Blues for a Rotten Afternoon

Blues for a Rotten Afternoon

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From the "ain't nothin' more authentic" dirge of Luther "Guitar Jr." Johnson's "So Mean to Me" to the barrelhouse cluckin' of Marty Grebb's "Hen House," this blatant copy of Joel Dorn's Jazz For- series combines true tales of loss with rather peppy pleas for love, wealth, and the other anti-ingredients of

Overview

From the "ain't nothin' more authentic" dirge of Luther "Guitar Jr." Johnson's "So Mean to Me" to the barrelhouse cluckin' of Marty Grebb's "Hen House," this blatant copy of Joel Dorn's Jazz For- series combines true tales of loss with rather peppy pleas for love, wealth, and the other anti-ingredients of the blues. In true blues, everything gets lost, prompting Junior Wells to ask the somewhat musical question "Why Are People Like That" (a bluesy companion to Dylan's "Rainy Day Women"). While John Primer's "Brutal Hearted Woman" might be the culprit, Son Seals tells listeners that it can be the love itself that has the breakdown. In those cases where the problem is not your woman (which is actually the desired aim in Sugar Ray Norcia's blues-hearted "Life Will Be Better"), another common culprit is money (which is the titular theme of Debbie Davies' contribution). In the modern blues age, that can also mean a case of "Credit Card Blues," which Terry Evans diagnoses with insightful and cautionary humor. In the worst case scenario, love and money can combine for even more tragic results, as in Sam Lay's "Somebody's Gotta Do It." Though you may not want to admit it, there are times when the loss is your own darn fault, as in Kenny Neal's Cocker-esque "Killed the Goose That Laid the Golden Egg." Other times, the loss is not intentional, but still ends up being your fault, as in Lady Bianca's Motown-worthy heart-burner "How Do I Tell My Little Sister?" No matter what causes the pain, sometimes the only answer seems to be diving into a sea of drink, as Willie Dixon prepares to do in "If the Sea Was Whiskey." Other times, there isn't anything to do but sing the blues. Though the repertoire and cast of characters on this label sampler is impressive, nobody puts it together better than Maria Muldaur, whose aching "Misery and the Blues" sums it all up in more than name.

Product Details

Release Date:
07/25/2000
Label:
Telarc
UPC:
0089408350825
catalogNumber:
83508
Rank:
235137

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Larry McCray   Guitar
Charlie Musselwhite   Harmonica
Kenny Neal   Guitar,Harmonica,Vocals,Background Vocals
Son Seals   Track Performer
Taj Mahal   Guitar,Vocals
Junior Wells   Harmonica,Vocals,Track Performer
Ry Cooder   Guitar
Kooper   Hammond Organ
Maria Muldaur   Vocals
Brown   Bass
Sam Lay   Drums,Vocals
Mike Vernon   Percussion
Luther "Guitar Junior" Johnson   Rhythm Guitar,Leader,Vocals
John Primer   Guitar,Vocals
Sonny Landreth   Slide Guitar,Soloist
Jerry Portnoy   Harmonica
Debbie Davies   Guitar,Vocals,Soloist
Calvin "Fuzz" Jones   Bass
Gil Bernal   Tenor Saxophone
Lady Bianca   Piano,Vocals
Brian Bisesi   Rhythm Guitar
Tony Braunagel   Drums
Larry Burton   Guitar
James Calire   Tenor Saxophone
Danny Caron   Guitar
Jon Cleary   Piano
Ola Dixon   Drums
Herman V. Ernest   Drums
Terry Evans   Vocals
Louis Fasman   Trumpet
Anthony Geraci   Organ,Piano
Joe Goldmark   Steel Guitar
Marty Grebb   Piano,Baritone Saxophone,Tenor Saxophone,Vocals
Fred James   Rhythm Guitar
Bob Kommersmith   Bass
Randy Lee Lippincott   Bass
Carl Lockett   Acoustic Guitar,Electric Guitar
Pauline Lozana   Background Vocals
Arno Lucas   Percussion
Melecio Magdaluyo   Alto Saxophone,Tenor Saxophone
David Maxwell   Piano
Reggie McBride   Bass
Steve McCray   Drums
Michael Merritt   Bass
Nick Milo   Synthesizer
Noel Neal   Bass
Sugar Ray Norcia   Track Performer
Mark Pender   Trumpet
Kevin Porter   Trombone,Tuba
Dan Rabinovitz   Trumpet
Richie Rosenberg   Baritone Saxophone
Tony Saunders   Bass
Ken Saydak   Organ,Piano
Matthew Skoller   Harmonica
Willie "Big Eyes" Smith   Drums
Rev. Ron Stallings   Tenor Saxophone
Greg "Fingers" Taylor   Harmonica
Derek Trucks   Slide Guitar,Soloist
Wayne Wallace   Trombone
Jimmy Vivino   Acoustic Guitar,Rhythm Guitar
Fred Walcott   Percussion
Willie Green   Background Vocals
Jerry Vivino   Tenor Saxophone
Ray Williams   Background Vocals
Jeff Alviani   Keyboards
Lynwood Cooke   Saxophone
Scott Healy   Keyboards
Dave Rokeach   Drums
James Wormworth   Drums
Bob Sunda   Electric Bass
Mario Calire   Drums
Dave Matthews   Piano,Hammond Organ
Kennard Johnson   Drums
Kenny Dew   Bass
Celia Ann Price   Organ,Piano

Technical Credits

Johnny Shines   Composer
Robert Woods   Executive Producer
Anilda Carrasquillo   Art Direction,Cover Design
Mykel Kane   Cover Photo
Guidry   Composer

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Blues for a Rotten Afternoon 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
hrhsmith1 More than 1 year ago
I first purchased this CD after looking at the cover. Yes, I am a male chauvinist. After playing this CD the first time, it immediately became a CD I have played a lot. If you are having a bad day, these tunes will either make you feel better or make you feel better!!! Great music by amazing blues musicians. I can't recommend this CD highly enough! Buy it, you clod! What are you waiting for?