Blues Belles with Attitude! From the Vaults of Modern Records of Hollywood

Blues Belles with Attitude! From the Vaults of Modern Records of Hollywood

     
 

Those vaults of Modern Records contain an enormous amount of recordings of R&B from the 1940s and 1950s, which have spawned a lengthy series of CD reissues on Ace. This 28-track collection focuses on, as you can probably guess from the title, women blues and R&B singers from the mid-'40s to the mid-'50s. A couple of these performers did make a mark beyond the…  See more details below

Overview

Those vaults of Modern Records contain an enormous amount of recordings of R&B from the 1940s and 1950s, which have spawned a lengthy series of CD reissues on Ace. This 28-track collection focuses on, as you can probably guess from the title, women blues and R&B singers from the mid-'40s to the mid-'50s. A couple of these performers did make a mark beyond the corridors of collector-dom, those being Helen Humes and, in what are probably the sides of most significant interest to aficionados, previously unreleased alternate takes of Esther Phillips' first two 78s (when she was billed as Esther Jones with the Johnny Otis Orchestra). Otherwise, it's a mixture of pretty obscure singles by pretty obscure singers, along with a good number of previously unreleased tracks, some of whose origins are so murky that they're simply billed to "Unknown." Some very notable figures of the Los Angeles postwar R&B scene -- Otis, Howard McGhee, Maxwell Davis, and Johnny Moore -- lead some of the backup bands. In all, though, it's one of Ace's many Modern various-artists compilations whose appeal is almost exclusively for the early R&B/jump blues (and occasional boogie) specialist, mixing some swaggering earthy performances with more refined, urbane, less uptempo ones. It's not often that a tune or vocal jumps out as something special; in the main it features serviceable songs in the style with spirited execution where the attitude indeed outpaces the material. "Lonely Girl" is a standout not so much for singer Cordella DeMilo as Johnny Watson, who contributes some great hard electric blues guitar riffs that far outshine everything else going on in the track. As an odd footnote, Del Graham, who does one of the smoothest numbers with the ballad "Mr. T 99," is the mother of none other than funk star Larry Graham.

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Product Details

Release Date:
08/11/2009
Label:
Ace Records Uk
UPC:
0029667037624
catalogNumber:
1234
Rank:
167214

Related Subjects

Tracks

  1. Ain't Gonna Hush  - Cordella DeMilo
  2. Blue and Lonesome  - Jay Frank
  3. Mr. T 99  -  Johnny Ingram & His Rhythm Czars
  4. Two Years of Torture  - Edna Broughton
  5. Lonely Girl  - Cordella DeMilo
  6. Be Bop Boogie  - Effie Smith
  7. Hey, Hey, Baby  - Helen Humes
  8. Hambone Blues  - Edna Broughton
  9. Nightmare Blues  - Mari Jones
  10. Gee I'm Lonesome  -  Howard McGhee & His Orchestra
  11. I Gotta Guy  -  Johnny Otis & His Orchestra
  12. Hey Little Boy
  13. Great to Be Rich  - Effie Smith
  14. Georgia Brown Blues  - Edna Broughton
  15. Daddy, Somebody's Got to Go  - Pearl Traylor
  16. I Ain't in the Mood  - Helen Humes
  17. I'm Tellin' You Baby  -  Nic-Nacs
  18. That's Fat Jack  - Jimmie Lee
  19. 24 Hours a Day
  20. Down in Texas  -  Johnny Moore's Three Blazers
  21. Found Me a Sugar Daddy  -  Nic-Nacs
  22. Too Many Women  - Edna Broughton
  23. Play Boy Blues  -  Howard McGhee & His Orchestra
  24. Mean Ole Gal  -  Johnny Otis Orchestra
  25. Good for Nothin' Man  - Mickey Champion
  26. Be My Lovey Dovey
  27. The Pick-Up
  28. Vivianne's Boogie  - Vivian Green

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