Boogie Bones

Boogie Bones

by Elizabeth Loredo, Kevin Hawkes
     
 
Boogie Bones loves to dance, and he longs to show his stuff outside the graveyard gates. One night the wind brings him a flyer that reads "Dance Contest Saturday! Come one, come all, to the Town Hall! Prizes! Music! Romance!" Even though no skeleton has ever left the graveyard before, Boogie hatches a plan that will take him to the dance contest and win him the

Overview

Boogie Bones loves to dance, and he longs to show his stuff outside the graveyard gates. One night the wind brings him a flyer that reads "Dance Contest Saturday! Come one, come all, to the Town Hall! Prizes! Music! Romance!" Even though no skeleton has ever left the graveyard before, Boogie hatches a plan that will take him to the dance contest and win him the trophy.

Make no bones about it, Boogie is a dancer to watch. When the band strikes up the music of the tango, he sways, he taps his toes, he twitches his hips. But what will happen when a skeleton dares to shake a leg on the dance floor?

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Boogie Bones, the best skeleton dancer of all, practices his jitterbug in a misty, moonlit cemetery. Although he and his clattering cohorts are "a bit frightened of people, who [have] no bones about them," he slips into a moldy tuxedo, baseball cap and mustache disguise to attend a dance contest among the living. There he watches a couple who cha-cha with "noses turned up and toes turned down," then selects a partner for the tango. His rambunctious behavior lands him in trouble, however. When Boogie's disguise flies off and his secret is revealed, the author resorts to a generic gambit: a fearless girl steps from the horrified crowd to trip the light fantastic. Hawkes (By the Light of the Halloween Moon) contrasts shadowy midnight scenes, shrouded in greenish pastel fog, with the brightly lit, golden interior of the dance hall. He rises to the challenge of making the skeleton's face expressive, although highly observant audiences may wonder how Boogie can squint his eyes with glee. An apt closing imagea dance trophy against a granite headstonesums up the volume's gothic humor. Meanwhile, Loredo's (Mystery on the Mississippi) homespun narration evokes good-natured charm rather than morbid and ghostly thoughts, and ends on a witty, ironic note ("That was the happiest night of Boogie Bones's life"). Ages 4-8. (Aug.)
Children's Literature - Deborah Zink Roffino
What is it about skeletons that begs to have them dance? Must be those lanky, limber legs! Out in the country, where cold, gray tombstones lean like crooked teeth in the midst of a midnight blue cemetery, it's just a bit too quiet for one restless resident, the rambunctious Boogie Bones. He is determined to abandon the sleepy graveyard for the lively clatter of a dance hall. Although his rattling bones frighten most the regulars, little pig-tailed Maggie Brown takes him on for a partner. Fearful fun ensues as Boogie Bones cuts the rug on his way to a trophy in the dance contest.
School Library Journal
K-Gr 2Boogie Bones, a skeleton who loves to dance, longs to show his stuff beyond the graveyard's iron gates but is a little intimidated by people. One night he enters a dance contest at the Town Hall, disguising himself with a hat and tuxedo. All goes well until he launches into the lindy hop and wriggles and jiggles right out of his clothes. Onlookers are aghast to see a skeleton in their midst. Only a small girl is unafraid to dance with him, and her courage inspires everyone else to clap along. "That was the happiest night of Boogie Bones's life." The ending falls a trifle flat, but the tale will delight young fans of ghost stories. Featuring brightly clad humans with Ping-Pong ball eyes and chalky skeletons in haunting shades, the illustrations are appropriately ghoulish and funny.Sally R. Dow, Ossining Public Library, NY
Kirkus Reviews
Boogie Bones just loves to dance, hardly slowed by his condition: He is a skeleton who lives in a graveyard. When he hears about a dance competition, his fellows hide his bones in an old tuxedo and off he goes. He gets through the tango fine, but when the band begins to play his favorite tune for doing the lindy hop, the clothes fly off to reveal the skeleton. A young girl with Boogie's cap over her braids is unafraid, and they dance "until her braids were a blur and her skirt spread like a blossom." Rich colors and broad humor characterize the rollicking, completely unscary pictures; each spread captures something of the movement and joy of dance. Exceptionally silly.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780399227639
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
08/18/1997
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.36(w) x 10.30(h) x 0.32(d)
Lexile:
AD610L (what's this?)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

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