Blue God: A Life of Krishna

Blue God: A Life of Krishna

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by Ramesh Menon
     
 

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Blue God opens on the battlefield of Kurukshetra, where the Pandava warrior, Arjuna, suffers a crisis of courage. His charioteer, Krishna, expounds the eternal dharma for him. This exposition between two armies is the Bhagavad Gita, the Hindu’s Bible.

BLUE GOD cuts back to Krishna’s birth, and back again to the battlefield, and so

Overview

Blue God opens on the battlefield of Kurukshetra, where the Pandava warrior, Arjuna, suffers a crisis of courage. His charioteer, Krishna, expounds the eternal dharma for him. This exposition between two armies is the Bhagavad Gita, the Hindu’s Bible.

BLUE GOD cuts back to Krishna’s birth, and back again to the battlefield, and so on, chapter by chapter, until both narratives flow together near the book’s end. Never before have Krishna’s sacred Gita and his colorful personality and life been put together in the same book, certainly not in English by a modern novelist for a modern audience.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781469768281
Publisher:
iUniverse, Incorporated
Publication date:
11/20/2000
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
320
File size:
352 KB

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Blue God 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Ramesh Menon does a commendable job throughout this book to show Krishna's biography, while also sewing in lines from the Gita. However, Menon's explanation of Krishna with the Gopis is skewed. Krishna has a spiritual intoxication with these gopis, not sexual dalliances. Krishna(Brahman) is beyond the qualities of humans even while acquiring a human body. In Krishna's previous incarnation as Rama from the Ramayana, it is said that when Rama was in the forest that the rishis looked at him in awe, even though they were jnanis(Knowledge-based)..So, to give the rishis a taste of Vishnu(Incarnation of Rama, Krishna) in the sense of bhakti(Devotion), he brought their souls back not as rishis, but female-gopis to get spiritually intoxicated.. The same rishis from the Ramayana are the gopis during Krishna's time..Menon misses the fact that the soul is sexless..Other than that, Menon does a great job and I would recommend this to readers, however, keep in mind that Menon and many other authors give Krishna the sexual personality that he didn't have.