Bone Mountain (Inspector Shan Tao Yun Series #3)

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Overview

Deep in the heart of Tibet, disgraced ex-Beijing police inspector Shan Tao Yun is on the run from the brutal Chinese army. He has agreed to lead an expedition to return a long-missing stone eye to the idol from which it was stolen an act that, according to Tibetan prophecy, will save the sacred place where it rests. But the pilgrimage to this distant valley turns into a desperate flight when the monk guiding them is murdered and Shan learns that the stone eye was stolen back ...

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Overview

Deep in the heart of Tibet, disgraced ex-Beijing police inspector Shan Tao Yun is on the run from the brutal Chinese army. He has agreed to lead an expedition to return a long-missing stone eye to the idol from which it was stolen an act that, according to Tibetan prophecy, will save the sacred place where it rests. But the pilgrimage to this distant valley turns into a desperate flight when the monk guiding them is murdered and Shan learns that the stone eye was stolen back from a Chinese army brigade, who is now in hot pursuit.

Tense and moving, filled with the spiritual and geographic landscapes of the oppressed land of modern Tibet, Bone Mountain is a spectacular achievement from a major voice in crime fiction.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Intense and captivating exploration of modern Tibet.... Pattison has taken an unknown world and made it come alive."

Library Journal

"Pattison's densely plotted and incredibly detailed novel induces his entranced readers to care deeply about both his compelling characters and long-suffering Tibet."

Booklist (Starred Review)

"Despite the number of books about Tibet, few have brought us as close to ground level awareness as Eliot Pattison has done with Bone Mountain.... Though this is a deeply reflective book, it is a true late-night, page-turner delight."

Chiang Mai City Life

"Enlightening, sometimes brilliant, often moving."

Kirkus Reviews

"Pattison's empathy for the cause of Tibetan independence is admirable."

Publishers Weekly

Publishers Weekly
In this third suspenseful mystery-thriller from Edgar winner Pattison (The Skull Mantra; Water Touching Stone), discredited former Beijing police investigator Shan Tao Yun, unofficially released from a central Tibetan gulag, is now living with a group of outlaw Buddhist monks, some of whom helped him through his most unbearable prison experiences. In gratitude he and his friend, the renegade monk Lokesh, agree to escort a stolen religious artifact to the remote Yapchi Valley, the site, coincidentally, of international oil explorations, from which an American engineer has disappeared. Chinese plans to clear the valley and relocate its farmers and sheepherders to cities will profit the mining project and aid the Chinese "in another effort to pry Tibet's collective fingers from its rosary." Just as the holy artifact is a mystical symbol of Tibetan culture and Buddhism, so the multilayered story is imbued with Tibetan belief, civilization and politics. Readers with little knowledge of Tibet's religion and history may have difficulty following the plot with its large cast of varied, well-drawn Tibetans, Chinese and Americans, countless treks through rugged, stunning landscapes and the numerous side plots including several murders some of which are red herrings. Pattison's empathy for the cause of Tibetan independence is admirable, but it often overwhelms his story. The book, which is far too long and discursive, becomes a polemic that dilutes Shan's search for the truth. National author tour. (Sept. 16) Forecast: While not much in the news of late, the fate of Tibet remains a hot issue. Look for strong demand from mainstream readers, especially those with a spiritual bent. Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
Library Journal
Edgar Award winner Pattison continues the adventures of Shan in this intense and captivating exploration of modern Tibet. Shan is on a pilgrimage when he witnesses the beating death of his friend Drakte. Shan is not one to let a crime go unpunished, so he goes after the murderer. During his investigation, he clashes with the Chinese 54th Mountain Brigade, an army whose leader would love to see Shan a prisoner again. In addition, he helps an American ambassador named Winslow look for a woman geologist who mysteriously vanished. The oil company she worked for is determined to obtain its product at any cost, even if it decimates land in the process. All these events converge against the background of a harsh landscape. Much like an sf, Pattison has taken an unknown world and made it come alive. For all fiction collections. Jeff Ayers, Seattle P.L. Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780312330897
  • Publisher: St. Martin's Press
  • Publication date: 4/7/2004
  • Series: Inspector Shan Tao Yun Series , #3
  • Edition description: First Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 432
  • Sales rank: 383,852
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.50 (h) x 0.96 (d)

Meet the Author

Eliot Pattison is the author of The Skull Mantra, which won the Edgar Award and was a finalist for the Gold Dagger, as well as Water Touching Stone. Pattison is a world traveler and frequent visitor to China, and his numerous books and articles on international policy issues have been published around the world.

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Table of Contents

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 8 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 8 Customer Reviews
  • Posted May 5, 2010

    I love this series!

    This series of books is deeply revealing of contemporary Tibetan/Chinese history. Within the terrible clash of Chinese expansion into Tibet with traditional Tibetan culture, Pattison touches on the deeper commonality of Taoist practice in China, also persecuted by modern China. He never takes the route of superficial stereotypes, finding seekers on both sides. Read it!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 9, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    interesting Tibetan mystery

    Disgraced Chines police investigator Shan Tao Yun knows he owes the Buddhist monks his life as they have made his insufferable prison exile tolerable. So when they ask him to deliver a religious idol to a sacred place in the Yapchi Valley, he readily assents to taking the artifact to its home. Renegade monk Lokesh also agrees to accompany Shan on the trek. However, the journey, which is arduous, turns tragic when someone murders the guide. Shan learns that in Yapchi Valley, the Americans drill for oil, but the female engineer has fled the area. Adding to his bewilderment is that the Chinese army wants the return of the idol stolen from them before it fosters Buddhist teachings over Party lessons and in turn nurture dissent. In this mess, Shan seeks justice, but the Americans, the Chinese, and the Tibetans each have their own definition. <P>The third Shan tale provides the audience with an interesting mystery that is overshadowed by insight into the region, especially the Tibetan question, but the story line can be difficult to follow because of the deep cerebral look at Buddhism and Communism. Still the who-done-it is intriguing and Shan remains a fascinating lead protagonist, but Eliot Pattison¿s novel is more for those in the audience wanting a better understanding of life at the top of the world. <P>Harriet Klausner

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