Bluegrass Melodies

Bluegrass Melodies

5.0 2
by Bobby Osborne
     
 
Bobby Osborne is one of a handful of first generation bluegrass pioneers still practicing his craft. Originally known for his work with his brother Sonny, Bobby has launched his solo career after six decades in the music business. Osborne has been best known for his high, distinct tenor which he brought to bear on classics like "Rocky Top" and

Overview

Bobby Osborne is one of a handful of first generation bluegrass pioneers still practicing his craft. Originally known for his work with his brother Sonny, Bobby has launched his solo career after six decades in the music business. Osborne has been best known for his high, distinct tenor which he brought to bear on classics like "Rocky Top" and "Ruby (Are You Mad)." Over the years, the Osborne Brothers abandoned their more experimental streak for a traditional, acoustic-based bluegrass, and Bluegrass Melodies follows suit. Osborne is joined by the Rocky Top X-Press, featuring banjoist Dana Cupp, bassist Daryl Mosley, guitarist Bobby Osborne, Jr. (son), fiddler Glen Duncan, and dobroist Matt Despain. Osborne's in good voice and excels on numbers like the title cut. There are also fine versions of "Thank God I'm a Country Boy" and "Music Makin' Man." Bluegrass Melodies is a solid release and should please longtime fans, though the proceedings rarely inject the kind of high-octane energy and high-flying vocals that once left the Osborne Brothers' fans dumb struck (this statement would probably be equally true of the most recent Osborne Brothers' releases). Still, Osborne remains a distinctive vocalist, easily separating himself from an ever growing field of contemporary bluegrass bands.

Product Details

Release Date:
07/10/2007
Label:
Rounder / Umgd
UPC:
0011661058224
catalogNumber:
610582
Rank:
220406

Related Subjects

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Bobby Osborne   Primary Artist,Mandolin,Vocals,Tenor (Vocal)
Rhonda Vincent   Vocals,Tenor (Vocal)
Glen Duncan   Acoustic Guitar,Fiddle,Baritone (Vocal),Tenor (Vocal)
Daryl Mosley   Tenor (Vocal),Acoustic Bass
Matt DeSpain   Dobro,Baritone (Vocal)
Bobby Osborne   Acoustic Guitar,Baritone (Vocal),Acoustic Bass

Technical Credits

Marty Stuart   Liner Notes
Buck Owens   Composer
Glen Duncan   Composer,Producer,Liner Notes
Felice Bryant   Composer
Vince Gill   Composer
Bobby Osborne   Composer
John Sommers   Composer
Darrell Statler   Composer
Jerry Salley   Composer
Ben Surratt   Engineer

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Bluegrass Melodies 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Playing Time – 39:18 About a year after his “Try a Little Kindness” debut on the Rounder Records, Bobby Osborne’s second release on that label further indicates that the 75-year-old pioneer’s bluegrass is higher and lonesomer than ever. At age 18, Bobby first learned about being forlorn and alone when he started his career in 1949 with banjo player Larry Richardson, Charlie and Ray Cline in The Lonesome Pine Fiddlers. Today, his soaring vocals still exude pathos in songs like an original “Color Me Lonely,” Glen Duncan and Jerry Salley’s “Under A Lonesome Moon,” and Carter Stanley’s “Lonesome River” that is given a slight interpretive twist to impart his own personalized stamp. When Bobby tenderly sings of suffering, we’re immediately sympathetic. The “Music Makin’ Man” also still incorporates plenty of country charm into his “Bluegrass Melodies.” While some of his mandolin breaks may not come off as cleanly and nimble-fingered as in younger days, a special treat is his own instrumental “Lucky Lane Shuffle,” a rag that recalls the influence of early southern music on the genre. Joining Osborne, his band The Rocky Top X-Press includes Dana Cupp (banjo), Daryl Mosley (bass), Bobby Osborne Jr. (rhythm guitar), and Matt Despain (Dobro). Rhonda Vincent’s defining vocals appear in the poignant closer written by Vince Gill, “Go Rest High On That Mountain.” Glen Duncan’s superb fiddling (often twinned) appears on all twelve tracks, and he supercharges the interesting, varied and poised material in the well-balanced set. Bobby Osborne’s stability and perseverance are the epitome of bluegrass strength and equilibrium. While there are many varieties of bluegrass music, Bobby Osborne’s cultivates all the elements of polished radio-friendly fare that is still full of sorrow, risk, joy and reverence. (Joe Ross, staff writer, Bluegrass Now)
Guest More than 1 year ago
Playing Time – 39:18 -- About a year after his “Try a Little Kindness” debut on the Rounder Records, Bobby Osborne’s second release on that label further indicates that the 75-year-old pioneer’s bluegrass is higher and lonesomer than ever. At age 18, Bobby first learned about being forlorn and alone when he started his career in 1949 with banjo player Larry Richardson, Charlie and Ray Cline in The Lonesome Pine Fiddlers. Today, his soaring vocals still exude pathos in songs like an original “Color Me Lonely,” Glen Duncan and Jerry Salley’s “Under A Lonesome Moon,” and Carter Stanley’s “Lonesome River” that is given a slight interpretive twist to impart his own personalized stamp. When Bobby tenderly sings of suffering, we’re immediately sympathetic. The “Music Makin’ Man” also still incorporates plenty of country charm into his “Bluegrass Melodies.” While some of his mandolin breaks may not come off as cleanly nimble-fingered as in younger days, a special treat is his own instrumental “Lucky Lane Shuffle,” a rag that recalls the influence of early southern music on the genre. Joining Osborne, his band The Rocky Top X-Press includes Dana Cupp (banjo), Daryl Mosley (bass), Bobby Osborne Jr. (rhythm guitar), and Matt Despain (Dobro). Rhonda Vincent’s defining vocals appear in the poignant closer written by Vince Gill, “Go Rest High On That Mountain.” Glen Duncan’s superb fiddling (often twinned) appears on all twelve tracks, and he supercharges the interesting, varied and poised material in the well-balanced set. Bobby Osborne’s stability and perseverance are the epitome of bluegrass strength and equilibrium. While there are many varieties of bluegrass music, Bobby Osborne’s cultivates all the elements of polished radio-friendly fare that is still full of sorrow, risk, joy and reverence. (Joe Ross, staff writer, Bluegrass Now)