The Bond: Three Young Men Learn to Forgive and Reconnect with Their Fathers

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Overview

The Three Doctors—Drs. Sampson Davis, George Jenkins, and Rameck Hunt—discovered early in their friendship that they shared one disturbing trait: as children, they had to navigate life in inner-city Newark without a father's support and guidance. While each young man dealt with the turmoil caused by an absent father, with no male role model to turn to for advice, each veered dangerously close to a life of delinquency, drugs, and crime. But despite great odds, the three overcame the statistics. In high school, ...
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Overview

The Three Doctors—Drs. Sampson Davis, George Jenkins, and Rameck Hunt—discovered early in their friendship that they shared one disturbing trait: as children, they had to navigate life in inner-city Newark without a father's support and guidance. While each young man dealt with the turmoil caused by an absent father, with no male role model to turn to for advice, each veered dangerously close to a life of delinquency, drugs, and crime. But despite great odds, the three overcame the statistics. In high school, they formed the Pact, a promise to one another that they would become doctors, and it kept them dedicated to one another and to their dream and helped to put them on the road to successful careers as physicians.

In The Bond, the Three Doctors plumb their own tough childhoods to explore the national epidemic of fatherlessness. But rather than cling to any bitterness or pain they may have felt as children about their fathers' inability to be in their lives, as adults Davis, Jenkins, and Hunt sought out their fathers and worked to reconnect with them. In the doctors' own words—and their fathers'—they describe the crucial lessons they learned, identifying ways to stem the tide of fatherlessness that's sweeping through communities across the country. Honest, brave, and poignant, The Bond is a book for every family, every father, and every man.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

In this affecting follow-up to The Pact, Davis, Jenkins and Hunt ("The Three Doctors" as they call themselves) turn from their shared friendship to the more tenuous relationships they shared with their absent fathers. Focusing again on their childhood and youth, they each reflect separately on the effects of growing up fatherless in inner-city Newark, N.J. Whether missing lessons as basic as shaving or tying a necktie or as serious as developing self-confidence, all three conclude that they would have been more prepared for the obstacles they faced growing up if they had had a stable father figure. Instead, they had to turn to the streets for answers, which included distorted views of women and masculinity. The authors offer little new information about growing up without a father. However, some of their suggestions ("find a mentor" and "realize fathering isn't just financial," for example) do bear repeating, and in the context of these three young men's lives, they gain further relevance. The book includes chapters written by the authors' absentee fathers, who, refreshingly, do not make excuses for their shortcomings but give insights into their failures-including their own lack of a father figure-and provide an understanding that humanizes them and enables their sons to forgive them. (Oct.)

Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information
Library Journal

This painful, unflinching, yet uplifting and optimistic sequel to the New York Times best seller The Pact takes the three medical professionals further on their quest. Each attained his goal of becoming a doctor despite the overwhelming obstacles of being fatherless inner-city boys. Now they decide to learn to know the men who sired them. Alternating chapters give the father and son the opportunity to explain what happened and why. The sons conclude that learning more about their fathers, even later in life, helped them cope with the loss. Generally, the fathers are honest and direct in explaining their reasons for abandoning their vulnerable families. It is also apparent that both generations could have succumbed to crime, alcohol, and drugs. All agree that often bad times can bring about positive change. The doctors also illustrate the importance of mothers in this moving tribute to the vital role these women played in their sons' lives. The book closes by offering ways to repair relationships and help the community to stem the tide of fatherlessness. Narrator Richard Allen's rich voice breathes life into these old and young men alike; he also enhances the diverse quotes that make up this wonderful story. The Bond belongs in all African American, self-help, and medium-sized and large library collections.
—Susan G. Baird

From the Publisher
"This is a book that every father and every family should read and take to heart. It's honest and brave and true." —-Queen Latifah, musician, actress, and author of Ladies First
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781615595068
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA)
  • Publication date: 10/4/2007
  • Pages: 272
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 8.90 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Meet the Author


Margaret Bernstein is an award-winning journalist at the Plain Dealer in Cleveland, Ohio.

Sampson Davis is a board-certified emergency medicine physician at St. Michael's Medical Center and assistant medical director of the Emergency Department at Raritan Bay Medical Center.

Rameck Hunt is a board-certified internist at University Medical Center at Princeton and an assistant professor of medicine at Robert Wood Johnson Medical School.

George Jenkins is an assistant professor of clinical dentistry at Columbia University and coauthor of the New York Times bestseller The Pact.

Richard Allen is a five-time Audie-nominated narrator whose work has been acknowledged on the Best Audiobooks Lists for Audiofile and Library Journal.

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Customer Reviews

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