The Blue Fairy Book (Illustrated by H. J. Ford + link to download FREE audiobook + Active TOC) [NOOK Book]

Overview

FEATURES:


• Includes beautiful artworks and illustrations
• A link of a FREE audio book to download at the end of the book
• Active Table of Contents for an easy navigation within the book
• Manually coded and crafted by ...
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The Blue Fairy Book (Illustrated by H. J. Ford + link to download FREE audiobook + Active TOC)

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Overview

FEATURES:


• Includes beautiful artworks and illustrations
• A link of a FREE audio book to download at the end of the book
• Active Table of Contents for an easy navigation within the book
• Manually coded and crafted by professionals for highest formatting quality and standards

Check out ngims Publishing's other illustrated literary classics. The vast majority of our books have original illustrations, free audiobook download link at the end of the book, navigable Table of Contents, and are fully formatted. Browse our library collection by typing in ngims or ngims plus the title you're looking for, e.g. ngims Gulliver's Travels.

Free ebooks on the web are not organized for easy reading, littered with text errors and often have missing contents. You will not find another beautifully formatted classic literature ebook that is well-designed with amazing artworks and illustrations and a link to download free audiobook for a very low price like this one. Our ebooks are hand-coded by professional formatters and programmers. Ebook development and design are the core of what our engineers do. Our ebooks are not the cheap flat text kind, but are built from the ground up with emphasis on proper text formatting and integrity.

Andrew Lang (1844–1912) was a Scots poet, novelist, and literary critic. Although he did not collect the stories himself from the oral tradition, the extent of his sources, who had collected them originally made the collections immensely influential. Lang gave many of the tales their first appearance in English. As acknowledged in the prefaces, although Lang himself made most of the selections, his wife and other translators did a large portion of the translating and retelling of the actual stories. (Wikipedia)
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Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940016706306
  • Publisher: ngims Publishing
  • Publication date: 5/15/2013
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Sales rank: 1,251,377
  • File size: 10 MB

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 29 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(13)

4 Star

(5)

3 Star

(2)

2 Star

(3)

1 Star

(6)

Your Rating:

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 29 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 24, 2008

    Illustrations?

    In the description of the 1st World Publishing edition of this book, it states that the book contains 138 original black and white illustrations, but it contains none! What a disappointment.

    5 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 4, 2013

    I almost didn't buy The Blue Fairy Book because of the reviews t

    I almost didn't buy The Blue Fairy Book because of the reviews that stated there aren't any pictures in it.  There are pictures in the copy I received.  It's the Leatherbound edition.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 14, 2007

    1st of a series of great tales

    This is the kind of book that every child should have in his or her personal library. It is as good as The Arabian Nights but, unfortunately, not as well known. Buy it for your kids and see how happy and excited it makes them.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 12, 2005

    This is the most wonderful fairy story book, ever !

    This book was originally first published in the 1890's. The story-telling style and re-printed art reflect the original. The stories are extremely imaginative and well-written. This is a treasure to grow up with, and will ensure a vast imagination for your young one. Everyone should be so fortunate !

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 20, 2013

    I love this book

    I had this book when i was a kid and it was amazing! It has all the classics from the bronze ring to little red rideing hood to cinderella. Grate book for tweens.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 22, 2011

    Timeless

    I gave it a five because the stories are amazing and timeless. I don't like that they don't have any pictures. If you want to see the original book with the pictures go to google book previews. They have the whole book with the original pictures. Other than that, this is an amazing book that I'm afraid doesn't get much credit these days and that's probably due to the racism that some stories show. I read this book and my parents read this book but kids nowadays don't get to read the original tales, only the cleaned up tales. I wish they would sell these in leather bound or at least hard cover. Oh well...

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 11, 2013

    A wonderful collection of fairy tales. Many favorites of mine ar

    A wonderful collection of fairy tales. Many favorites of mine are in here.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 1, 2011

    Happy

    I rread this for the first time in the second grade. The stories stuck with me even thoigh my memory was vague. I've been searching for uears and now I get too read it again :)

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 9, 2014

    I love this book :) I really hope they plan on coming out with t

    I love this book :) I really hope they plan on coming out with the red fairy book soon! I want the whole collection!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 29, 2013

    Blue Fairy Book

    This is a great book! If you want this and the rest of Lang's color fairy tale books and more, check out "25 Favorite Fairy Tales, Fables, and Mythology Books".

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 29, 2013

    Susie Bunker Date: 10/29/13

    It is a wonderful book, Does any-one else think it's great

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 28, 2013

    Ssuper duper cool more than that Gchtff Super duper cool more than that

    This is aa super book

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 6, 2013

    So confusing

    It is sooo confusing-joyalicous

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 24, 2013

    I love it

    Read this book

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 22, 2013

    Maddy

    Anyone here?

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 10, 2013

    Printing on the spine is off center and embarrassing. After disc

    Printing on the spine is off center and embarrassing. After discovering a bad misprint in "The Wonderful Wizard of Oz" in this collection, I'm starting to be wary. 

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 1, 2013

    In J.D. Salinger's brilliant coming-of-age novel, Holden Caulfie

    In J.D. Salinger's brilliant coming-of-age novel, Holden Caulfield, a seventeen year old prep school adolescent relates his lonely, life-changing twenty-four hour stay in New York City as he experiences the phoniness of the adult world while attempting to deal with the death of his younger brother, an overwhelming compulsion to lie and troubling sexual experiences.
    Salinger, whose characters are among the best and most developed in all of literature has captured the eternal angst of growing into adulthood in the person of Holden Caulfield. Anyone who has reached the age of sixteen will be able to identify with this unique and yet universal character, for Holden contains bits and pieces of all of us. It is for this very reason that The Catcher in the Rye has become one of the most beloved and enduring works in world literature.
    As always, Salinger's writing is so brilliant, his characters so real, that he need not employ artifice of any kind. This is a study of the complex problems haunting all adolescents as they mature into adulthood and Salinger wisely chooses to keep his narrative and prose straightforward and simple.
    This is not to say that The Catcher in the Rye is a straightforward and simple book. It is anything but. In it we are privy to Salinger's genius and originality in portraying universal problems in a unique manner. The Catcher in the Rye is a book that can be loved and understood on many different levels of comprehension and each reader who experiences it will come away with a fresh view of the world in which they live.
    A work of true genius, images of a catcher in the rye are abundantly apparent throughout this book.
    While analyzing the city raging about him, Holden's attention is captured by a child walking in the street "singing and humming." Realizing that the child is singing the familiar refrain, "If a body meet a body, comin' through the rye," Holden, himself, says that he feels "not so depressed."
    The title's words, however, are more than just a pretty ditty that Holden happens to like. In the stroke of pure genius that is Salinger, himself, he wisely sums up the book's theme in its title.
    When Holden, whose past has been traumatic, to say the least, is questioned by his younger sister, Phoebe, regarding what he would like to do when he gets older, Holden replies, "Anyway, I keep picturing all these little kids playing some game in this big field of rye and all. Thousands of little kids, and nobody's around--nobody big, I mean--except me. And I'm standing on the edge of some crazy cliff. What I have to do, I have to catch everybody if they start to go over the cliff--I mean if they're running and they don't look where they're going. I have to come out from somewhere and catch them. That's all I'd do all day. I'd just be the catcher in the rye and all. I know it's crazy, but that's the only thing I'd really like to be."
    In this short bit of dialogue Salinger brilliantly exposes Holden's deepest desire and expounds the book's theme. Holden wishes to preserve something of childhood innocence that gets hopelessly lost as we grow into the crazy and phony world of adulthood.




    The theme of lost innocence is deftly explored by Salinger throughout the book. Holden is appalled when he encounters profanity scrawled on the walls of Phoebe's school, a school that he envisions protecting and shielding children from the evils of society.
    When Holden gives his red hunting cap to Phoebe to wear, he gives it to her as a shield, an emblem of the eternal love and protectiveness he feels for her.
    Near the beginning of the book, Holden remembers a girl he once knew, Jane Gallagher, with whom he played checkers. Jane, he remembers, "wouldn't move any of her kings," and action Holden realizes to be a metaphor of her naivete. When Holden hears that his sexually experienced prep school roommate had a date with Jane, he immediately starts a fight with him, symbolically protecting Jane's innocence.
    More sophisticated readers might question the reasons behind Holden's plight. While Holden's feelings are universal, this character does seem to be a rather extreme example. The catalyst for Holden's desires is no doubt the death of his younger brother, Allie, a bright and loving boy who died of leukemia at the age of thirteen. Holden still feels the sting of Allie's death acutely, as well as his own, albeit undeserved, guilt, in being able to do nothing to prevent Allie's suffering.
    The only reminder Holden has of Allie's shining but all-too-short life, is Allie's baseball mitt which is covered with poems Allie read while standing in the outfield. In a particularly poignant moment, Holden tells us that this is the glove he would want to use to catch children when they fall from the cliff of innocence.
    In an interesting, but trademark, Salinger twist, Holden distorts the Robert Burns poem that provides the book's title. Originally, it read, "If a body meet a body, comin' through the rye." Holden distorts the word "meet" into "catch." This is certainly not the first time Holden is guilty of distortion; indeed he is a master at it.
    This distortion, however, shows us how much Allie's death has affected Holden and also how much he fears his own fall from innocence, the theme that threads its way throughout the whole of the book.
    By this amazing book's end, we must reach the conclusion that there are times when we all need a "catcher in the rye." We are, indeed, blessed if we have one.

    0 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 19, 2012

    Rumor

    Anonymous check out my review on the winter wolves

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 17, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 20, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 29 Customer Reviews

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