The Book of Leadership and Strategy: Lessons of the Chinese Masters

The Book of Leadership and Strategy: Lessons of the Chinese Masters

by Thomas Cleary
     
 

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The subtle arts of management and leadership have been developed over thousands of years by the Chinese.
The
Book of Leadership and Strategy

represents the Taoist culmination of this long tradition and is one of the most prestigious works of ancient Chinese thought. Collected here are insightful teachings on the challenges of leadership on all

See more details below

Overview

The subtle arts of management and leadership have been developed over thousands of years by the Chinese.
The
Book of Leadership and Strategy

represents the Taoist culmination of this long tradition and is one of the most prestigious works of ancient Chinese thought. Collected here are insightful teachings on the challenges of leadership on all levels, from organizational management to political statecraft. The translator, Thomas Cleary, has chosen and arranged these teachings to emphasize the most valuable lessons of Taoist wisdom for modern Western readers. Like Cleary's best-selling translation of
The
Art of War

by Sun Tzu, this work will serve as an enlightening guide for people in business, politics, and government.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780834828216
Publisher:
Shambhala Publications, Inc.
Publication date:
11/12/2013
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
0 MB

Read an Excerpt

On
Peace

If you know when you have enough, you will not be disgraced.

If you know when to stop, you will not be endangered.

—Lao-tzu,
Tao-te
Ching

Those who can maintain the world certainly do not lose their nations. Those who can maintain their nations certainly do not lose their families. Those who can take care of their families certainly do not neglect themselves. Those who can cultivate themselves certainly do not forget their minds. Those who can find the source of their minds certainly do not corrode their essential nature.
Those who can completely preserve the integrity of their essential nature certainly do not waver indecisively on the Way.

Therefore,
the Master of Expanded Development said, "Carefully guard within,
thoroughly close without; cognizing much is defeating. Do not look, do not listen; embrace the spirit calmly, and the body will straighten itself."

None can know another without attaining it in oneself. Therefore, the "Book of
Changes" says, "Close up the bag, and there is no blame or praise."

If you are clear, calm, and uncontrived, heaven will provide a time for you. If you are modest, frugal, and disciplined, earth will produce wealth for you.

When a boat is crossing a river, if an empty boat broadsides it and overturns it,
the passengers in the first boat may very well be upset, but they won't be resentful.

Those who know how to learn are like axles of a car: the center of the hub does not itself move, but with it they go a thousand miles, beginning again when they finish, operating an inexhaustible resource.

Those who do not know how to learn are as though lost: tell them the cardinal directions, and they misunderstand; listening from their own point of view,
they are disoriented and therefore fail to get the gist of the whole matter.
Perfected people lean on a pillar that cannot be toppled, travel a road that cannot be blocked, take orders from a perennial government, and arrive wherever they go.

Life cannot hang on their minds; death cannot darken their spirits.

When people can penetrate the deepest darkness and enter the shining light, then it is possible to talk to them about the ultimate.

Those in whom sense overpowers desire flourish, while those in whom desire overpowers sense perish.

Habitual desires deplete people's energy; likes and dislikes strain people's minds. If you don't get rid of them quickly, your will and energy will diminish day by day.

When you penetrate psychology, you realize that habitual desires, likes and dislikes, are external.

What
I call happiness is when people appreciate what they have. People who appreciate what they have do not consider extravagance enjoyable and do not consider frugality a sorry state.

People crave position, power, and wealth, but if it is a matter of holding a map of the world in your left hand while cutting your throat with your right hand,
even an ignoramus would not do that. Seen in this light, life is more valuable than worldly dominion.



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