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The Bondage of the Will (Unabridged)
     

The Bondage of the Will (Unabridged)

4.0 20
by Martin Luther
 

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"The Bondage of the Will" is a must for anyone interested in the doctrine of predestination. Luther himself declared this book to be one of the best he had ever written. The book is a response to "The Diatribe Concerning Human Freedom" by Erasmus. A great work by a masterful theologian, "The Bondage of the Will" covers what Luther believed concerning human free will,

Overview

"The Bondage of the Will" is a must for anyone interested in the doctrine of predestination. Luther himself declared this book to be one of the best he had ever written. The book is a response to "The Diatribe Concerning Human Freedom" by Erasmus. A great work by a masterful theologian, "The Bondage of the Will" covers what Luther believed concerning human free will, God's knowledge and future contingents, predestination, prevenient and efficacious grace, as well as the providence and glory of God. Luther is somewhat overbearing at times in his responses to Erasmus, but this simply helps the reader to understand Luther's personality a little better. Some will see "The Bondage of the Will" as nothing more than Martin Luther's combative apologetic against the doctrine of free will and works salvation. But this is precisely why it ranks among the best ever written because it passionately, logically, and decisively deals with the error concerning free will and the error adding any human merit to salvation. The subject matter according to Luther is "the hinge on which the whole gospel turns". "The Bondage of the Will" should be a standard text in Bible schools and seminaries.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781492106623
Publisher:
CreateSpace Publishing
Publication date:
08/08/2013
Pages:
268
Sales rank:
1,385,873
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.56(d)

Meet the Author

Martin Luther (10 November 1483 - 18 February 1546) initiated the Protestant Reformation. As a priest and theology professor, he confronted indulgence salesman Johann Tetzel with his The Ninety-Five Theses in 1517. Luther strongly disputed their claim that freedom from God's punishment of sin could be purchased with money. His refusal to retract all of his writings at the demand of Pope Leo X in 1520 and the Holy Roman Emperor Charles V at the Diet of Worms in 1521 resulted in his excommunication by the pope and condemnation as an outlaw by the emperor. Martin Luther taught that salvation is not from good works, but a free gift of God, received only by grace through faith in Jesus as redeemer from sin. His theology challenged the authority of the pope of the Roman Catholic Church by teaching that the Bible is the only source of divinely revealed knowledge and opposed sacerdotalism by considering all baptized Christians to be a holy priesthood. Those who identify with Luther's teachings are called Lutherans. His translation of the Bible into the language of the people (instead of Latin) made it more accessible, causing a tremendous impact on the church and on German culture. It fostered the development of a standard version of the German language, added several principles to the art of translation, and influenced the translation into English of the King James Bible. His hymns inspired the development of singing in churches. His marriage to Katharina von Bora set a model for the practice of clerical marriage, allowing Protestant priests to marry. In his later years, Luther became strongly anti-Judaic, writing that Jewish homes should be destroyed, their synagogues burned, money confiscated and liberty curtailed. These statements have made Luther a controversial figure among many historians and religious scholars.

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Bondage of the Will 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 20 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is being heralded as Martin Luther's defense of predestination. It foreshadows the brilliant work of Jonathan Edwards, 'Freedom of the Will,' which is also considered a defense of predestination---as are the works of other men such as John Calvin, who also wrote a similar treatise called 'On the Bondage and Liberation of the Will,' and we must not forget that centuries before any of them lived, Augustine taught predestination based on the Apostle Paul's writings. While the doctrine of predestination is set forth in all these discourses on the will, for Luther predestination, though important, had not yet moved to the center of his theology, as it did for Calvin and later Calvinists such as Jonathan Edwards. Luther did not flinch in setting forth Paul's doctrine of predestination, but that is not what this book is about. This book, like his Galatians commentary, is about salvation by grace through faith alone. It is his response to Erasmus' treatise on free will, which claimed that man had the ability in himself to respond to the Gospel (which smacked of Pelagianism to Luther), yet had to concede that this happened only with the assistance of God's grace, and only after regeneration in Christ. Luther forcefully demonstrates the inconsistencies in Erasmus' argument, showing that if humanity is hopelessly lost in sin, according to the biblical doctrine of original sin in Adam, then he has neither the ability, nor even the desire, to turn to God. Luther proves that God 'has mercy on whom he will have mercy' not according to any merit in the person whom he saves, or any action the person performs. The sovereignty of God in the salvation of men (as Edwards also expounded) is the subject of Luther in Bondage of the Will. With that proven, Luther demonstrates the futility of our attempts to please God in ourselves, and the necessity of believing in Christ for salvation, in accepting it as a gift from God. Luther was careful to teach that it was not man's place to inquire into God's hidden will, but to embrace the grace given and let it destroy Adam, the old self, before endeavoring to study predestination. It is not for 'babes' in Christ to drink this 'strong wine' (as Luther put it) but for the mature Christian who has made 'his calling and election sure.' For Luther, as for Augustine, God had not issued a decree from eternity of who would be saved and who would be damned, but was in mercy saving from the 'lump' of sinful humanity some (indeed, as Christ says, 'MANY'- Matt 20:28) to be transformed and conformed to the image of His Son, and indeed Christ's sacrifice was for the whole world, though only those who believe truly embrace the free gift. I am a living example of the damage that can be done if the doctrine of predestination is mishandled. I am also living proof that the human will truly is in bondage until the Son of God sets it free. 'Whoever sins is a slave to sin.' Luther's point is that sin is what we desire, it is in fact our very nature, and even the best in man 'falls short of the Glory of God' until we are re-created, or 'born anew.' In Christ we are new creatures created in the will of God, and this is our freedom from the bondage of our own will.
Guest More than 1 year ago
this is luther's greatest historical work in one of the world's greatest debates concerning free will and sin...erasmus was one of the brightest scholars in the history of christianity, but unfortunately he met a man with the thunderous authority of an old testament prophet....this is the doctrine, said luther, in which all else hinges... a christian classic that every one should own...
Bd1949 More than 1 year ago
The best aspect of this excellent translation of the classic work of Luther, defining the central doctrines of the Reformation, is the introduction and its explanation of the fundamental theological issue the Reformers grappled with: is regeneration the monergistic work of God and his grace, or is it a synergistic work in which the action of the individual is key? The authors deal with this issue with fairness and balance, though they come down with Luther (and Paul) on the side of God's sovereignty and grace in the work of salvation.
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