Body Parts and Bodies Whole

Overview

This volume grew out of an interdisciplinary discussion held in the context of the Leverhulme-funded project 'Changing Beliefs in the Human Body', through which the image of the body in pieces soon emerged as a potent site of attitudes about the body and associated practices in many periods. Archaeologists routinely encounter parts of human and animal bodies in their excavations. Such fragmentary evidence has often been created through accidental damage and the passage of time - nevertheless, it can also signify ...
See more details below
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (10) from $29.53   
  • New (5) from $38.58   
  • Used (5) from $29.53   
Sending request ...

Overview

This volume grew out of an interdisciplinary discussion held in the context of the Leverhulme-funded project 'Changing Beliefs in the Human Body', through which the image of the body in pieces soon emerged as a potent site of attitudes about the body and associated practices in many periods. Archaeologists routinely encounter parts of human and animal bodies in their excavations. Such fragmentary evidence has often been created through accidental damage and the passage of time - nevertheless, it can also signify a deliberate and meaningful act of fragmentation. As a fragment, a part may acquire a distinct meaning through its enchained relationship to the whole or alternatively it may be used in a more straightforward manner to represent the whole or even act as stand-in for other variables. This collection of papers puts bodily fragmentation into a long-term historical perspective. The temporal spread of the papers collected here indicates both the consistent importance and the varied perception of body parts in the archaeological record of Europe and the Near East. By bringing case studies together from a range of locations and time periods, each chapter brings a different insight to the role of body parts and body wholes and explores the status of the body in different cultural contexts. Many of the papers deal directly with the physical remains of the dead body, but the range of practices and representations covered in this volume confirm the sheer variability of treatments of the body throughout human history. Every one of the contributions shows how looking at how the human body is divided into pieces or parts can give us deeper insights into the beliefs of the particular society which produced these practices and representations.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Paleoanthropology - Isabelle Winder
...this book is a valuable source of ideas for anyone interested in concepts of the body.'
Read More Show Less

Product Details

Table of Contents

1. Body Parts and Bodies Whole: Introduction
(Katharina Rebay-Salisbury, Marie Louise Stig Sørensen, Jessica Hughes)
2. Bodies in pieces in the Neolithic Near East
(Karina Croucher)
3. Parts to a whole: Manipulations of the body in prehistoric Eastern Mediterranean
(Kirsi O. Lorentz)
4. ‘Deviant’ burials in the Neolithic and Chalcolithic of Central and South Eastern Europe
(John Chapman)
5. Ageing as fragmentation and dis-integration
(Joanna Appleby)
6. Bronze Age bodiness – maps and coordinates
(Marie Louise Stig Sørensen)
7. Cremations: fragmented bodies in the Bronze and Iron Ages
(Katharina Rebay-Salisbury)
8. Reconfiguring anatomy: ceramics, cremation and cosmology in the Late Bronze Age in the Lower Danube
(Nona Palincas)
9. Porticos, pillars and severed heads: the display and curation of human remains in the southern French Iron Age
(Ian Armit)
10. Dissecting the Classical Hybrid
(Jessica Hughes)
11. Split Bodies in the Late Iron Age/Viking Age of Scandinavia
(Lotte Hedeager)
12. Heart burial in medieval and early post-medieval central Europe
(Estella Weiss-Krejci)
13. In the pursuit of knowledge: Dissection, post-mortem surgery and the retention of body parts in 18th- and 19th-century Britain
(Annia Cherryson)
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)