The Blue Zones: Lessons for Living Longer From the People Who've Lived the Longest

The Blue Zones: Lessons for Living Longer From the People Who've Lived the Longest

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by Dan Buettner
     
 

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Award-winning author and researcher Dan Buettner has traveled the world to meet the planet’s longest-lived people, and learned nine powerful yet simple lessons that could put you on the path to longer life. Where did he find them? In the Blue Zones. Blue Zones are communities where common elements of lifestyle, diet and outlook have led to an amazing quantity

Overview

Award-winning author and researcher Dan Buettner has traveled the world to meet the planet’s longest-lived people, and learned nine powerful yet simple lessons that could put you on the path to longer life. Where did he find them? In the Blue Zones. Blue Zones are communities where common elements of lifestyle, diet and outlook have led to an amazing quantity – and quality – of life. Dan Buettner shares the secrets from four of the world’s Blue Zones. Buettner’s extensive study uncovers how these people manage to live longer and better, but found in the everyday things they do: the food they eat, the company they keep, and their very perspectives on life. In The Blue Zones, they become yours to follow for life!

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"...one of the most hopeful and motivating quality-of-life audio lessons available."
- AudioFile Magazine

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781611203059
Publisher:
Dreamscape Media
Publication date:
10/19/2010
Edition description:
Unabridged
Sales rank:
1,319,093
Product dimensions:
4.90(w) x 5.60(h) x 0.40(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

Meet the Author

Dan Buettner is an internationally recognized researcher, explorer, and author. He founded Blue Zones™ to research and publicize the world’s best practices in health, longevity, and happiness. A pioneer in exploration and education, he has traveled the world to answer some of science’s biggest questions. Dan’s National Geographic cover story on Blue Zones was one of the top-selling covers in the magazine’s history, and the book hit The New York Times bestseller list.

READER BIO

Michael McConnohie has done extensive voice work for countless cartoons, video games, commercials, and audiobooks.  He is the President of the Nevada-based Voxworks voice-acting corporation.  Michael’s audiobook credits include narrating Fritjof Capra’s The Tao of Physics, Stuart M. Kaminsky’s Earphones Award-winning Always Say Goodbye, Noah Boyd’s The Bricklayer, and C. David Heyman’s Liz: An Intimate Biography of Elizabeth Taylor.

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Blue Zones 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 33 reviews.
dido_me More than 1 year ago
I really enjoyed reading "The Blue Zones". For me it was educational and intriging. It was hard to put down and I looked forward to hopping back into bed and finding out how the Costa Ricans maintained longevity. I have no significant analytical evaluation to provide. I simply enjoyed the reading. I did try the wine that the Sardinians drank, Cannonau was the name. It was not my favorite. It was heavy, rich and dry. It gave me what I call the "shake down", similar to what a dog does when he gets out of the bath to shake off the water but without the intensity. A little was all I could handle. I will however recommend Ecco Domani Chianti wine. It tastes good and goes down light and smooth. It goes well with the reading. Buy the book, you will see!
BoulderQuince More than 1 year ago
After hearing an interview with the author on National Public Radio, I was intrigued enough to go out and buy a copy of The Blue Zones. The book is well written and organized so I was engaged as soon as I started reading. The story of each community and the characters highlighted are fascinating I appreciated the credibility and authenticity of the research collected, over seven years, by a team of scientists and physicians funded by National Geographic. My family happened to be on vacation in Costa Rica when I gave the book to my husband to read. When he was done he announced he was ready to eat a plant based, unrefined diet with fish as an occasional condiment. If you're looking for a way to live a long life, content and disease free, then Blue Zones is good place to start.
Ausonius More than 1 year ago
Barbagia, a part of Northwest Sardinia's Ogliastra district, begets contented, admired 100-year olds as few other places on Earth. There are several speculative reasons why. The landscape is steep and not ultra-productive. What was the obvious profession? Shepherding. "The work was neither stressful nor strenuous, but it did require miles and miles of walking a day. " (p. 60) Today's centenarian shepherds suffer fewer than half the fractures of their age mates in other parts of the island. Application to 21st Century Americans who want to live longer? "Walking five miles a day or more pdrovides the type of low-intensity exercise that yields all the cardiovascular benefits you might expect, but it also has a positive effect on muscles and bones -- without the joint-pounding damage caused by running marathons or triathlons." (p. 60) So, Americans, walk like a Sardinian shepherd. Burn 490 calories per hour. Forget the sheep. Forget any loneliness of the long distance runner. Adapt the ideas you for longevity from Sardinia. These also include drinking two liters (!) a day of Sardinia's famous dry red wine called Cannonau. *** Similar tales of long, happy living are told by author Dan Buettner of rare centenarian rich "blue zones" in Costa Rica, Okinawa and Loma Linda, California (where Seventh-day Adventists cluster around their famous university and health research center). Buettner tells their stories in THE BLUE ZONES: LESSONS FOR LIVING LONGER FROM THE PEOPLE WHO'VE LIVED THE LONGEST (2008). For seven years National Geographic magazine sponsored Buettner and various cameramen and scientific specialists he assembled as they studied latter-day fountains if not of eternal youth, at least of graceful, happy, low-stress aging. *** Some oldsters surveyed drank goat milk, others wine. Some were shepherds. Some were gardeners. Some lived under the same roof or close to four more generations of descendants. Some lived in an Adventist retirement community replete with family-oriented Sabbaths, weights and stationary exercise bikes. All had a zest for living, lived to help others, and not just their great grandchildren. From their widely scattered lives and different life styles, Dan Buettner in THE BLUE ZONES draws nine general cross-cultural conclusions on how to live long, healthy lives. You are urged to pick the easiest ones first and spend seven to 12 weeks forming the new habits that make each one effective. Practices commended range from eating more nuts, drinking a glass or two of red wine daily, and going to church at least once a month, through writing your own personal mission statement, to cutting back on eating meat. *** The book is an easy, fairly convincing read. Its one glaring blunder is absence of maps. The author describes four widely separated areas of the world. He brings their denizens to three-dimensional life through words and black and white photos. He strews informational side bars throughout the book. He devotes a page to "Illustration Credits." Yet he can't make room for four maps! The book is inspirational and will no doubt be followed by more books by Buetner or others discovering, probing and drawing applications from more and more Blue Zones on our globe. Buettner's book is a good first word. I predict, however, that it will soon be eclipsed by others still to come and will not be a permanent addition to many libraries. -OOO-
wilderness_to_city More than 1 year ago
Recently, while attending a conference in San Diego, I had the opportunity to hear Dan Buettner speak regarding his book, Blue Zones. His presentation was inspiring and affirming. When I returned home I ran right out to get the book. Buettner tells a great story about his travels as part of a National Geographic team researching areas around the globe that have in them an unusually high number of people over 100 years of age. Their quest? To see if there are any commonalities between the places visited that could suggest a recipe for living a long, healthy and happy life. Blue Zones has a great narrative quality to it, as well as practical advice for improving quality of life and longevity. Interviews with centenarians, people over 100 years of age, are inspiring to say the least. There is also culture and history to be enjoyed in Blue Zones, as Buettner visits places like Sardinia, Costa Rica, Okinawa and Southern California. It's tough to put it down; but giving oneself time to reflect will make it all the more meaningful and powerful.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
After having a kidney and tumor removed because of cancer I wanted to change a lot in my life. Blue Zone gave me a blue print on the changes in my life that needed to be made. I loved it, very inspiring.
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I had read all the National Geographic research this originally was in. It is so interesting. I made a book of the Nat.Geo. pages from two different issues and a Time Mag. presentatin. Now it is altogether in one book. Can hardlyh wait to begin reading this book with everything in one volume. Thank you for the prompt filling of my order.
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Ahimsa76 More than 1 year ago
The reasearch and culurally diverse study put into this book...make it a must read for personal, community, and political planners. Chapter summaries are great for use in memory refreshment and integration.
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