Book Business: Publishing Past, Present, and Future
  • Book Business: Publishing Past, Present, and Future
  • Book Business: Publishing Past, Present, and Future

Book Business: Publishing Past, Present, and Future

4.6 3
by Jason Epstein
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

"An irresistible book about Grub Street, authorship and the literary marketplace."—Washington Post Book World See more details below

Overview

"An irresistible book about Grub Street, authorship and the literary marketplace."—Washington Post Book World

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“Congenial, erudite, electrifying, this book is a must read for anyone who cares about books and their business.—Publishers Weekly starred review
Epstein is not only thoughtful and experienced, but also a hell of a good writer.—Boston Sunday Globe, Peter Davison
Humane, razor sharp, and charmingly told.—Kirkus Reviews, starred review
Reading [Epstein's] book is like enjoying a great jazz impresario: there's a wonderful riff coming at any moment.—New York Times Book Review, Laurence J. Kirshbaum
It is possible, even likely, that no one knows more about the publishing industry than Jason Epstein.—Norman Mailer
A brilliant, moving and profoundly insightful rendering of the history, status and future of American publishing.—Toni Morrison
History, memoir, and prophecy ... [by a] man who has been at the creative heart of American publishing for fifty years.—E.L. Doctorow
A must read for all who love books and publishing and for all who wonder whether either will survive.—Howard Gardner
A wise and insightful book on the present state and the future of book publishing.—Michael Korda”
Norman Mailer
It is possible, even likely, that no one knows more about the publishing industry than Jason Epstein.
Michael Korda
A wise and insightful book on the present state and the future of book publishing.
Toni Morrison
A brilliant, moving and profoundly insightful rendering of the history, status and future of American publishing.
Howard Gardner
A must read for all who love books and publishing and for all who wonder whether either will survive.
Peter Davison
Epstein is not only thoughtful and experienced, but also a hell of a good writer. —Boston Sunday Globe
E.L. Doctorow
History, memoir, and prophecy ... [by a] man who has been at the creative heart of American publishing for fifty years.
Michael Dirda
An irresistible book about Grub Street, authorship and the literary marketplace. —Washington Post Book World
New York Times Book Review
Reading [Epstein's] book is like enjoying a great jazz impresario: there's a wonderful riff coming at any moment.
Laurence J. Kirshbaum
Reading [Epstein's] book is like enjoying a great jazz impresario: there's a wonderful riff coming at any moment. —New York Times Book Review
Washington Post Book World
An irresistible book about Grub Street, authorship and the literary marketplace.
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
In October 1999, Epstein, former editorial director of Random House, delivered a series of lectures at the New York Public Library that galvanized the publishing world. This book is based on those lectures. A genuine elder statesman of the industry, Epstein has spent about 50 years in publishing, during which he helped create the "paperback revolution," the New York Review of Books and the Library of America. Here, short, magisterial chapters describe the recent past of American publishing through the lens of Epstein's career, and lookDnow fearfully, now hopefullyDat the spirit of book publishing to come. Epstein explains that, in his youth, the book trade was as much vocation as business, bringing to the world the fruits of literary modernism. In more recent decades, by contrast, investors and conglomerates, he says, seeking "name-brand authors" and economies of scale, have treated books as a product like any other. New technologies, however, might reverse these baleful (as seen by Epstein) trends. This forceful if hardly startling analysis introduces Epstein's compact and compelling reminiscences, which form the bulk of the book. Each chapter includes famous names (Auden, Nabokov, Edmund Wilson, Bennett Cerf, cyber-pioneer Norbert Weiner); revealing, amusing anecdotes; and clear accounts of who paid the bills for what, and how, and why. Most strikingly, Epstein looks forward to the "worldwide village green" the digital age might createDone in which books, he says, will keep a place, and publishing will "become once more a cottage industry of diverse, creative, autonomous" work, albeit at the expense of many of the middlemen who stand between author and reader, including today's big publishers. Congenial, erudite, electrifying, this book is a must read for anyone who cares about books and their business. (Jan. 15) Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.
Library Journal
Drawing on his W.W. Norton Lectures at the New York Public Library in October 1999, publishing giant Epstein considers what's wrong with the industry today. Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.
Kirshbaum
A charming ode to that past, even as it tries to decipher the technological future . . . The reader is swept up by Epstein's fingertip brilliance as he ranges swiftly across the history of publishing . . .
New York Times Book Review
Larry McMurtry
Part of Epstein's book is credo, part of it is history, and part of it is prophecy; the credo is passionate, the history is confident, and the prophecy is hesitant, though I suspect it was chiefly for the prophecy that Epstein was induced to speak.
The New Republic

Read More

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780393322347
Publisher:
Norton, W. W. & Company, Inc.
Publication date:
01/28/2002
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
226
Sales rank:
1,428,183
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.52(d)

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >