinating love story-cum-murder mystery occupies the heart of the narrative, which flashes back to 1902 Manila. There, the young Carriscant, a brilliant surgeon, falls in love with Daphne Sieverance, the wife of an American colonel whose troops are stationed in the Philippines to quell a bloody insurrection. When two American soldiers are murdered by someone who eviscerates their internal organs, Carriscant helps the chief of the constabulary, the improbably named Paton Bobby, to locate the killer, whom Carriscant suspects but cannot accuse. In this middle section of the novel Boyd suspensefully orchestrates some diabolically clever events, including a fatal air crash, a scene reminiscent of Romeo and Juliet and a shocking climax that will send readers reeling. With the same sure hand that has distinguished the settings of his previous books (A Good Man in Africa; Brazzaville Beach, etc.), he evokes the steamy, fetid atmosphere of old Manila and the class distinctions of the time. He also provides genuinely interesting background detail about medical practice during the days when aseptic surgery was still considered quackery, and about the pioneering years of aeronautics. Much of this novel is as magical as an ``eloquent blue afternoon,'' when the atmosphere is luminescent with magical light. It's too bad that Boyd encased his engrossing central tale in its unwieldy carapace. (Feb.)
Library Journal
Heavily laced with mystery and romance, this intellectual thriller from the author of Brazzaville Beach (LJ 4/1/91) begins in L.A. in 1936 with minimalist architect Kay Fischer's being drawn into the obsessions of a man named Dr. Salvador Carriscant who claims to be her father, then reverts to Manila in 1902, where he was a prominent surgeon. The meat of the story takes place there and includes murders, digressions on early manned flight and turn-of-the-century medical conditions, and a brief, adulterous love affair (Waller-like except for being well written) that informs Carriscant's future after his career is shattered by murder charges. It ends back in the 1930s, in Lisbon, with Kay, Carriscant, a faded 1927 newspaper photo, and a strange reunion. It's too bad that legitimate plot concerns raised in the frame (especially Kay's betrayal by her awful ex-partner) drop from the book entirely, but (as in life?) loose ends predominate in Boyd's world. Smart, intense, recommended.-Robert E. Brown, Onondaga Cty. P.L., Syracuse, N.Y.
Thomas Gaughan
A woman architect in Los Angeles in the 1930s is approached by an elderly man who claims to be her father. Although skeptical, she allows him to convince her to accompany him to Lisbon to search for the lost love of his life. On the trans-Atlantic voyage, he tells her a strange tale of love, murder, honor, and aspiration in the midst of the Philippine insurrection against the U.S. The man, a talented young surgeon, is caught up in a web of treachery and passion, and tragedy seemed preordained. Boyd, a gifted storyteller who loves Third World locales (he also wrote the delightful "A Good Man in Africa"), is at his best here. Steamy, socially stratified, and oppressive Manila, circa 1902, comes to life; so does the practice of medicine at a time when appendicitis was nearly always fatal. Librarians should recommend "The Blue Afternoon" to devotees of historical fiction and romances.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780679432951
Publisher:
Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Publication date:
02/28/1995
Edition description:
1st American ed
Pages:
367
Product dimensions:
5.72(w) x 8.03(h) x 1.21(d)

Meet the Author

William Boyd’s first novel, A Good Man in Africa, won a Whitbread Prize and a Somerset Maugham Award; his second, An Ice-Cream War, was awarded the John Llewellyn Rhys Prize and was shortlisted for the Booker Prize; Brazzaville Beach won the James Tait Black Memorial Prize; and The Blue Afternoon won the Los Angeles Times Prize for Fiction. Boyd lives in London.

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Blue Afternoon 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago