Bona Fide

( 1 )

Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - David McGee
After an ill-fated stab at mainstream country, the Gibson Brothers' return to the bluegrass fold on Bona Fide -- an all-acoustic outing spotlighting Eric Gibson's banjo and Marc MacGlashan's mandolin -- could not have been more eloquent. Tender sentiments, lilting melodies, and a gentle, bracing rhythmic drive permeate both the original songs by Eric and Leigh Gibson and a choice batch of covers, ranging from the traditional breakup lament "Beautiful Brown Eyes" to Tom T. Hall's sepia-toned slice of old Americana, "Don't Forget the Coffee, Billy Joe" with a cameo by Tom T. himself. The brothers, who write both separately and together, evince an eye for the telling ...
See more details below
Other sellers (CD)
  • All (4) from $12.76   
  • New (4) from $12.76   

Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - David McGee
After an ill-fated stab at mainstream country, the Gibson Brothers' return to the bluegrass fold on Bona Fide -- an all-acoustic outing spotlighting Eric Gibson's banjo and Marc MacGlashan's mandolin -- could not have been more eloquent. Tender sentiments, lilting melodies, and a gentle, bracing rhythmic drive permeate both the original songs by Eric and Leigh Gibson and a choice batch of covers, ranging from the traditional breakup lament "Beautiful Brown Eyes" to Tom T. Hall's sepia-toned slice of old Americana, "Don't Forget the Coffee, Billy Joe" with a cameo by Tom T. himself. The brothers, who write both separately and together, evince an eye for the telling detail. This is manifest in the sharp distinctions of the brisk "Ragged Man," which heralds the burgeoning class warfare between brothers whose lives are headed for different strata; this track also features one of four memorable guest shots by the Del McCoury Band's estimable fiddler Jason Carter. Equally notable is the somber "Railroad Line," a poignant depiction of a community and a way of life rent asunder by the decline of the steel rail, with the mournful strains of Jeff Taylor's lonely accordion solos magnifying the enduring sorrow left behind. The brothers harmonize beautifully on the marchlike strains of "Arleigh," a fond reminiscence of their granddad's tireless work ethic, while Eric shows off some heartfelt crooning in "Vern's Guitar," a quiet, folk-styled tale of a widow's prized heirloom. Sister Erin Gibson lends her pure, keening voice, so reminiscent of Iris DeMent's, to the lead vocal and group harmony of the stately inspirational album closer, "The Lighthouse," a perfect sign-off to an album as soulful as it is masterfully executed.
All Music Guide - Ronnie D. Lankford
Once upon a time, one could be assured that bluegrass bands, wherever they happened to be playing to make a buck or two, originated from the South. It was Southern music, after all, but thanks to radio and records, this regional music traveled to such odd places as upstate New York. Eric and Leigh Gibson grew up listening to first and second-generation bluegrass, so it only made sense that when they formed a band, they'd emulate their heroes. Together with mandolinist Marc MacGlashan and bassist Mike Barber, The Gibson Brothers have cut a disc of original material informed by tradition. In fact, when listening to a cut like "Where Nobody Knows My Name" it's easy to imagine that this band is from the South. First, their brother harmony reaches back to the Delmores and Monroes, and next, both singers fill their lead vocals with country accents. A down-home bluegrass quality also pervades pieces like "Ragged Man" and "Open Road," giving these songs lots of bounce and pizzazz. The arrangements of guitar, banjo, fiddle, and bass are fairly straightforward and the instrumental interplay lively. Most of these pieces only last two or three minutes, though, so the emphasis is placed on the vocals and the songs themselves, which is just fine. The album ends with a nicely handled guest vocal by sister Erin Gibson on "The Lighthouse," and she is superbly supported by her big brothers. Bona Fide will please old fans, bluegrass fanatics, and anyone who enjoys good singing.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • Release Date: 3/11/2003
  • Label: Sugarhill
  • UPC: 015891396521
  • Catalog Number: 3965
  • Sales rank: 95,167

Tracks

Disc 1
  1. 1 The Open Raod
  2. 2 Arleigh
  3. 3 Ragged Man
  4. 4 Railroad Line
  5. 5 The Bluegrass Music
  6. 6 Vern's Guitar
  7. 7 Where Nobody Knows My Name
  8. 8 Shucking The Corn
  9. 9 Don't Forget The Coffee, Billy Joe
  10. 10 Whisper In My Ear
  11. 11 Norma
  12. 12 Beautiful Brown Eyes
  13. 13 The Lighthouse
Read More Show Less

Album Credits

Performance Credits
The Gibson Brothers Primary Artist, Primary Artist
Tom T. Hall Guest Appearance
Luke Bulla Fiddle
Jeff Taylor Accordion
Eric Gibson Banjo, Rhythm Guitar, Vocal Harmony
Leigh Gibson Guitar, Rhythm Guitar, Vocals, Vocal Harmony
Marc MacGlashan Mandolin
Mike Barber Guitar, Upright Bass
Technical Credits
Roy Acuff Composer
Randy LeRoy Mastering
Dave Sinko Engineer
Eric Gibson Producer
Leigh Gibson Producer
Arthur Smith Composer
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 1 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(1)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Sincere, authentic and genuine....AND a fuller and more visceral brand of bluegrass than they did a decade ago

    About seven years ago, Eric and Leigh Gibson were telling me about their brand of bluegrass which emphasized the old theory that "less is more." They described it as bluegrass with control in which the instruments don't crowd the singer or other instruments. In other words, they believed in letting their music breathe. At the time, the Gibson Brothers weren't including a fiddle and mandolin in their lineup either. Leigh played guitar, and Eric picked banjo. In 1994, they released their first album on the Big Elm label, then they signed with the Hay Holler label. After winning the 1998 IBMA Emerging Artist Award, the group contracted with Ceili Records. Now, the two brothers who were raised on a dairy farm in upstate New York have joined the roster of one of bluegrass' most renown labels, Sugar Hill. Mike Barber has reunited with the brothers on upright bass. Their band sound is fuller with the likes of Marc MacClashan picking mandolin, and Jason Carter or Luke Bulla playing fiddle on this album. Sam Zucchini and Jeff Taylor also add bodhran and accordion, respectively, to one song apiece. Erin Gibson's singing on "Beautiful Brown Eyes" and "The Lighthouse" is a welcome treat. The Gibsons still emphasize two-part brother harmony, and it might be nice on future releases to hear more trios from the band, with little sis singing lead or harmony. The brothers' repertoire has always been characterized by strong original material, and this project offers nine songs written or co-written by one or both of the Gibsons. Standouts include those that tell hard-hitting stories (Railroad Line, Vern's Guitar, Where Nobody Knows My Name) or paint vivid portraits of people (Arleigh, Ragged Man, Norma). Also, their newgrassy "That Bluegrass Music" is a testament to their love for the genre. This album screams when "Shucking the Corn" spins, and Tom T. Hall's "Don't Forget the Coffee, Billy Joe" (complete with Tom T.'s cameo line "now pay attention, son") seems a tongue-in-cheek statement regarding misplaced priorities in a troubled world. The Gibson Brothers now offer a fuller and more visceral brand of bluegrass than they did a decade ago. Bona Fide, is a top-notch album, and as the title claims, the Gibson Brothers' bluegrass is sincere, authentic and genuine. (Joe Ross, staff writer, Bluegrass Now)

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews