The Body in Early Modern Italy

Overview

Human bodies have been represented and defined in various ways across different cultures and historical periods. As an object of interpretation and site of social interaction, the body has throughout history attracted more attention than perhaps any other element of human experience. The essays in this volume explore the manifestations of the body in Italian society from the fourteenth through the seventeenth centuries.

Adopting a variety of interdisciplinary approaches, these ...

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Overview

Human bodies have been represented and defined in various ways across different cultures and historical periods. As an object of interpretation and site of social interaction, the body has throughout history attracted more attention than perhaps any other element of human experience. The essays in this volume explore the manifestations of the body in Italian society from the fourteenth through the seventeenth centuries.

Adopting a variety of interdisciplinary approaches, these fresh and thought-provoking essays offer original perspectives on corporeality as understood in the early modern literature, art, architecture, science, and politics of Italy. An impressively diverse group of contributors comment on a broad range and variety of conceptualizations of the body, creating a rich dialogue among scholars of early modern Italy.

Contributors: Albert R. Ascoli, University of California, Berkeley; Douglas Biow, The University of Texas at Austin; Margaret Brose, University of California, Santa Cruz; Anthony Colantuono, University of Maryland, College Park; Elizabeth Horodowich, New Mexico State University; Sergius Kodera, New Design University, St. Pölten, Austria; Jeanette Kohl, University of California, Riverside; D. Medina Lasansky, Cornell University; Luca Marcozzi, Roma Tre University; Ronald L. Martinez, Brown University; Katharine Park, Harvard University; Sandra Schmidt, Free University of Berlin; Bette Talvacchia, University of Connecticut

Johns Hopkins University Press

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Editorial Reviews

Midwest Book Review
A highly insightful look into history and art, a top pick for such collections for both community and college libraries.
Choice

A collection for those interested in Italian and comparative literature, early modern studies, cultural history, or gender studies.

Clio
The broad scope of the essays and the questions they raise will be of compelling importance to any reader interested in the Renaissance, not only the Italian Renaissance, and to scholars across the disciplines from literature, performance, art history, and philosophy to sexuality, gender studies, and science.

— Bella Mirabella

Sixteenth-Century Journal
The book goes beyond the studies that are conventionally understood as the sphere of "the body" to include deportment in public and private, gymnastics, warfare, dueling and hunting.

— Christine Meek

Early Modern Women: An Interdisciplinary Journal
This fine work stands as evidence of the benefits of interdisciplinarity.

— Holly S. Hurlburt

European History Quarterly
The Body in Early Modern Italy is a welcome addition to the literature on gender and sexuality. The majority of its essays employ innovative methodologies that yield fresh insights into the norms and transgressions of the early modern body... The book will be valuable to a range of scholars and students, and is an important contribution to the study of early modern notions of the body.

— Joyce de Vries

Renaissance Quarterly
The interdisciplinary approach of The Body in Early Modern Italy is a great success.

— Cynthia Nazarian

European History Quarterly - Joyce de Vries
A welcome addition to the literature on gender and sexuality. The majority of its essays employ innovative methodologies that yield fresh insights into the norms and transgressions of the early modern body... The book will be valuable to a range of scholars and students, and is an important contribution to the study of early modern notions of the body.
Clio - Bella Mirabella
The broad scope of the essays and the questions they raise will be of compelling importance to any reader interested in the Renaissance, not only the Italian Renaissance, and to scholars across the disciplines from literature, performance, art history, and philosophy to sexuality, gender studies, and science.
Sixteenth Century Journal - Christine Meek
The book goes beyond the studies that are conventionally understood as the sphere of "the body" to include deportment in public and private, gymnastics, warfare, dueling and hunting.
Early Modern Women: An Interdisciplinary Journal - Holly S. Hurlburt
This fine work stands as evidence of the benefits of interdisciplinarity.
Renaissance Quarterly - Cynthia Nazarian
The interdisciplinary approach of The Body in Early Modern Italy is a great success.
Choice
A collection for those interested in Italian and comparative literature, early modern studies, cultural history, or gender studies.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780801894145
  • Publisher: Johns Hopkins University Press
  • Publication date: 2/23/2010
  • Pages: 448
  • Product dimensions: 6.20 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 1.40 (d)

Meet the Author

Julia L. Hairston is the associate academic director of the University of California, Rome Study Center, where she teaches courses in Italian literature. She has published articles in Renaissance Quarterly, Exemplaria, and MLN and is coeditor of Gendered Contexts: New Perspectives in Italian Cultural Studies. Walter Stephens is the Charles S. Singleton Professor of Italian Studies at the Johns Hopkins University and author of Demon Lovers: Witchcraft, Sex, and the Crisis of Belief and Giants in Those Days: Folklore, Ancient History, and Nationalism.

Johns Hopkins University Press

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