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Blue Öyster Cult [Bonus Tracks]
     

Blue Öyster Cult [Bonus Tracks]

5.0 1
by Blue Öyster Cult
 

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Blue Öyster Cult's debut album provided the missing link between the heavy, blues-based rock of the late '60s and the bombastic heavy metal of the '70s and beyond. You could hear major influences like Steppenwolf, with its melodic, aggressive rock, the Rolling Stones (post-1965), and even boogie bands

Overview

Blue Öyster Cult's debut album provided the missing link between the heavy, blues-based rock of the late '60s and the bombastic heavy metal of the '70s and beyond. You could hear major influences like Steppenwolf, with its melodic, aggressive rock, the Rolling Stones (post-1965), and even boogie bands like Canned Heat in their sound. But BÖC streamlined the approach, picked up the tempo, overlaid the guitars, brought the rhythm section up in the mix, and de-emphasized the blues, giving the music a machinelike propulsion. Manager/co-producer Sandy Pearlman (who co-wrote five songs) and lyricist Richard Meltzer (who co-wrote two) may have seen the group as a vehicle for their "clever" (in fact, pretentious) lyrics, but in fact lead vocalist Eric Bloom was the weakest element in the band, and you couldn't make out much of what he had to say over guitarist Donald "Buck Dharma" Roeser's furious power chording. What you could seemed to express some sort of mythology -- or demonology; future metal bands would fill their songs with just such half-baked philosophies. Blue Öyster Cult">{|Blue Öyster Cult was not quite full-fledged heavy metal: the production was too compressed, the playing too light and energetic. But it was the sound of something new and different in the world of hard rock. [The 2001 CD reissue on Columbia/Legacy adds four previously unreleased demos from 1969, when they were known as Soft White Underbelly, including a cover of {|Bobby Freeman">Blue Öyster Cult">Blue Öyster Cult">{|Blue Öyster Cult was not quite full-fledged heavy metal: the production was too compressed, the playing too light and energetic. But it was the sound of something new and different in the world of hard rock. [The 2001 CD reissue on Columbia/Legacy adds four previously unreleased demos from 1969, when they were known as Soft White Underbelly, including a cover of {|Bobby Freeman's "Betty Lou's Got a New Pair of Shoes."]

Product Details

Release Date:
02/01/2008
Label:
Sbme Special Mkts.
UPC:
0886972388328
catalogNumber:
723883
Rank:
12192

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Blue Öyster Cult   Primary Artist
Eric Bloom   Guitar,Electric Guitar,Keyboards,Vocals
Albert Bouchard   Guitar,Harmonica,Drums,Vocals
Joe Bouchard   Bass,Guitar,Piano,Vocals
Allen Lanier   Bass,Guitar,Rhythm Guitar,Keyboards,Vocals
Donald Roeser   Synthesizer,Guitar,Keyboards,Vocals

Technical Credits

Bruce Dickinson   Reissue Producer
Lenny Kaye   Liner Notes
Murray Krugman   Producer
David Lucas   Producer,Engineer
Mitchell Parish   Composer
Sandy Pearlman   Producer
Bill Robertson   Engineer
Frank Signorelli   Composer
Matty Malneck   Composer
Bob Devere   Producer
Jay Lee   Producer
Emily Goldberg   Packaging Manager

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Blue Öyster Cult 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
B.O.C. comes meandering out of the gates at a fairly low rumble here, sounding like some strange cross of Doobie Brothers and Sabbath. Their penchant for the bizarre is already on display, lyrics involving everything from a drug deal gone wrong ('Then Came the Last Days of May') to a romp through Celtic faery land ('Before the Kiss. A Redcap'). If you are looking for hi-fidelity soundscapes, this is not going to be your cup of tea. What we get in total is a form of low-key cruising music, murkily recorded, heavy on the reverb effects, analog all the way. Roeser and Bloom manage to shine in spite of the weak recording, pulling off some fairly blazing leads. The drums are barely present, buried in the background mix, Bouchard sitting back in Ringo-land, hardly touching his kit. What this album does have to offer, in spades, is a highly melodic, very weird trip through a creepy, late-psychedlic landscape. Extended jams abound in this truly guitar-driven album. B.O.C. gives us dark melodies, grim musings touched with a satirical hand--in short, a first take on what would later become a truly masterful hard rock outfit. If you are a fan of B.O.C., by all means pick this up. It rewards after repeated listens, sort of oozing its way into the back of your brain and shaking hands with your subconscious. Strange dreams to come...