Blue Shoe

Blue Shoe

3.3 23
by Anne Lamott
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

The New York Times Bestseller from the beloved author of Bird by Bird and Traveling Mercies.

Mattie Ryder is marvelously neurotic, well-intentioned, funny, religious, sarcastic, tender, angry, and broke. Her life at the moment is a wreck: her marriage has failed, her mother is failing, her house is rotting, her waist is expanding, her

Overview

The New York Times Bestseller from the beloved author of Bird by Bird and Traveling Mercies.

Mattie Ryder is marvelously neurotic, well-intentioned, funny, religious, sarcastic, tender, angry, and broke. Her life at the moment is a wreck: her marriage has failed, her mother is failing, her house is rotting, her waist is expanding, her children are misbehaving, and she has a crush on a married man. Then she finds a small rubber blue shoe—nothing more than a gumball trinket—left behind by her father. For Mattie, it becomes a talisman—a chance to recognize the past for what it was, to see the future as she always hoped it could be, and to finally understand her family, herself, and the ever-unfolding mystery of her sweet, sad, and sometimes surprising life.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Messy, brave and weirdly lovable...a substantial literary pleasure.”—New York Times Book Review

"Moving and funny, fetchingly irreverent and soulful, Blue Shoe is an absolute joy."—Chicago Sun-Times

”Everybody loves Anne Lamott...[she] writes with an emotional shorthand that’s instantly decipherable and funny to anyone who’s had children—or parents.”—The Christian Science Monitor

"Irresistible...Lamott has created a work full of shaggy, truthful charm."—San Francisco Chronicle

”Glorious...After reading Blue Shoe, you feel as if you had sat on the kitchen floor and talked with the author late into the night about your mothers, your bodies, your lovers, and God. And that, in a nutshell, is the minor miracle of Lamott’s writing.”—The Atlanta Journal Constitution

”Philosophical, honest, and poignant, Lamott writes about real life and how it goes on, through good and through bad.”—Boston Herald

”The novel’s effect on the reader is profoundly springlike: It is tonic.”—Minneapolis Star Tribune

"Anyone who's ever had a heartache—or a family—will relate to Anne Lamott's poignant novels."—Rosie Magazine

"Blue Shoe is a gift you will want to give yourself."—St. Louis Post-Dispatch

When single mom Mattie Ryder finds a tiny blue rubber shoe in her dead father's car, she decides to investigate how it got there. What should have been a little trinket mystery turns into the key to her relationship with both her parents. A comforting middle-age meditation.
Don McLeese
Lamott's sixth novel shows her protagonist, Mattie Ryder, dealing with the sorts of temptations to which devout Christians rarely admit. Can middle-aged Mattie, a beleaguered mother and daughter, remain an essentially moral person while continuing to sleep with (and wanting to kill) her philandering ex-husband? Should she covet the affections of her handyman friend, who is faithfully, if not happily, married? It's a test of faith for Lamott's characters to find evidence of God's grace amid lives of such messy complexity, but the author shows that it's possible to find Jesus (as she herself has) without losing a sense of humor. Lamott's tragicomic embrace of life's travails and blessings reads like born-again Anne Tyler with a hippie past, depicting a generation that has exchanged the radical rebellions of the '60s for the comforts of lattes and white wine, National Public Radio and diminished expectations. There are a lot of flaws to be found in this book—soap opera complications, politically correct clichés—but there's also a lot of life.
Publishers Weekly
Anyone familiar with Lamott's writing knows her strength is the portrayal of daily life: mothers raising children, lost love, ill parents and more. Mattie, recently separated from her husband, has moved back to the home she grew up in. She decides to renovate the badly run-down house, not anticipating the added complications in her life. Her mother is suffering from dementia, her children are misbehaving and Mattie is still drawn to her estranged husband even though he is involved with a younger woman. This unabridged audio captures the frantic pace of Lamott's work. There are long phone conversations between Mattie and her mother and talks with Angela, Mattie's best friend, who's moving away. Lamott aptly observes that Mattie seems more upset about not seeing her friend than not seeing her husband. Unfortunately, Merlington's quick, flat narration doesn't help bring the novel to life. Some may find themselves overwhelmed by the number of characters while others may struggle to focus on Mattie. While Merlington occasionally changes her voice when other characters are speaking, the overall impression is of a text being read too fast. Based on the Riverhead hardcover (Forecasts, Aug. 26). (Sept.) Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
Library Journal
Lamott's fans will not be disappointed with this new novel, her sixth. Her heroine, Mattie Ryder, has problems-nothing earthshaking, just the painful kind that nibble at her self-esteem. She has left her philandering husband and moved into her mother's ramshackle house; her strong, save-the-world mother is slipping into dementia; her daughter chews on her fingers; her son refuses to do homework; and she is attracted to a married man. In addition, she discovers that she has a half-brother, the result of a union between her late father and the daughter of a family friend. Mattie manages these disturbances in part by being brave and by asking, "What would Jesus do?" Lamott (Operating Instructions) excels in her quirky descriptions, such as Mattie's five-year-old daughter looking like a "secretarial kitten gone punk" or someone's mouth having "scrabble-tile" teeth. While the plot meanders occasionally into implausibility, her humorous yet poignant characters will keep listeners interested. Laural Merlington reads convincingly although problems with the tape quality of the review copy occasionally obscured her voice. Recommended for most popular fiction collections.-Nancy R. Ives, SUNY at Geneseo Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Lamott infuses this peripatetic story of a woman’s struggles after a divorce with the same quirky brand of Christianity she explored in her wildly popular memoir, Traveling Mercies (1999).

When Mattie finally accepts that her marriage to the charming but unfaithful Nicholas is over, she moves her two children, Harry (six) and Ella (two), back into the house where she grew up because it’s free: conveniently, her mother, still intimidatingly energetic and competent at 72, has paid off the mortgage and decamped to an apartment. Over the next four years, Mattie goes through all the familiar rites of divorce: anger, longing, desperation, slow recovery to strength, and new love. Her children bring her solace even as they drive her crazy (Lamott is the master of domestic detail): Ella’s nail-chewing, Harry’s bouts of temper, as well as moments of tenderness are rendered with casual perfection. The description of the failed marriage itself, however, is generic, and Mattie’s sense of blamelessness in its collapse sets up a self-righteous tone not masked by self-deprecating humor, a Lamott trademark. Mattie prays her way out of bad feelings, and her religion weaves its way throughout, helping her cope as complications arise—which they do. She sleeps with her ex even after his girlfriend moves in and has a baby. She finds clues that her lovable father, a lawyer and liberal activist who died 20 years earlier, had a dark side. Her mother’s mind and body begin a slow, painful slide into senescence. Mattie’s dog dies. And then there is Daniel. We know he’ll become Mattie’s soulmate when he can’t bring himself to kill the rats he’s been hired to eradicate from Mattie’s infested house. While Danielresists her attraction because he’s married, she takes him to her church (his wife is a nonbeliever), and they become best friends to a degree that would threaten the most secure spouse.

Lots of charm in the details, not much for momentum.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781573223423
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
09/02/2003
Edition description:
Reissue
Pages:
336
Sales rank:
1,121,978
Product dimensions:
5.62(w) x 10.90(h) x 0.88(d)
Age Range:
18 - 17 Years

Read an Excerpt

BLUE SHOE
by Anne Lamott

 

INTRODUCTION

At the beginning of Blue Shoe, Mattie Ryder thinks that life cannot get any more complicated. She is newly divorced and living with her two children in her childhood home, which is infested with rats and too many unanswered questions from her past. While the rat problem can be cured with an exterminator, coming to terms with her past will require Mattie to unravel her family secrets and learn some painful truths, especially about her father.

The clues to his life are contained in a plastic bag that was recovered from the glove box of his old car. Inside are a paint key from a can of blue paint and a tiny blue rubber shoe. As Mattie comes to know it, the story of her father's world shocks her, but it also explains her mother's erratic behavior and distance while she was growing up.

What she learns will help Mattie come to peace with her own life as she finds love with a man with whom she can have an intimate and honest relationship, and accepts the emotional baggage that she carries as a part of herself instead of a burden.

Blue Shoe is an honest, irreverent and compelling story laced with self-deprecating humor, grace, and wit. As always, Anne Lamott creates characters with whom we can identify, as she explores the depths of human emotion.

 

ABOUT ANNE LAMOTT

Anne Lamott is the author of the national bestsellers Traveling Mercies, Bird by Bird, and Operating Instructions, as well as five novels, including Crooked Little Heart and Rosie. Her column in Salon magazine was voted the Best of the Web by Newsweek magazine, and she is a past recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship.

 

DISCUSSION QUESTIONS

  1. Consider the blue shoe. What does it mean to each person who carries it—Alfred, Mattie, Daniel, Noah, and Ella? Discuss it in reference to what Mattie remembers reading about children of the Holocaust (page 38): "Then a social worker determined that if the children were each given a piece of bread to hold at night, they could fall asleep. This was not bread to eat, there was plenty of that when the children were hungry. No, this piece of bread was just to hold on to, to reassure the children through the night that they were safe now, that there would be bread to eat in the morning."

  2. Isa takes wonderful care of people, especially strangers. She fights for underdogs, champions their causes. Is she trying to help the world in order to compensate for her lack of control in her own home? Why is she such a hero to others, while her daughter feels deprived? Are Mattie's feelings of neglect justified? Do you think Isa was a devoted or neglectful mother to Alfred?

  3. Al says the following about the Ryders: "This is how it always ends up in our family, everyone just going off alone—doing whatever they feel like, and not honoring promises" (page 186). Is Al referring to his father's behavior? What impact did Alfred's behavior have on Mattie and Al as children and on who they are as adults, even though they did not learn the details about his life until they were adults?

  4. Throughout Blue Shoe there are references to light and shadow and what they mean at different times of the year. The light, or its absence, affects Mattie's moods, and she is continually lighting candles or adjusting the light. "Mattie was so aware of the darkness in the fall. She put lights up everywhere, candles, white Christmas tree lights, a string of plastic fish lights that Al gave her. She loved the shorter days, frowning, lowering, Heathcliff days, and she liked the early nights, the wintery rawness in the air" (page 88). Discuss the meaning behind these references to light and shadow, to seasons changing.

  5. Isa lived knowing that her husband loved another woman, who was the same age as her own child. "Isa had known all along, not only that Alfred had girlfriends: Isa had known all along about Abby and Noah, and knew still, somewhere deep inside her brain" (page 194). What effect did her husband's "wandering" have on Isa's life? Do you think his infidelity shaped who she was to Mattie and Al? If so, how?

  6. Why does Mattie continue to have sex with Nicky after their divorce? Does sleeping with him kill her desire to get back together with him, as she suggests (page 59)? Or does she need to fill the holes of her childhood with some form of affection, even if it is the wrong kind? Dr. Nolan tells Mattie that when she feels disgust for herself, she keeps hope alive (page 86). Discuss this in reference to Mattie's relationships with her father, Isa, Nicky, and her children.

  7. Lamott writes a particularly telling line about baggage in people's lives when describing how Mattie wishes William might view her. "She wanted him to see her as someone with just a few pieces of colorful carry-on luggage, instead of multiple body bags requiring special cargo fees and handling" (page134). How does Mattie's attempt to be someone else affect her relationship with William? How does her honesty with Daniel affect their relationship?

  8. Mattie takes great pride in winning Daniel away from Pauline. Pauline's hate letters to Mattie, "gave her a sense of superiority, a sense of having won the guy for once: she was used to being the unsuspecting woman in the dark, or the daughter of the woman in the dark, the woman whom the man could not live without, but whom he didn't pick" (page 260). What does being picked mean to Mattie? Does it make her feel superior to Isa? Is there some vindication here for her own father's lying to her?

  9. Discuss Isa and "Tilly." Why does Isa embrace this woman, who is actually the Yvonne she so hated?

  10. Throughout the book Ella inflicts various pains upon herself, among other things repeatedly chewing on a sore on her wrist (page 81). Her physical pain is evident; discuss her emotional pain, and that of the other characters: Mattie, Harry, Daniel, Pauline, Isa, Noah, and Abby?

  11. Discuss the role of faith in Mattie's life: faith in friends, faith in God, faith in family, faith in herself. Does it bring her the acceptance and the love that she feels are missing in other parts of her life? How is her faith tested, and how rewarded, in the novel?

What People are saying about this

From the Publisher

"Messy, brave and weirdly lovable...a substantial literary pleasure.”—New York Times Book Review

"Moving and funny, fetchingly irreverent and soulful, Blue Shoe is an absolute joy."—Chicago Sun-Times

”Everybody loves Anne Lamott...[she] writes with an emotional shorthand that’s instantly decipherable and funny to anyone who’s had children—or parents.”—The Christian Science Monitor

"Irresistible...Lamott has created a work full of shaggy, truthful charm."—San Francisco Chronicle

”Glorious...After reading Blue Shoe, you feel as if you had sat on the kitchen floor and talked with the author late into the night about your mothers, your bodies, your lovers, and God. And that, in a nutshell, is the minor miracle of Lamott’s writing.”—The Atlanta Journal Constitution

”Philosophical, honest, and poignant, Lamott writes about real life and how it goes on, through good and through bad.”—Boston Herald

”The novel’s effect on the reader is profoundly springlike: It is tonic.”—Minneapolis Star Tribune

"Anyone who's ever had a heartache—or a family—will relate to Anne Lamott's poignant novels."—Rosie Magazine

"Blue Shoe is a gift you will want to give yourself."—St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Meet the Author

Anne Lamott is the author of the New York Times bestsellers Help, Thanks, Wow; Some Assembly Required; Grace (Eventually); Plan B; Traveling Mercies; and Operating Instructions, as well as several novels, including Imperfect Birds, Rosie and Crooked Little Heart. A past recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship and an inductee to the California Hall of Fame, she lives in northern California.

Brief Biography

Hometown:
Fairfax, California
Date of Birth:
1954
Place of Birth:
San Francisco, California
Education:
Attended Goucher College in Maryland before dropping out to write

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Blue Shoe 3.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 23 reviews.
girlfromwvaKY 4 months ago
This is the story of Mattie Ryder. She is funny, full of good intentions, religious, sarcastic, tender, angry, broken. She is a recently divorced mother of 2 young children. When she finds a small rubber blue shoe- "the kind you might get from a gumball machine" -and a few other trinkets that were left years ago in her deceased father's car, she tries to uncover clues to the mystery of their past. She had a messy upbringing, with a brittle mother and a father she thought she knew. Mattie tries to open her heart to love her mother, and she tires to open up to the possibilities of a new romantic love. The premise of the book seemed promising. I have never read anything else by this author to compare it to another work, but i had problems getting through this book. The characters were at times confusing, and the story just seemed to keep expanding into areas one on the other. I had a hard time keeping up when it seemed like it wasn't flowing properly. I won't let it keep me from checking out other books by this author.
Jack96 More than 1 year ago
This is the first Anne Lamott book I have read. My niece loves her and was thrilled to get the book after I read it, but I really didn't identify with any of the characters.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
I am at least a decade behind most readers in discovering Anne Lamott, but she has fast become one of my all-time favorite writers. I admire her brutal honesty about herself (as in the nonfiction Operating Instructions). Reading her has empowered me to be more honest about myself. I also am taken with her casual buddy-buddy approach to her relationship with God. Blue Shoes was the first fiction book I've read by her and I deeply enjoyed it, with just a few reservations. She does write with poetic flair but occasionally seems to be straining to form her images or metaphors. E.g., 'the choir's notes hung in the air above them like fluttering moths.' Eeeew! Also, the pacing was a little off--way too much detail on some things, like the iguana Otis, and then too much was hurried over as the end approached. But her strongest suit is her ability to make people come to life for the reader, including herself, whether it be in her fiction or nonfiction. Her voice is extremely strong--Lamott is in the same room with me when I read her. I think she would be too high-maintenance to have as a friend but I love her as an author!
Guest More than 1 year ago
Anne Lamont is one of my favorite writers. A `slice of life¿ type of writer. `Traveling Mercies¿ was just that ¿ like journal entries pieced together. It was a good book. It took a while for this book, ¿Blue Shoe¿, to keep me engaged, and it was the point where I looked at the pages and said, I have to finish this book so I can move on to another. The plot was not much of a plot. But that was okay ¿ the only problem was when it climaxed with how Mattie finds out about the ¿Blue Shoe.¿ It felt forced and totally unrealistic. Like, come-on, get over with it. Why be so¿ `emo?¿ Or so¿ drama!?! Big deal! But¿ other than that, the cast of characters kept me reading although I had a hard time at first remembering the names of the characters. They weren¿t all visual like they usually are - and Anne usually writes vivid, well developed characters. But to me, I had a hard time keeping them in my head. So I cast the main ones. Mattie Ryder - Michelle Pfeiffer (although I doubt she¿s a size 12 which Mattie is in the book) Isa, Mattie¿s mother ¿ Anne Lamott herself (I don¿t know, she just looks the part) Mattie¿s brother ¿ Mark Rufallo (although he¿s too young) Harry, Mattie¿s son ¿ Angus T. Jones (from Two and Half Men but he¿s too old) Ella, Mattie¿s 2 year old daughter ¿ any cute little girl that bites her nails. Daniel, Mattie¿s love interest ¿ Doug Savant (from Desperate Housewives) Lewis (Isa¿s boyfriend) ¿ Morgan Freeman Yep, that¿s my cast. Anne, call me, lets do the movie! The book, like most of her books, had religious overtones ¿ although this one didn¿t pound you over the head with it. It was just enough to give characters character, and why they make some choices that they make ¿ guilt and all! It was enjoyable to read. It was easy to read. But it was long. It could have been cut by 100 pages. The end was sudden and it makes me wonder, did Anne Lamott just finish the book just to finish it? Or was it purposeful, as if to say, the characters still have a life to live and it doesn¿t just end here. I¿m not so inclined to recommend it as a great book, but it¿s a book you can read in bed while it rains. It¿s soothing, and every once in a while you¿ll pick it up, start where you left off, and follow Mattie like she¿s a friend of yours. If you haven¿t read any Anne Lamott books, then read Bird by Bird above all. It¿s her best!
Guest More than 1 year ago
I listened to this on audio which was the first book I have read/listened to by Anne Lamott. As others have mentioned, there was great development of the characters, with the exception of a bit much with the pets. I did often feel as if some areas were too long. I feel guilty when not finishing a book, so I did complete it (what else to do in the car on the way to/from work?). Maybe I did not enjoy it as much because I have not yet encountered some of the life experiences that Mattie was going through. I was so confused and frustrated at the end as I felt there were so many things unresolved. What happens with Mattie's mother? Her newly-discovered brother? Her mother's wedding to her deceased husband's lover? I found myself on this website looking for the sequel and found there is not one, right?
Guest More than 1 year ago
i loved lamott's traveling mercies and was looking forward to this novel. i find her writing compellingly beautiful and accurate (as it was here). but i found this novel boring, with a severe paucity of plot and over-abundance of characters. i'm all for character development, but i was annoyed by the paragraphs and pages devoted to discussion of mattie's cats, dog, and especially otis, the lizard. i disliked the sometimes sanctimonious religious discussions. i tired of mattie asking god for help and then sleeping with her ex-husband--a married man. i couldn't wait to finish this book--but for all the wrong reasons. it is easily 100 pages too long.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is the first book I've read by Anne Lamott and I thoroughly enjoyed it. I listened to it on audio and it was hilarious. I was laughing out loud driving back & forth to work. I liked it very much and highly recommend it to anyone who appreciates women and humor.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Anne has given us a realistic portrayal of a middle aged white woman going through some drama. Mattie is likeable and the other characters are actively interesting. I didn't like the behavior of her son, but that's just my being a black mother. The story had a calming effect on me, but I was also excited about finding out the situation with her parents. Bottom Line: One to have in your collection.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Readers who complain that Blue Shoe isn't tightly plotted are right. However, Lamott's strength is in revealing characters and illuminating the little epiphanies of life. The kids in this book are wonderful - little persons with a wholeness that few writers manage to capture. The decline of Mattie's mother and her swings from heartbreak to impatience to loving acceptance are poignantly expressed. Anyone who has endured this painful progression into parenting a parent will be comforted by Lamott's honesty. Her theme, I think, is love and forgiveness, that no matter how weak and flawed, we are loved and lovable. I, too, found her sexual relationships too casual. But maybe her point is that we put too much emphasis on sexual morality, which is only one tiny part of human love.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This author was recommended to me and I am thrilled that I chose Blue Shoe as my first book of hers to read. I could totally realate with some of Mattie's hardships and how the blue shoe became her focus to get things straight.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The Blue Shoe is far fetched at times, but interesting, colorfully written and human. The main characters are all flawed and struggling with mid-life changes and the stresses of taking care of the young and the aging while trying to find some time for their own lives. The setting in Northern California is lush and adds to the flavor of how the earth and our homes are connected to our growth or our decay.
Guest More than 1 year ago
1. No discernible plotline. What are we building toward here? If I wanted something to go on and on with no point to it, I have real life. 2. Main character is completely unlikable. Her husband cheats on her, she forgives him. He cheats again, WITH A STUDENT, she forgives him. She finally leaves him, then finds out he's been cheating again. She then continues to sleep with him, even after he remarries and has another baby. She also goes after another woman's husband (successfully, unfortunately). She whines. She cries. She has zero redeeming qualities. How can I care? I was DISAPPOINTED when she got the guy. 3. Aren't 1 and 2 enough? Don't waste your time.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I couldn't get past Chapter 3. Maybe, I'm missing something here, however, the character annoyed me. The characters in this book reminds me of people who use their hardships as an excuse to be weak & whiney. I hope the author has written better books than this. I wish I could whine about wasting money on this book, then again, I'd be no different from the character.
Guest More than 1 year ago
this book was very interesting. i enjoyed reading. I enjoyed reading this so much that my sister and i were fighting for it.
Guest More than 1 year ago
It was hard to get involved with the life of the main character at first, but the more I read the more 'human' she became. By the end of the book I felt like I had a new friend. It was a delightful book about life without the fairy-tale ending, it was just an outcome of the decisions she made during her journey. I can't wait to read another Anne Lamont book!
Guest More than 1 year ago
I've read 71 pages and won't be reading further... the plot is thin and the pace unbearably slow. A depressing book, this is not one I would read as a pick me up. Perhaps it will get better towards the end, but the author has failed to get me that far.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I have been an Anne Lamott fan for a long time, and have read several of her books multiple times just because she's so funny and honest and real. This last work, however, was a disappointment. In my opinion, not her best work- it's a sweet story but no plot to speak of. Difficult at times to stay with the story simply because nothing much ever really happened. Some key characters' actions left unexplained. I recommend her other books of both fiction and non-fiction, which are all superb, over this one.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is simply a book about life's journey and the events and experiences that change us. It's about the choices we make and the consequences we live with. It's about an extremely loveable character, Mattie Ryder, and her rather messed up, gloomy life, through-out which she always seems to maintain a wry sense of humor. Now all in all the story is extremely slow paced, but, it's well-written and there are countless hidden wisdoms for you to discover. A book I recommend to the patient and particular. And if you're looking for a few other great titles, look no further than these, Buckland's Hot List: most creative, The Butterfly: A Fable (Singh); most engaging, The Alchemist (Coelho); most interesting, Life of Pi (Martel); most enlightening, 9-11 (Chomsky); most thrilling, The Lovely Bones: A Novel (Sebold); and finally, the most creative, engaging, interesting, enlightening and thrilling book of all, The Little Prince (Saint-Exupery). These are the books I'd recommend to my family, friends, students, and wife. There are many more, trust me, but these are the first that come to mind (for having left an impact slight or proud as it may be). If you have any questions, queries, or comments, or maybe even a title you think I should add to my list, please feel free to e-mail me. I'm always open to a good recommendation. Thanks for reading my brief but hopefully helpful review. Happy reading. Donald S. Buckland.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I just read BLUE SHOE by Annie Lamott and let me tell you, it is a MUST READ. It was so very good. I would know Mattie on the street and for sure, Pauline. I would know the kids, Abby and her son, Mattie's father and certainly, Isa. I would know Mattie's new love and her old love, easily. I loved the story and I understand all of Mattie's struggles having been there so many times myself. I have always loved Ms. Lamott's books - all of them - but especially, BIRD BY BIRD. So if I see a book and it has her name on it, I know that I have to read it because her work is powerful and real.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I was hesitant to begin this book, due to the description on the book jacket. The story sounded trite. Once I began reading, it was difficult to stop. The writing was superb, and definitely a story I could relate to. Looking forward to reading her other works.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I enjoyed this book and ANYONE who has ever been divorced or has cared for aging parents would totally appreciate the main character's situation. The end was a bit predictable, but it's nice to see some people's children and parents not be perfect. Book makes you see that you never really stop "growing up."