The Book of Leadership and Strategy: Lessons of the Chinese Masters [NOOK Book]

Overview

The subtle arts of management and leadership have been developed over thousands of years by the Chinese.
The
Book of Leadership and Strategy

represents the Taoist culmination of this long tradition and is one of the most prestigious works of ancient Chinese thought. Collected here are insightful teachings on the challenges of leadership on all levels, from organizational ...

See more details below
The Book of Leadership and Strategy: Lessons of the Chinese Masters

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$10.49
BN.com price
(Save 44%)$18.95 List Price

Overview

The subtle arts of management and leadership have been developed over thousands of years by the Chinese.
The
Book of Leadership and Strategy

represents the Taoist culmination of this long tradition and is one of the most prestigious works of ancient Chinese thought. Collected here are insightful teachings on the challenges of leadership on all levels, from organizational management to political statecraft. The translator, Thomas Cleary, has chosen and arranged these teachings to emphasize the most valuable lessons of Taoist wisdom for modern Western readers. Like Cleary's best-selling translation of
The
Art of War

by Sun Tzu, this work will serve as an enlightening guide for people in business, politics, and government.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780834828216
  • Publisher: Shambhala Publications, Inc.
  • Publication date: 11/12/2013
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • File size: 377 KB

Meet the Author

Thomas Cleary holds a PhD in East Asian Languages and Civilizations from Harvard University and a JD from the University of California, Berkeley, Boalt Hall School of Law. He is the translator of over fifty volumes of Buddhist, Taoist, Confucian, and Islamic texts from Sanskrit, Chinese, Japanese, Pali, and Arabic.

Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

On
Peace

If you know when you have enough, you will not be disgraced.

If you know when to stop, you will not be endangered.

—Lao-tzu,
Tao-te
Ching

Those who can maintain the world certainly do not lose their nations. Those who can maintain their nations certainly do not lose their families. Those who can take care of their families certainly do not neglect themselves. Those who can cultivate themselves certainly do not forget their minds. Those who can find the source of their minds certainly do not corrode their essential nature.
Those who can completely preserve the integrity of their essential nature certainly do not waver indecisively on the Way.

Therefore,
the Master of Expanded Development said, "Carefully guard within,
thoroughly close without; cognizing much is defeating. Do not look, do not listen; embrace the spirit calmly, and the body will straighten itself."

None can know another without attaining it in oneself. Therefore, the "Book of
Changes" says, "Close up the bag, and there is no blame or praise."

If you are clear, calm, and uncontrived, heaven will provide a time for you. If you are modest, frugal, and disciplined, earth will produce wealth for you.

When a boat is crossing a river, if an empty boat broadsides it and overturns it,
the passengers in the first boat may very well be upset, but they won't be resentful.

Those who know how to learn are like axles of a car: the center of the hub does not itself move, but with it they go a thousand miles, beginning again when they finish, operating an inexhaustible resource.

Those who do not know how to learn are as though lost: tell them the cardinal directions, and they misunderstand; listening from their own point of view,
they are disoriented and therefore fail to get the gist of the whole matter.
Perfected people lean on a pillar that cannot be toppled, travel a road that cannot be blocked, take orders from a perennial government, and arrive wherever they go.

Life cannot hang on their minds; death cannot darken their spirits.

When people can penetrate the deepest darkness and enter the shining light, then it is possible to talk to them about the ultimate.

Those in whom sense overpowers desire flourish, while those in whom desire overpowers sense perish.

Habitual desires deplete people's energy; likes and dislikes strain people's minds. If you don't get rid of them quickly, your will and energy will diminish day by day.

When you penetrate psychology, you realize that habitual desires, likes and dislikes, are external.

What
I call happiness is when people appreciate what they have. People who appreciate what they have do not consider extravagance enjoyable and do not consider frugality a sorry state.

People crave position, power, and wealth, but if it is a matter of holding a map of the world in your left hand while cutting your throat with your right hand,
even an ignoramus would not do that. Seen in this light, life is more valuable than worldly dominion.



Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 1, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)