×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Book of J
     

Book of J

5.0 2
by Harold Bloom, David Rosenberg (Translator)
 

See All Formats & Editions


J is the title that scholars ascribe to the nameless writer they believe is responsible for the text, written between 950 and 900 BCE, on which Genesis, Exodus and Numbers is based. In The Book of J, Bloom and Rosenberg draw the J text out of the surrounding material and present it as the seminal classic that it is.
In addition to Rosenberg's original

Overview


J is the title that scholars ascribe to the nameless writer they believe is responsible for the text, written between 950 and 900 BCE, on which Genesis, Exodus and Numbers is based. In The Book of J, Bloom and Rosenberg draw the J text out of the surrounding material and present it as the seminal classic that it is.
In addition to Rosenberg's original translations, Bloom argues in several essays that "J" was not a religious writer but a fierce ironist and a woman living in the court of King Solomon. He also argues that J is a writer on par with Homer, Shakespeare and Tolstoy.
Bloom also offers historical context, a discussion of the theory of how the different texts came together to create the Bible, and translation notes. Rosenberg's translations from the Hebrew bring J's stories to life and reveal her towering originality and grasp of humanity.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
This controversial, bestselling collaboration is a translation of and critical look at text within Genesis, Exodus, Numbers and Deuteronomy written by an ostensibly female author known only as ``J.'' (Nov.)no PW
Library Journal
Modern biblical critics have called the author of the oldest texts in the Hebrew Bible J, standing for Jahweh. Bloom and translator Rosenberg, authors of many works of literary criticism and of Jewish and biblical studies, have collaborated on a clear but controversial translation and analysis of parts of the Pentateuch using the term Jahweh. Bloom claims that the author of J was a woman, living in or at the time of the Solomonic court, 950-900 B.C.E., who wrote these selections not as a religious or historical treatise but as a literary work that Bloom compares to Shakespeare. While Rosenberg's translation is both modern and moving, he has made significant changes in the meanings of the Hebrew text. The proofs offered for these theories are no substitute for hard evidence. Nevertheless, The Book of J deserves consideration as a literary work.-- Maurice Tuchman, Hebrew Coll. Lib., Brookline, Mass.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780802141910
Publisher:
Grove/Atlantic, Inc.
Publication date:
12/15/2004
Pages:
340
Product dimensions:
5.46(w) x 8.24(h) x 0.32(d)

Meet the Author

One of our most popular, respected, and controversial literary critics, Yale University professor Harold Bloom¿s books ¿ about, variously, Shakespeare, the Bible, and the classic literature ¿ are as erudite as they are accessible.

Brief Biography

Hometown:
New York, New York and New Haven, Connecticut
Date of Birth:
July 11, 1930
Place of Birth:
New York, New York
Education:
B.A., Cornell University, 1951; Ph.D., Yale University, 1955

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

Book of J 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
In this unique book there are several simularities between 'J' and the prophet Jonah. they lived around the same time. Both were Hebrew under the rule of Jerobaum II. Assuming the 'Book of Jonah' was written by the prophet, which illustrates all the charactoristics of a passionate yet powerfull writter and plus of course the obvious his name beggins with the letter J. My question is, Could the three texts of gennesis, exidus,and numbers, been written by the same oracle sent to nineveth by gods command?