Book! Book! Book!

Book! Book! Book!

by Deborah Bruss, Tiphanie Beeke
     
 

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You think it�s easy to check a book out of the library? Well, not if you�re a cow!When the children go back to school, the animals on the farm have nothing to do. That is . . . until they discover the building with the word �Library� on the front. But when Cow, Pig, Horse, and Goat try to check out a book, they are me t with a very puzzled librarian. Why can�t she…  See more details below

Overview

You think it�s easy to check a book out of the library? Well, not if you�re a cow!When the children go back to school, the animals on the farm have nothing to do. That is . . . until they discover the building with the word �Library� on the front. But when Cow, Pig, Horse, and Goat try to check out a book, they are me t with a very puzzled librarian. Why can�t she understand? It is only when Hen gives it a try��book! Book! BOOK!��that the animals finally get what they want!

Editorial Reviews

Bored because the farm children have gone back to school, a group of animals hikes into town one day. They see adults and children with happy faces emerging from a building labeled "Public Library," so one by one the animals enter to find something to do. The friendly librarian can't understand their neighs, moos, baaahs and oinks, until the chicken comes in clucking, "Book! Book!" Childlike illustrations glowing with rich colors follow the pleased book-bearing menagerie home, where "their sounds of delight lasted until sundown."
—Kristin Kloberdanz
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
When the children leave the farm to go back to school, the bored barnyard animals head to the library in search of something to do. But their language ("Neigh! Neigh!" and "Moo! Moo!") is only so much noise for the kindly but confused librarian--until a determined hen flaps in and clucks "Book! Book! Book!" Soon, the gang is back on the farm happily having a story hour of their own (the cow even presents a puppet show). The plot of this debut book may be predictable, but Beeke's (The Brand New Creature) acrylic-and-watercolor paintings buoy the story. With a cheery, na f style and dappled, Easter-basket colors, the artist makes every full-bleed spread look like a sunny mural composed by young library goers, and her vignettes keep the attempts at communication tightly focused. Even though her characterizations are deceptively simple, the resolve of the plucky fowl and glee of the newly book-equipped animals shines through. Young bibliophiles in particular will appreciate Beeke's depiction of the library as a welcoming place of fun and possibilities. Ages 2-6. (May) Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Children's Literature
A simple yet delightful tale that's well-told and well-illustrated, this is a story that parents, grandparents, teachers and story-hour librarians won't mind reading again and again, especially if they like to make barnyard noises. A group of farm animals wander into town in search of something to do and find that all the happy faces can be seen entering the public library. One by one, they try to get books but they are not understood. The hen, of course, is able to fulfill her quest (see the title to figure out why). Beeke's watercolor and acrylic illustrations are pleasingly simple, mimicking the drawings of children with the warmth and precision of an artist who knows how to appeal to kids while creating a style all her own. A must-have for anyone involved with small children. 2001, Arthur A. Levine Books/Scholastic Books, . Ages 2 to 5. Reviewer: Donna Freedman
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 1-Bruss has taken an old joke and drawn it out into a full-length picture book. When the children return to school, the barnyard is quiet and very dull. When the hen announces that she is heading to town, the rest of the animals follow. Seeing happy faces coming out of the library, she informs the others that she will go in and find something for them to do. Told that she is "too small for such a big job," the larger creatures take turns venturing inside, but cannot make themselves understood. Finally the hen goes in, says "Book! Book! Book!," and comes out with the desired items. The animals return to the farm and are pictured reading until the sun sets. In the unlikely event that children haven't already heard this joke, they will not be impressed by this belabored version. The very title of the story gives away the punch line and makes it anticlimactic. Beeke's watercolor illustrations featuring blue horses and dot-eyed children are pleasant but unexceptional.- Grace Oliff, Ann Blanche Smith School, Hillsdale, NJ Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
From the Publisher

When the children leave the farm to go back to school, the bored barnyard animals head to the library in search of something to do. But their language ("Neigh! Neigh!" and Moo! Moo! ") is only so much noise for the kindly but confused librarian--until a determined hen flaps in and clucks "Book! Book! Book!" Soon, the gang is back on the farm happily having a story hour of their own (the cow even presents a puppet show). The plot of this debut book may be predictable, but Beeke's (The Brand New Creature) acrylic-and-watercolor paintings buoy the story. With a cheery, naïf style and dappled, Easter-basket colors, the artist makes every full-bleed spread look like a sunny mural composed by young library goers, and her vignettes keep the attempts at communication tightly focused. Even though her characterizations are deceptively simple, the resolve of the plucky fowl and glee of the newly book-equipped animals shines through. Young bibliophiles in particular will appreciate Beeke's depiction of the library as a welcoming place of fun and possibilities.
--Publishers Weekly, April 23rd, 2001

When children bo back to school, the farm animals are bored, so they drive to town and try out the public library. The librarian can't understand what the horse, the cow, the goat, and the pig are saying. But then the hen clucks "Book! Book! Book!" and the librarian finally gets it and gives them all books to take home to the farm. Even young kids may find the nonsense a bit contrived, but they'll love making all the animal noises and recognize how it feels when an adult doesn't understand what they're saying. The playful, splashy pictures in watercolor and acrylic show the library as a busy, exciting place, where the goat gets absorbed in story hour, and the bullfrog is cozy on the bookshelves. In fact, in a running gag, the pictures show that the bullfrog has been at home with books from the beginning. Then the story hours comes to the barnyard, and the delighted neighs, moos, baas, oinks, quacks, and Book! Book! Book! go until sundown.
---Booklist, May 15th 2001

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780439135269
Publisher:
Scholastic, Inc.
Publication date:
01/01/2001

Meet the Author


Deborah Bruss is the author of the children's title, Book! Book! Book!, published by Arthur A. Levine Books. Bruss' work as an author has only been a relatively recent phenomenon. As a child, Bruss did not enjoy writing, and even attempted to avoid writing-intensive classes in high school. She did not overcome her fear of writing until she reached college and began her career as an author when she was in her thirties. She began writing in an attempt to interest her first grade son in books. Bruss wrote an adventure story for her son and then she decided to take writing classes at a local university.

Bruss had previously worked as a substitute teacher and school librarian and used these experiences to develop her writing. She began writing essays for the Home and Family section of the Sunday Monitor in Concord New Hampshire. Her latest work published by Scholastic is Book! Book! Book!, an imaginative children's title about animals who have discovered the library and have trouble communicating with the librarian. The idea for the book came from Bruss' father, whose joke inspired an idea for “a chicken demanding a book, book!”

Bruss currently resides in rural New Hampshire with her husband Michael, her sons Nathanial and Isaac and daughters Bayshay and Isatu. Her hobbies include traveling, sailing, swimming, adaptive skiing and singing with a female musical group, the Songweavers

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