Blur: The Speed of Change in the Connected Economy

Blur: The Speed of Change in the Connected Economy

by Stan Davis, Christopher Meyer
     
 

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This is a critique of the way in which traditional boundaries between product and service, capital and people, and buyer and seller are now blurred. It contends that this blurring between business areas offers fresh challenges that should help companies thrive in a changing environment.

Overview

This is a critique of the way in which traditional boundaries between product and service, capital and people, and buyer and seller are now blurred. It contends that this blurring between business areas offers fresh challenges that should help companies thrive in a changing environment.

Editorial Reviews

The Barnes & Noble Review
Speed. Intangibles. Connectivity. As these three forces converge, every dimension of business behavior is being challenged to its core. If you think that business can be sustained by the old rules of mass production, segmented pricing, and stable organizations, you need to think again.

Welcome to the new economy, in which the rate of change is so fast, it's only a blur; in which the clear lines distinguishing buyer from seller, product from service, employee from entrepreneur are disappearing. To profit from these revolutionary patterns of business, you need a dynamic guide to the new economy. You need Blur.

In this groundbreaking book, Stan Davis and Christopher Meyer deliver more than a guided tour of these momentous shifts. They offer readers a working model to illustrate and help them benefit from the new rules of the connected economy, in which advantage is temporary and nothing is fixed in time or space. Showcasing the practices of dozens of enterprises exploring the new frontiers of business, from online merchants to DreamWorks SKG to MBNA America, Davis and Meyer build a new framework for delivering and capturing value, evaluating success, developing strategy, and managing organizations in an economic world no longer regulated by static measures of supply and demand.

Blur provides a lens for bringing into focus the emerging economic landscape — a world in which change is constant; knowledge and imagination are more valuable than physical capital; products and services are blended as "offers"; transactions give way to "exchanges"; and physical marketstakeon the characteristics of financial markets. This world rewards those who buck convention, like MCI, which has reorganized every six months to release creativity, or David Bowie, who has sold options on his future earnings as an artist. Adaptability is paramount, as more companies build permeable networks of business relationships with suppliers, distributors, employees, and even competitors, and individuals become "free agents," contracting their services to the highest bidders.

Blur challenges you to question every assumption you hold about how business is conducted and encourages you to experiment at the edges of business. Blur outlines nothing less than a revolution in business and consumer culture. Will you watch on the sidelines as the innovators overtake you, or are you ready to start discovering and playing by the rules of Blur?

Kirkus Reviews
A feel-good guide to doing business in the post-industrial age. A new economy is emerging, say the authors, every bit as world-changing as that created by the Industrial Revolution, and they call this new economy BLUR. Itþs characterized by Speed, Intangibles, and Connectivity. Speed is the shrinkage of time through near-instantaneous communication and computation. Connectivity is the shrinkage of space with the advent of the Web, E-mail, beepers, and other media of communication. Intangibles are values without mass, most importantly knowledge and its mobility, made possible through Speed and Connectivity. Throw away your business economic texts, say Davis and Meyerþthe world of BLUR makes them obsolete. Companies prosper by not owning vast amounts of productive capacity. Nike, for instance, is a sort of Seinfeld of the business world, making nothing, but prospers by selling image and design. In the world of BLUR, work and home become one; consumers sell and sellers buy; workers become entrepreneurs selling their skills temporarily to the highest bidder and then moving on; competitors cooperate. The only certainty is uncertainty, but if economies, companies, and individuals embrace this uncertainty, and think creatively about and within it, they will prosper. The authors are on to something here; they've seemingly caught the Zeitgeist. Yet in their enthusiasm they may overstate just how BLURred (as they say) the economy actually is. Yes, Nike sells image, but somebody is making those expensive sneakers, and they are not to be heard from here. Consumers sell information back to producers, which they in turn use to improve what they sell, but does that fundamentally changepatterns of concentrated economic control? And while we can buy groceries over the Internet, how many people do? (The book is devoid of statistical or quantitative analysis.) As a guide to surviving in the new business world, this is most intriguing and entertaining. As a careful analysis of what's really going on, it falls short. (illustrations, not seen)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781900961714
Publisher:
Capstone Publishing Company
Publication date:
03/31/1998
Pages:
265

Meet the Author

Stan Davis, a well-known visionary business thinker, is the author of eight influential books, including the bestselling Future Perfect, recipient of Tom Peters’ “Book of the Decade” Award. Formerly on the faculty of Harvard Business School, Columbia University, and Boston University, he’s now an independent consultant and research fellow at Ernst & Young’s Center for Business Innovation in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Christopher Meyer, a leading business consultant and lecturer, is director of Ernst and Young’s Center for Business Innovation. With over twenty years’ experience in general management and economic consulting, he is an authority on the evolution of the information economy and its impact on business.

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