Bonaparte

Bonaparte

5.0 1
by Marsha Wilson Chall, Wendy Anderson Halperin, Dorling Kindersley Publishing Staff
     
 

What's a hound who misses his boy to do?

Bonaparte is devastated. He is distraught. He is desolee. His boy, Jean Claude, has been sent away to La School d'Excellence. And the first rule of La School d'Excellence is NO DOGS ALLOWED.
But Bonaparte is also determined- to see his beloved Jean Claude again. And so, on Monday morning, he marches up to the…  See more details below

Overview

What's a hound who misses his boy to do?

Bonaparte is devastated. He is distraught. He is desolee. His boy, Jean Claude, has been sent away to La School d'Excellence. And the first rule of La School d'Excellence is NO DOGS ALLOWED.
But Bonaparte is also determined- to see his beloved Jean Claude again. And so, on Monday morning, he marches up to the front door of the school. The registrar is firm: NO DOGS ALLOWED.
Perhaps on Wednesday they'll believe he's a student; or, on Thursday, a drummer in the school band; or, on Friday, a lunch lady. Zut alors! His every attempt to see Jean Claude is thwarted. NO DOGS ALLOWED.
Will Bonaparte finally make his way into La School d'Excellence? Mais oui...only to discover that Jean Claude, also desolee, is missing!
Who better to sniff out the lost boy than his own beloved hound? Through the cafes and kiosks of Paris, across the wide boulevards, over farmers' cobbled walls, Bonaparte searches....
With magnificent drawings, full of details to discover with each new reading, Bonaparte is a cold-nosed, warm-hearted tale of liberte, egalite, and fraternite.

Halperin's detailed pencil-and-watercolor illustrations, dominated with pastel tones of pinks, lilacs, and blues, re-create the France of cafes and chateaus, of art galleries and carousels. (The Horn Book)

The language in this well-told story stretches readers' imagination....readers will pore over the details in the pictures, panel by panel. (School Library Journal)

... everyone will applaud this Gallic tale of boy and dog separated, then reunited....drawn with vanishingly fine, but clear lines and exquisitely controlled color, every tiny detail in the harmonious illustrations is distinct, waiting to be picked out by fascinated viewers. (Kirkus Reviews)

No dogs are allowed at La School d'Excellence, but Bonaparte doesn't let that stop him from trying to see his boy, Jean Claude. Every day he tries a hilarious new scheme to get in. He masquerades as Jean Claude's mother, applies for a student admission, and even serves as a lunch lady, hairnet and all. But he's foiled at every turn. Discouraged but determined, he returns as a janitor, and is on hand when the regents discover Jean Claude has run away. Then it's Bonaparte to the rescue, as he sets out, nose to the ground, to find his beloved Jean Claude. Halperin's highly detailed, realistic watercolor-and-pencil illustrations are wonderfully expressive and humorous, giving youngsters a glimpse of scenic Paris bridges, fountains, and sculptures. The full single-or double-page pictures are best; less successful are the small snapshotlike pictures, which sometimes make the spread seem cluttered. This humorous and heartwarming tale will engage youngsters, especially those who have a special bond with a pet of their own. (Booklist)

Fresh as a newly baked croissant, this delightful confection finds a lonely -pooch longing for his young master's warm lap and 'determined to find his boy' after Jean Claude is sent off to boarding school. Sadly, 'La School d'Excellence' has a strict policy: 'NO DOGS ALLOWED.' This doesn't deter Bonaparte, however, who sniffs out Jean Claude's trail Halperin's charming pencil and watercolor panel drawings chronicle the canine's route through the breathtaking streets of Paris, with its cafes, fountains and fruit stands (one heartbreaking vignette shows the furry fellow sleeping 'on a pillow of stone' at the foot of a statue), until he storms the school's gates. He arrives daily in a different disguise—as the boy's mother, he's twigged when he offers the registrar his dog licenses as I.D.; as a new drummer in the high school band, his tail (which wags 'in four-quarter time' gives his away. The day Bonaparte turns up as the new janitor, his canine talents are finally appreciated: Jean Claude is discovered missing and it's up to Bonaparte to track him down. Chall's narrative strikes just the right balance between humor and feelings of loss in this captivating dog-loses-boy, dog-gets-boy tale. Her words together with the artwork's elaborate borders and delicately detailed drawings will waltz straight off the pages and into readers' hearts. Encore! (Publishers Weekly, (Starred Review))

Author Biography: Martha Wilson Chall has written several books for children, including Rupa Raises the Sun, illustrated by Rosanne Litzinger and published by DK Ink. Other works include Sugarbush Spring, Up North at the Cabin, and Mattie. She lives in Minnetonka, Minnesota, with her family and frequent canine visitor, Hank.
Wendy Anderson Halperin has illustrated many books for children including Sophie and Rose, by Kathryn Lasky; Homeplace, by Anne Shelby; Hunting the White Cow, by Tres Seymour; and, most recently, The Full Belly Bowl by Jim Aylesworth, and Once Upon a Company, which Ms. Halperin also wrote. Ms. Halperin lives in Interlochen, Michigan, with her family.

Read More

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Fresh as a newly baked croissant, this delightful confection finds a lonely pooch longing for his young master's warm lap and "determined to find his boy" after Jean Claude is sent off to boarding school. Sadly, "La School d'Excellence" has a strict policy: "NO DOGS ALLOWED." This doesn't deter Bonaparte, however, who sniffs out Jean Claude's trail. Halperin's (Sophie and Rose) charming pencil and watercolor panel drawings chronicle the canine's route through the breathtaking streets of Paris, with its cafs, fountains and fruit stands (one heartbreaking vignette shows the furry fellow sleeping "on a pillow of stone" at the foot of a statue), until he storms the school's gates. He arrives daily in a different disguise as the boy's mother, he's twigged when he offers the registrar his dog license as I.D.; as a new drummer in the high school band, his tail (which wags "in four-quarter time") gives him away. The day Bonaparte turns up as the new janitor, his canine talents are finally appreciated: Jean Claude is discovered missing and it's up to Bonaparte to track him down. Chall's (Rupa Raises the Sun) narrative strikes just the right balance between humor and feelings of loss in this captivating dog-loses-boy, dog-gets-boy tale. Her words together with the artwork's elaborate borders and delicately detailed drawings will waltz straight off the pages and into readers' hearts. Encore! Ages 4-8. (Sept.) Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.|
Children's Literature
Bonaparte is the most adorable dog we have encountered in ages! He is distraught when his boy, Jean Claude is sent away from the chateau to La School d'Excellence in Paris. As Bonaparte finds out the hard way when he goes to find his best friend, the school's first rule is "No Dogs Allowed." Our canine hero is not easily deterred, however, and dresses and claims to be in turn Jean Claude's mother, a student himself, a lunch room lady, and a janitor, only to be thwarted at each attempt. Finally, he discovers that his boy has run away, and is only admitted to the school when he brings Jean Claude back. The "No Dogs" rule becomes "Now Dogs Allowed!" The illustrations for this story are charming. Pen and watercolor are used in delicate and highly detailed pictures that feel French. Wonderful borders surround each page, inviting close inspection and repeated reading. 2000, DK Ink/Dorling Kindersley Publishing Inc.,
School Library Journal - School Library Journal
Gr 1-3-Bonaparte, a shaggy dog, misses his school-bound boy so much that he ventures from their village to Paris for a reunion. Unfortunately, La School d'Excellence has a "no dogs allowed" policy that hardly deters the clever canine from donning disguises to gain entry. Though barred at every turn, he and Jean Claude eventually connect and even affect change at the stuffy school. The language in this well-told story stretches readers' imagination-"Alone late that night on a pillow of stone, Bonaparte longed for the warm lap where he'd sprawled, lumpy and baggy with ease." Every page is bordered by a unique and sometimes elaborate pattern. This frame is then subdivided into sections. Within each one, a pencil-and-watercolor image embellishes the plot. All text is housed within its own dialogue box on every page. Readers will pore over the details in the pictures, panel by panel. Love conquers all in Bonaparte.-Linda M. Kenton, San Rafael Public Library, CA Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.|
Charmingly told by Marsha Chall and beautifully illustrated by Wendy Anderson Halperin, Bonaparte is the story of a persistent dog who travels from his village in order to find his boy. Jean Claude is the newest student at La School D'excellence in Paris and Bonaparte would do anything to find him. But how can a dog gain admittance to the school? As a band member? A lunch lady? A janitor? Getting to Jean Claude is harder than it looks, because the school registrar isn't fooled for long. Bonaparte is a wonderful, engaging, entertaining, highly recommended picturebook story for young readers rising from the recognizable bonds that evolve between a dog and his boy.
Kirkus Reviews
Language purists may wince, but everyone else will applaud this Gallic tale of boy and dog separated, then reunited. "NO DOGS ALLOWED" reads the sign outside La School d'Excellence, and so young Jean Claude Jean is forced to leave his faithful Bonaparte back at the chateau. Bonaparte has other ideas, trying again and again to outwit the school's rather nearsighted overseers. But when a last disguise finally works, Jean Claude is gone. Undismayed, Bonaparte offers his tracking services to the panicked trustees. Never one to leave a page unfilled, Halperin expands the short text considerably, fitting sequential scenes, views of Bonaparte searching city streets, thumbnail portraits and, for good measure, the occasional row of dogs or pastries, all within a series of patterned borders. Busy? Yes. Jumbled? Not at all. Because it's drawn with vanishingly fine, but clear lines and exquisitely controlled color, every tiny detail in the harmonious illustrations is distinct, waiting to be picked out by fascinated viewers. In the end, Bonaparte tracks down his wayward boy, and the grateful trustees add a "W" to the "NO" on their sign—prompting a wave of new canine admissions. A chien sans peur is Bonaparte, coupling engagingly doggy devotion with rare ingenuity. (Picture book. 69)

Read More

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780789426178
Publisher:
DK Publishing, Inc.
Publication date:
08/30/2000
Edition description:
1 ED
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.10(w) x 12.00(h) x 0.34(d)
Lexile:
AD410L (what's this?)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Bonaparte 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I adore this book. It's roll-on-the-floor funny, with one of the smartest dogs ever to grace the pages of a book. Buy this one for your kids--it'll quickly be one of their favorites. A true child-and-his-dog story, in which Bonaparte tries every trick and every disguise to break into the boarding school where his best friend has gone. The illustrations are filled with new things to look at every time I open the book. How does the illustrator do that?! Thanks, Ms. Chall, for writing such a terrific book and Ms. Halperin for illustrating it so well.