The Bodhisattva's Brain: Buddhism Naturalized [NOOK Book]

Overview


If we are material beings living in a material world -- and all the scientific evidence suggests that we are -- then we must find existential meaning, if there is such a thing, in this physical world. We must cast our lot with the natural rather than the supernatural. Many Westerners with spiritual (but not religious) inclinations are attracted to Buddhism -- almost as a kind of moral-mental hygiene. But, as Owen Flanagan points out in The Bodhisattva's Brain, Buddhism is hardly naturalistic. In The ...
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The Bodhisattva's Brain: Buddhism Naturalized

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Overview


If we are material beings living in a material world -- and all the scientific evidence suggests that we are -- then we must find existential meaning, if there is such a thing, in this physical world. We must cast our lot with the natural rather than the supernatural. Many Westerners with spiritual (but not religious) inclinations are attracted to Buddhism -- almost as a kind of moral-mental hygiene. But, as Owen Flanagan points out in The Bodhisattva's Brain, Buddhism is hardly naturalistic. In The Bodhisattva's Brain, Flanagan argues that it is possible to discover in Buddhism a rich, empirically responsible philosophy that could point us to one path of human flourishing. Some claim that neuroscience is in the process of validating Buddhism empirically, but Flanagan's naturalized Buddhism does not reduce itself to a brain scan showing happiness patterns. "Buddhism naturalized," as Flanagan constructs it, offers instead a fully naturalistic and comprehensive philosophy, compatible with the rest of knowledge -- a way of conceiving of the human predicament, of thinking about meaning for finite material beings living in a material world.
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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"…if you are interested in current debates at the interface between religion, science and moral philosophy, there is much in this book that will engage you." —Rupert Gethin, Times Higher Education

"Brilliant…Flanagan brings much needed clarity, insight and sophistication to the debate." — Julian Baggini, The Observer

"I can't recommend this book enough. It's thoughtful in the best sense of the word. It you're a Buddhist (or someone leaning towards Buddhism) who likes to wrestle with philosophical issues, it will help you to think things through more clearly. If you are a Buddhist who is inclined toward Naturalism, it's always nice to find another ally. Best of all, it's fun to read." — Seth Segall, The Existential Buddhist

"It is true that science has yet to produce good explanations of consciousness,value and free will. The suggestion brought to the fore by Flanagan — that Buddhism may be a source of insight in these areas — is a welcome and tantalizing one." —Nature

"[T]he most important question may be whether the cultivation of Buddhist virtues will lead to the sort of happiness that comes with the sense that...life has meaning and value....Flanagan has many insightful things to say about this claim." — The Philosopher'sMagazine

"Owen Flanagan writes with warmth, wisdom and wit. The Bodhisattva'sBrain is a milestone of cosmopolitan thought and should be read widely by philosophers,cognitive scientists, theologians and anyone concerned with human flourishing and the meaning of life."— Times Literary Supplement

"a trailblazing work which opens up new horizons for exciting comparative work in philosophy and psychology." — Mind

"Scholars and cognoscenti of Buddhism may find this a somewhat frustrating book; but all interested in Buddhism may read it and find discussions of interest and value….Above all,Flanagan has put on the table the issue of what a naturalized Buddhism is. If Buddhism is to move into the West significantly, I think it will have to go this way. The book, then, opens the way for many important future debates." — Philosophical Quarterly

Times Higher Education - Rupert Gethin

... if you are interested in current debates at the interface between religion, science and moral philosophy, there is much in this book that will engage you.

The Observer - Julian Baggini

Brilliant.... Flanagan brings much needed clarity, insight and sophistication to the debate.

The Existential Buddhist - Seth Segall

I can't recommend this book enough. It's thoughtful in the best sense of the word. It you're a Buddhist (or someone leaning towards Buddhism) who likes to wrestle with philosophical issues, it will help you to think things through more clearly. If you are a Buddhist who is inclined toward Naturalism, it's always nice to find another ally. Best of all, it's fun to read.

Nature

It is true that science has yet to produce good explanations of consciousness, value and free will. The suggestion brought to the fore by Flanagan -- that Buddhism may be a source of insight in these areas -- is a welcome and tantalizing one.

The Philosopher's Magazine

[T]he most important question may be whether the cultivation of Buddhist virtues will lead to the sort of happiness that comes with the sense that... life has meaning and value.... Flanagan has many insightful things to say about this claim.

Times Literary Supplement

Owen Flanagan writes with warmth, wisdom and wit. The
Bodhisattva's Brain
is a milestone of cosmopolitan thought and should be read widely by philosophers, cognitive scientists, theologians and anyone concerned with human flourishing and the meaning of life.

Mind

A trailblazing work which opens up new horizons for exciting comparative work in philosophy and psychology.

Philosophical Quarterly

Scholars and cognoscenti of Buddhism may find this a somewhat frustrating book; but all interested in Buddhism may read it and find discussions of interest and value.... Above all, Flanagan has put on the table the issue of what a naturalized Buddhism is. If Buddhism is to move into the West significantly, I think it will have to go this way. The book, then, opens the way for many important future debates.

Nature

It is true that science has yet to produce good explanations of consciousness, value and free will. The suggestion brought to the fore by Flanagan
-- that Buddhism may be a source of insight in these areas -- is a welcome and tantalizing one.

Mind

A trailblazing work which opens up new horizons for exciting comparative work in philosophy and psychology.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780262297233
  • Publisher: MIT Press
  • Publication date: 8/12/2011
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 280
  • Sales rank: 771,183
  • File size: 638 KB

Meet the Author

Owen Flanagan is James B. Duke Professor of Philosophy at Duke University. He is the author of Consciousness Reconsidered and The Really
Hard Problem: Meaning in a Material World
, both published by the MIT
Press, and other books.
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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 22, 2012

    This fooI's cup is full

    The best way to describe this mound of barren and arrogantly myopic research is to present the old Buddhist story:

    Duke university professor once visited a famous Zen master. While the master quietly served tea, the professor talked on and on about disembodied consciousness and taxonomy of conscious-mental-state
    The master poured the visitor’s cup to the brim, and then kept pouring and pouring as the tea overflowed onto the table.
    “It’s overfull! No more will go in!” the professor blurted.

    Master replied,"Like this cup,you are full of your own opinions and speculations. “How can I show you Dharma unless you first empty your cup?"

    1 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 1, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

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