The Book of Job

( 3 )

Overview

"An extraordinary and invaluable version of this great biblical treasure."—David R. Slavitt, Philadelphia Inquirer
One of the most powerful and unsettling Bible stories, The Book of Job undermines the claim that our world is governed by justice and meaning. It does so through a poetry of unsurpassed beauty captured in Raymond Scheindlin's superb new translation. Scheindlin's Job is not a patient sufferer but a defiant man who eloquently demands an argument with God. Job's words land like a fist, but he is left ...

See more details below
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (10) from $8.00   
  • New (6) from $9.36   
  • Used (4) from $8.00   
Sending request ...

Overview

"An extraordinary and invaluable version of this great biblical treasure."—David R. Slavitt, Philadelphia Inquirer
One of the most powerful and unsettling Bible stories, The Book of Job undermines the claim that our world is governed by justice and meaning. It does so through a poetry of unsurpassed beauty captured in Raymond Scheindlin's superb new translation. Scheindlin's Job is not a patient sufferer but a defiant man who eloquently demands an argument with God. Job's words land like a fist, but he is left speechless by God's reply from the storm — a commanding survey of creation and a challenge to man's place in it. Job's acceptance of God's power comes with a dignity and freshness that makes it compelling even today. In Scheindlin's vivid translation an ancient text speaks to us directly of timeless questions and passions. A selection of the Book-of-the-Month Club, History Book Club, Quality Paperback Book Club, and Jewish Book Club

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Andy Brumer
. . .Scheindlin. . .translates the biblical Hebrew into language that is mellifluous and eloquent, yet contemporary in tone. —The New York Times Book Review
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
The Book of Job addresses eternal questions about humanity's place in God's creation, the presence of evil in the world, God's responsibility for the existence of evil and humans' ability to understand God's ways. Scheindlin, professor of medieval Hebrew literature at the Jewish Theological Seminary of America, offers a new translation of Job. Scheindlin writes in the introduction that he tried to let the text itself suggest its own translation and interfere as little as possible. He wanted to produce a translation that would reflect the poetic values specific to biblical Hebrew. In Scheindlin's translation, Job is an angry yet hopeful character who knows that his suffering is undeserved and demands an audience with God. Thus, Job cries, 'Let God weigh me in an honest balance/ He will have to see my innocence./ If only I had someone to hear me!' In Scheindlin's fresh lyrical verse, we can once again feel Job's pain and distress as he attempts to understand why he is suffering.
Library Journal
Scheindlin (medieval Hebrew literature, Jewish Theological Seminary of America) provides a powerful, colloquial translation of the Book of Job, a biblical book that raises important questions about human suffering, the nature of evil, goodness, merit, and justice. Contrary to much contemporary scholarship, Scheindlin's helpful introduction attributes coherence and unity to Job in its final form. This translation seems more direct, contemporary, and forceful than the New International Version (NIV), the New Revised Standard Version (NRSV), and the new Jewish Publication Society (JPS) translation. Scheindlin's Job, scandalized by undeserved suffering, angrily calls God to account while courageously facing the disproportion between himself and God. -- Carolyn M. Craft, Longwood College., Farmville, Virginia
Andy Brumer
. . .Scheindlin. . .translates the biblical Hebrew into language that is mellifluous and eloquent, yet contemporary in tone. -- The New York Times Book Review
Gabriel Josipovici
Scheindlin's excellent introduction and notes, as well as his fine translation and the way he lays the text out on the page, make us feel as though we were reading this well-known and mysterious work for the first time.
Times Literary Supplement
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780393319002
  • Publisher: Norton, W. W. & Company, Inc.
  • Publication date: 5/28/1999
  • Pages: 240
  • Sales rank: 194,538
  • Product dimensions: 5.10 (w) x 7.80 (h) x 0.60 (d)

Meet the Author

Raymond P. Scheindlin is professor of medieval Hebrew literature at the Jewish Theological Seminary of America. His introduction and notes are full of insights into this provocative text.

Raymond P. Scheindlin is professor of medieval Hebrew literature at the Jewish Theological Seminary of America. His introduction and notes are full of insights into this provocative text.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 3 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(3)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Posted March 4, 2012

    The Book of Job-A superb translation

    Scheindlin's translation of the Book of Job is nuanced and conveys the deeper meanings of one of the world's great poems. The question of suffering, theodicy, the power of God are all there.
    The footnotes and introduction are enlightening.On pages 25 and 26,Scheindlin is at his best when he points out that there are no answers to the causes of grief and suffering.
    A. Eric Rosen

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 13, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Commanding

    The translation and notes enriched my reading of this great work. The translation is elegant; the notes clarify my reading from other translations. I want now to read more of Professor Scheindlin's work. The reader will want also to read Professor Robert Alter's recent translation of Job.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 7, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)